Lilias Farthing

F, #21141, b. 14 October 1851
FatherWilliam Farthing
MotherLillias Brown b. 1824, d. 11 Sep 1901

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth14 October 1851Lilias Farthing was born on Tuesday, 14 October 1851 at Newcastle, NSW, Australia.
She was the daughter of William Farthing and Lillias Brown.
Marriage1873Lilias was married to Donald Flemming in 1873 at Maitland, NSW, Australia.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1873As of 1873, her married name was Flemming.
Last Edited9 Dec 2007

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Donald Flemming

M, #21142

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Marriage1873Donald was married to Lilias Farthing, daughter of William Farthing and Lillias Brown, in 1873 at Maitland, NSW, Australia.
Last Edited9 Dec 2007

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The Ship Margaret

#21143

Voyages

DateDetails
1840The Ship Margaret sailed from Liverpool, Lancashire, England, in 1840 and arrived in Sydney on 28 March 1841.
Last Edited28 Jun 2003

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John Brown

M, #21144

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
MarriageJohn was married to Agnes Unknown.

Family with

Agnes Unknown
Child
Last Edited25 Dec 2006

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Agnes Unknown

F, #21145

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
MarriageAgnes was married to John Brown.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married NameHer married name was Brown.

Family with

John Brown
Child
Last Edited25 Dec 2006

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The Ship Pericles

#21146

Voyages

DateDetails
29 August 1879The Ship Pericles sailed from Plymouth, Devon, England, on Friday, 29 August 1879 with David Wilson, Robert Wilson, Annie Wilson, Elizabeth Wilson and Jane Brown Stevenson aboard and arrived in Sydney on 14 November 1879.
Last Edited28 Jun 2003

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The Ship William Nicol

#21147, b. 1834

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1834The Ship William Nicol was built in 1834 at Greenock, Scotland.

Voyages

DateDetails
6 July 1837The Ship William Nicol sailed from Isleornsay, Isle of Skye, Scotland, on Thursday, 6 July 1837 with Charles McInnes, John McInnes, Mary McPherson, Donald McKinnon, Donald McInnes, Hector McInnes, Isabella McInnes, Angus McInnes, Finlay McInnes, Malcolm McInnes and Alexander McKenzie aboard with 321 passengers aboard and arrived in Sydney on 27 October 1837.

The William Nicol (408 tons commanded by Captain John McAlpine) had been purpose built and was the first ship to be chartered by the Government for carrying aided emigrants to a new life in the Antipodes. The Edinburgh Courier of 10 July 1837 reported on the embarkation on Monday 3 July 1837 at Ornsay on the Isle of Skye and described the ship as being fitted in the most commodius manner possible and all who visited her were satisfied that the comforts of all the emigrants has been minutely attended to. She was furnished to accommodate 250 adult passengers, each being allowed 18 inches width to sleep in!

The ship set sail three days after embarkation, carrying in all 323 passengers of which 69 were men, 75 women, 72 children aged seven and above and 107 under sevens. For sleeping purposes two children over seven and three under, equated to one adult. On top of this there was the crew who had their own quarters amongst whom was the ship's doctor and surgeon, Dr George Roberts of the Royal Navy. The good doctor must have had big problems with his emigrant patients as they were all, by and large, gaelic speaking and according to reports, two shepherds of good character were given cabins as they were to act as interpreters. A midwife, a Mrs McDonald, undertook to act in similar capacity for the women and children.

During the voyage it appears that everyone spent as much time on deck as they could to escape the overcrowded and evil-smelling sleeping quarters which were on the same deck as the hospital. Below deck was fumigated as often as possible and, whenever practical, aired. The deck of the sleeping quarters were scraped daily in an effort to keep the area clean. The doctor, although not being specific, stated that the people were not very clean in their habits. His log shows that as the ship sailed into the tropics the smell, along with the suffering, increased with the heat. The young children, in particular, were hard hit.

The diet on board was not what the children were used to and although they didn't get scurvy, they suffered bouts of fever and diarrhoea and frequently refused food. At home in Scotland they had been used to milk, vegetables and porridge but whilst on board they had biscuits with salt beef and pork. Looking through the doctor's log, large numbers seem to have suffered at first from sea sickness but it soon became apparent that the women and children were suffering most. In the beginning constipation was the most common problem but diarrhoea soon took over as the chief complaint. Fever and sickness often followed in its wake and, with the very young, sometimes resulted in death. There were 19 deaths during the voyage; all children under the age of six apart from the two women who died after childbirth.

After 66 days at sea, the William Nicol put into port at the Cape of Good Hope on 11 September 1837 to take on fresh water. The Governor, Sir Benjamin D'Urban, was horrified at the conditions on board and instigated a private collection to help the emigrants. £150 was raised in one day and was used to buy, amongst other things, changes of clothing as well as sago and rice. Dr Roberts, himself, arranged for fresh beef and vegetables to be bought to supplement the children's diet; the receipts were sent back to London for payment. After four days the ship continued the voyage and arrived in Port Jackson on 28 October. The doctor's log records, the emigrants throughout were in perfect health when they were discharged the following day.

Last Edited13 Jan 2012

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The Barque Agenoria

#21148, b. 1846

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1846The Barque Agenoria was built in 1846 at St John, New Brunswick.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Name VariationThe Barque Agenoria was also known as The Ship Agenora.

Description

DateDescription
7 February 1849In 7 February 1849 The Barque Agenoria was described as 173 feet long by 36.7 feet wide.

Voyages

DateDetails
7 February 1849The Barque Agenoria sailed from Plymouth, Devon, England, on Wednesday, 7 February 1849 with John Miller, Mary Wilson, Christina Allen Miller, Margaret Wilson Miller and John Allen Miller aboard and arrived in Sydney on 25 May 1849 under Captain R Newby.

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
Shipping Gazette, No. 271 Vol. 6, Sydney, NSW, Australia26 May 1849The Barque Agenoria was mentioned in an article in Shipping Gazette, No. 271 Vol. 6, Sydney, NSW, Australia, on Saturday, 26 May 1849 as follows:

Ships in Harbour (Sydney) - Agenoria, barque, 724 tons, Newby, in the Stream; Captain, agent. Disembarking emigrants, and about to discharge.
Arrivals May 25 - Agenoria, 724 tons, Captain Newby, from London 30th January and Plymouth the 7th February. Passengers ...... and 256 immigrants.

pages 143 to 144: This vessel has made a good passage of one hundred and seven days from Plymouth. She is commanded by Captain Newby, formerly of the Mary, and an old trader to this colony.... She has on board 256 immigrants (English, Irish and Scotch), of whom 97 are male and 88 female adults, 29 boys and 32 girls from one to fourteen years of age and ten infants. Seven deaths and six births occurred during the voyage. All on board are now in good health, and much credit is due to the commander, surgeon Superintendant, and officers of the ship, for the remarkably clean condition in which she has arrived. On the 13th March, the Agenoria spoke the barque Competitor, from Adelaide, bound for London, out seventy five days in latitude 0.47N, longitude 21.52W.
the Maitland Mercury, Maitland, NSW, Australia30 May 1849The Barque Agenoria was mentioned in an article in the Maitland Mercury, Maitland, NSW, Australia, on Wednesday, 30 May 1849 as follows:

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE (From the Sydney Morning Herald):- THE AGENORIA - This vessel has made a good passage of one hundred and seven days from Plymouth. She is commanded by Captain Newby, formerly of the Mary, and an old trader to this colony. By her we are in possession of dates from London up to the 4th of February. She has on board 256 immigrants (English, Irish and Scotch), of whom 97 are male and 88 female adults, 29 boys and 32 girls from one to fourteen years, and 10 infants. Seven deaths and six births occurred during the voyage. All on board are now in good health, and much credit is due to the commander, surgeon superintendant, and officers of the ship, for the remarkably clean condition in which she has arrived.1
Last Edited29 Apr 2013

Citations

  1. [S1002] Ian Wright, "Margaret Wilson Miller," e-mail to Robert Mote, March 2012.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

John Allen Miller

M, #21149, b. 13 October 1836, d. 19 August 1908
FatherJohn Miller b. 24 Aug 1812, d. 6 Jul 1882
MotherMary Wilson b. 20 Dec 1813, d. 8 Sep 1881

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth13 October 1836John Allen Miller was born on Thursday, 13 October 1836 at Airdrie, Scotland.1
He was the son of John Miller and Mary Wilson.
Marriage31 December 1862John Allen was married to Mary Grant on Wednesday, 31 December 1862 at Newcastle, NSW, Australia.1,2
Death19 August 1908John Allen Miller died on Wednesday, 19 August 1908 at Newcastle, NSW, at age 71.1

Voyages

DateDetails
7 February 1849John Allen Miller was a passenger aboard The Barque Agenoria which sailed from Plymouth, Devon, England, on Wednesday, 7 February 1849 and arrived in Sydney on 25 May 1849 under Captain R Newby.

Family with

Mary Grant b. c 1840, d. 23 Dec 1910
Child
Last Edited21 May 2007

Citations

  1. [S450] Jan McInnes, "Jonas Jackson," e-mail to Robert Mote, various.
  2. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place Marriage Registered: Newcastle; Year: 1862; Number: 2453.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Margaret Wilson Miller

F, #21150, b. circa 1843, d. 15 March 1930
FatherJohn Miller b. 24 Aug 1812, d. 6 Jul 1882
MotherMary Wilson b. 20 Dec 1813, d. 8 Sep 1881

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birthcirca 1843Margaret Wilson Miller was born circa 1843 at Airdrie, Lanarkshire, Scotland.1
She was the daughter of John Miller and Mary Wilson.
Marriage30 January 1864Margaret Wilson was married to William John Croker on Saturday, 30 January 1864 at Newcastle, NSW, Australia.1
Death15 March 1930Margaret Wilson Croker died on Saturday, 15 March 1930 at Clarencetown, NSW, Australia.1
BurialMarch 1930She was buried in March 1930 at the Presbyterian Section, Stony Creek Cemetery, Clarencetown, NSW, Australia.1

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1864As of 30 January 1864, her married name was Croker.1

Voyages

DateDetails
7 February 1849Margaret Wilson Miller was a passenger aboard The Barque Agenoria which sailed from Plymouth, Devon, England, on Wednesday, 7 February 1849 and arrived in Sydney on 25 May 1849 under Captain R Newby.

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
the Maitland Mercury, Maitland, NSW, Australia3 November 1881Margaret Wilson Miller was mentioned in an article in the Maitland Mercury, Maitland, NSW, Australia, on Thursday, 3 November 1881 as follows:

CLARENCETOWN.
A shocking and most distressing occurrence happened a few days since to one of Mr Croker's family. While the youngest child, a boy of about 12 months old, was asleep in bed it was attacked by a rat, which stripped the lower eyelid from its place, and would no doubt have effected other and perhaps fatal injuries had not the poor child cried out, and aroused its parents. As soon as it was day-light, Mr & Mrs Croker drove with the sufferer to Morpeth, but as there was no surgeon there they were recommended to proceed on directly to Newcastle, whither Mrs Croker, in charge of the child, immediately went. Rats are just now very troublesome about the neighbourhood of the river. The premises of Mr C F Holmes, at Fotheringay are much infested with them, and Mr Holmes has been laying down poison for the purpose of exterminating the vermin. Although every precaution was used, some of the house and cattle dogs were unfortunately fatal sufferers.1

Last Edited28 Apr 2013

Citations

  1. [S1002] Ian Wright, "Margaret Wilson Miller," e-mail to Robert Mote, March 2012.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

The Ship Henry Porcher

#21151, b. before 1839

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birthbefore 1839The Ship Henry Porcher was built before 1839.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Name VariationThe Ship Henry Porcher was also known as The Ship Henry Porsche.

Voyages

DateDetails
October 1839The Ship Henry Porcher sailed from Isle of Skye, Scotland, in October 1839 with Jonathan McInnes, Ann McKinnon, Ellen McInnes, Alexander Munro, Grace Thomson, Laughlan McKinnon and Janet Ross aboard with 211 passengers and arrived in Australia on 21 February 1840.
Last Edited13 Dec 2011

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Meron McInnes1

F, #21152, b. 1817, d. 21 October 1888
FatherJonathan McInnes b. 1793, d. 19 May 1862
MotherAnn McKinnon b. 1795

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1817Meron McInnes was born in 1817 at Scotland.
She was the daughter of Jonathan McInnes and Ann McKinnon.
Marriage22 December 1845Meron was married to Angus Nicholson on Monday, 22 December 1845 at Clifton, Picton, NSW, Australia.
Death21 October 1888Meron McInnes died on Sunday, 21 October 1888 at Fairy Hill, Picton, NSW, Australia.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1845As of 22 December 1845, her married name was Nicholson.
Last Edited11 Feb 2008

Citations

  1. This should perhaps be Mary Ann McInnes.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Angus Nicholson

M, #21153

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Marriage22 December 1845Angus was married to Meron McInnes, daughter of Jonathan McInnes and Ann McKinnon, on Monday, 22 December 1845 at Clifton, Picton, NSW, Australia.
Last Edited28 Jul 2007

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Angus McInnes

M, #21154, b. 1823, d. 15 April 1903
FatherJonathan McInnes b. 1793, d. 19 May 1862
MotherAnn McKinnon b. 1795

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1823Angus McInnes was born in 1823 at Strath, Isle of Skye, Scotland.
He was the son of Jonathan McInnes and Ann McKinnon.
Death15 April 1903Angus McInnes died on Wednesday, 15 April 1903 at Picton, NSW, Australia.
Burialcirca 16 April 1903He was buried circa 16 April 1903 at Picton, NSW.
Last Edited28 Jul 2007

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Christina McInnes

F, #21155, b. 30 December 1827, d. 27 May 1910
FatherJonathan McInnes b. 1793, d. 19 May 1862
MotherAnn McKinnon b. 1795

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth30 December 1827Christina McInnes was born on Sunday, 30 December 1827 at Strath, Isle of Skye, Scotland.
She was the daughter of Jonathan McInnes and Ann McKinnon.
Marriage12 May 1851Christina was married to Captain Lachlan Macalister on Monday, 12 May 1851 at Clifton, Picton, NSW, Australia.
Marriage23 February 1861Christina was married to Robert Alexander McInnes on Saturday, 23 February 1861.
Death27 May 1910Christina McInnes died on Friday, 27 May 1910 at Sydney, NSW, Australia, at age 82.
Burialcirca 28 May 1910She was buried circa 28 May 1910 at Rookwood Cemetery, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1851As of 12 May 1851, her married name was Macalister.
Last Edited4 Nov 2007

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Alexander McInnes

M, #21156, b. 1818
FatherJonathan McInnes b. 1793, d. 19 May 1862
MotherAnn McKinnon b. 1795

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1818Alexander McInnes was born in 1818.
He was the son of Jonathan McInnes and Ann McKinnon.
Last Edited28 Jul 2007

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The Ship Golconda

#21157, b. 1852
The Ship Golconda

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1852The Ship Golconda was built in 1852 at St John, New Brunswick, Canada, and was a three-master of 1124 tons; 171 feet long by 33 feet wide and 22 feet deep in the hold.

Description

DateDescription
The Golconda's tonnage has been listed variously as of 1087 old tons or 424 new tons, 1170, 1044 and 1224, indicating different bases of calculation.

Voyages

DateDetails
23 January 1853The Ship Golconda sailed from Liverpool, Lancashire, England, on Sunday, 23 January 1853 and anchored at the port of New Orleans on 26 March 1853. The Captain was George Kerr.

On this trip the Golconda was carrying 321 Mormons who were presided over by Elder Jacob Gates.

During the crossing of the Atlantic a brief storm wrecked the vessel's three top masts. Two emigrants died, two couples were married, four babies were born and a Swedish sailor was baptized. According to the Millennial Star, the "conduct of Captain Kerr gave great satisfaction to all the company, and before parting a vote of thanks, with three cheers was tendered him"

After six weeks on the ocean the Golconda arrived at the mouth of the Mississippi River. There they waited for twelve days before a steam tug could tow her to New Orleans. The trip from Liverpool took a total of sixty-two days.1
4 February 1854The Ship Golconda sailed from Liverpool, Lancashire, England, on Saturday, 4 February 1854 and arrived in New Orleans on 18 March 1854 under Captain George Kerr.

The Golconda was carrying 464 Mormons who were supervised by Elder Door P Curtis, assisted by Elders Thomas Squires and W S Phillips. The emigrants were organised into seven branches, and meetings were held five times a week with many reported spiritual manifestations.

Winds were contrary early in the voyage, but after a few days the weather was favorable which made the crossing pleasant most of the time. after a forty-two day passage Captain Kerr brought his ship safely to New Orleans.

Two marriages were solomnized during the voyage and there was one death. At New Orleans three emigrants were quarantined. Having crossed the Atlantic safely, ten people died on the Mississippi River between New Orleans and St. Louis.1
2 July 1858The Ship Golconda sailed from Liverpool, Lancashire, England, on Friday, 2 July 1858 with Elizabeth Clegg, John H Mutch, Thomas Harvey, Ellen Davies, Joseph Mutch, Alice Mutch, Hannah Mutch and Thomas Robinson Martin aboard and arrived at Sydney on 21 October 1858, a voyage of 111 days. The Captain was George Kerr and the Surgeon was John Carleton Bury.

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
Article1868There is no listing of the Golconda in Lloyd's Register after 1868.
Last Edited13 Dec 2009

Citations

  1. [S337] The Ship Golconda, online http://www.csranet.com/~dcarlsen/famhistory/golconda.html

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Captain Lachlan Macalister

M, #21158, b. 1797, d. 1855

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1797Captain Lachlan Macalister was born in 1797.
Marriage12 May 1851Lachlan was married to Christina McInnes, daughter of Jonathan McInnes and Ann McKinnon, on Monday, 12 May 1851 at Clifton, Picton, NSW, Australia.
Death1855Captain Lachlan Macalister died in 1855.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Namesake1857Lachlan McAlister McInnes was named for Captain Lachlan Macalister.
Last Edited12 Mar 2013

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Robert Alexander McInnes

M, #21159, b. 1836, d. 6 June 1885

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1836Robert Alexander McInnes was born in 1836 at Fort William, Argyll, Scotland.
Marriage23 February 1861Robert Alexander was married to Christina McInnes, daughter of Jonathan McInnes and Ann McKinnon, on Saturday, 23 February 1861.
Death6 June 1885Robert Alexander McInnes died on Saturday, 6 June 1885 at Boro, NSW, Australia.
Last Edited19 Feb 2009

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William Mathieson Jackson

M, #21160, b. 25 July 1923, d. 8 December 2002
William Mathieson Jackson
FatherJonas Jackson b. 9 May 1888, d. 28 Jul 1972
MotherJane Stevenson Mathieson b. 2 Nov 1889, d. 19 Aug 1973
Relationship6th great-grandson of John Jackson

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth25 July 1923William Mathieson Jackson was born on Wednesday, 25 July 1923 at Mayfield, NSW, Australia.
He was the son of Jonas Jackson and Jane Stevenson Mathieson.
Marriage21 April 1945William Mathieson was married to Nancy Murdoch on Saturday, 21 April 1945 at Hamilton, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.
Death8 December 2002William Mathieson Jackson died at 1:45 am on Sunday, 8 December 2002 at NSW, Australia, at age 79.
Burial10 December 2002He was buried on 10 December 2002 at NSW.
ChartsDescendant Chart - Edward Eglintine
Descendant Chart - John Jackson
Descendant Chart - John Wilson
Last Edited25 Aug 2009

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.