Jane Blackman1

F, #20641, b. circa 1778

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birthcirca 1778Jane Blackman was born circa 1778 at EnglandG.2
Marriage1 October 1803Jane was married to Henry Sheather, son of William Sheather and Martha Ticehurst, on Saturday, 1 October 1803 at Catsfield, Sussex, EnglandG.1

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1803As of 1 October 1803, her married name was Sheather.1

Family with

Henry Sheather b. 8 Jun 1778, d. 4 May 1852
Children
ChartsDescendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Last Edited4 Sep 2001

Citations

  1. [S51] Various, Sheather List, record # 11.
  2. [S161] Louise Staley, "Thomas Sheather," e-mail to Robert Mote, 11 August 2000, Record # 4.
  3. [S254] Letter, Heather Hicks to Robert Mote, 19 August 2001.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Rosina Alice May James1

F, #20642, b. 29 May 1903, d. 31 March 2002
FatherWalter Sydney James1 b. 9 Jun 1871, d. 21 Oct 1952
MotherChristiana Martin1 b. 11 Sep 1877, d. 8 Aug 1975
Relationships3rd cousin 1 time removed of Robert Mote
3rd great-granddaughter of James Thomas John Bean

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth29 May 1903Rosina Alice May James was born on Friday, 29 May 1903 at Green's Road, Kellyville, NSW, AustraliaG.1,2
She was the daughter of Walter Sydney James and Christiana Martin.1
Marriage1923Rosina Alice May was married to Robert John Beaumont Fayers in 1923 at Parramatta, NSW, AustraliaG.3
Death31 March 2002Rosina Alice May James died on Sunday, 31 March 2002 at The Adventist Retirement Village, Victoria Point, QLD, AustraliaG, at age 98.4

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1923As of 1923, her married name was Fayers.3
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Last Edited23 Apr 2002

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Birth Registration: Parramatta, Registration Year: 1903, Registration Number: 24058.
  2. [S156] Descendants of Sydney George James, Ancestors List.
  3. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Marriage Registration: Parramatta, Registration Year: 1923, Registration Number: 8905.
  4. [S156] Descendants of Sydney George James, From e-mail dated 22 April 2002.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Keith Martin James1

M, #20643, b. 27 October 1906, d. 7 July 1999
FatherWalter Sydney James1 b. 9 Jun 1871, d. 21 Oct 1952
MotherChristiana Martin1 b. 11 Sep 1877, d. 8 Aug 1975
Relationships3rd cousin 1 time removed of Robert Mote
3rd great-grandson of James Thomas John Bean

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth27 October 1906Keith Martin James was born at 5:15 am on Saturday, 27 October 1906 at Green's Road, Kellyville, NSW, AustraliaG.2
He was the son of Walter Sydney James and Christiana Martin.1
Marriage5 October 1929Keith Martin was married to Phyllis Margaret Bade on Saturday, 5 October 1929 at Pymble, NSW, AustraliaG.3
Death7 July 1999Keith Martin James died on Wednesday, 7 July 1999 at the hospital, Toukley, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 92.3
BurialHe was buried at the Seventh-Day Adventist Cemetery, Cooranbong, NSW, AustraliaG.4

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
Article8 July 1999The following was read by his daughter, Gwen, at his funeral at the cemetery at Cooranbong, NSW on 9th July 1999:
Keith Martin James was born to Christiana and Walter James on October 27, 1906. He was their second child. His older sister, Rosina, is still alive, aged 96, but his younger brother, Sydney George died in 1962 aged 49.

The James family lived at Kellyville where they earned their living by farming. They supplemented their income by catching and selling birds to pet shops. Both Walter and Christiana were from large families and their household was always busy with visiting extended family. Their's was a very hospitable home.

One of Keith's favourite stories was, when he started school, at age seven, he was caned on the very first day because he couldn't spell HAWK correctly. Not impressed with this treatment he refused to go back for the next couple of weeks. However, he became a reasonably good student and was quick at maths. On deciding to become a farmer he finished his formal education at twelve and worked along with his father.

In 1928 he moved to Tumbi Umbi, married Phyllis Bade in 1929, and they continued to live there for the next 47 years. He first met Phyllis at Mr Showe's school and they met again at Church Camp Meeting.

Four children were born - Nancy in 1932, Wally in 1934, Gwen in 1936 and Joy in 1943.

With a pair of Harrier hounds he would spend time hunting foxes, rabbits, possums, kangaroos and any other animals that threatened his crops of beans, peas and tomatoes. Later on he grew gladioli which he sold to the local florist. The other hobby Keith indulged in was fishing and he continued to go fishing until about eight years ago when he found walking on the beach just too tiring. He wasn't all that keen on eating fish and gave most of his catch away.

Cousin Perce was Keith's best mate and they shared many adventures while they were growing up. They built a boat together, which they would row out to sea hopefully to get a better catch. Wally would often accompany them on these fishing trips but sometimes he would have to be rowed back to the shore as he was prone to sea sickness. He eventually worked out a way to beat it. Gradually, as their finances improved, they bought a bigger boat and a twenty horse power outboard motor. Perce died over twenty years ago and Keith missed him greatly.

When Keith was eighteen he had typhoid fever. While he was convalescing, his mother bought him a book on how to play the organ. He used this time to learn and practice until he was proficient enough to play the organ at church. He continued to play until in his eighties. These last few years he wouldn't play as he couldn't bear to hear the mistakes his fingers were making. He sang harmony, had a pleasant voice and could still sing his part in his favourite hymns. Mum and Dad used to sing duets together when they were young and we loved to hear them sing.

Little things we have remembered about him over the years when we were growing up...

He would repair our shoes. His mouth would be full of tacks and we would watch as he nailed each tack into place. Just when we thought his mouth would be empty by now he would produce another tack.

He made his own sinkers in the kitchen at night. Another job we loved to watch him do. Judging by the amount of lead he still had in his shed I think he had planned to make a lot more sinkers.

He seldom raised his voice at us. Although we did get the odd clip in the ear and he kept a strap on a nail on the kitchen wall which was applied when necessary.

To call us he would put two fingers in his mouth and whistle. We were expected to respond pronto.

He couldn't bear to let a snake go free. We have vivid recollections of Father bringing home dead snakes to show us. We were also allowed to keep a few odd pets, a wallaby, a sugar glider possum, a small, harmless snake, although none of them survived for a great deal of time. Maybe the cat, Nigger, had something to do with that.

Because it was a time when doctors were not readily available in our part of the country, Keith did a home nursing course and had his first-aid kit ready when it was needed. When Wally, about 12 at the time, cut his foot with the axe while chopping wood, Keith was able to sew it up. He boiled up some of Mum's cotton and a needle and the entire operation took place on the verandah bed. It must have been painful as Wal made a lot of noise.

We had a happy family life and we have good memories. Nancy was the caring older sister, wally, the son that all fathers want, Joy the adorable little sister and I fitted somewhere in the middle.

As the children grew up and left home it was a bit lonely on the farm. Dad had taken a full time job at the Citrus Co-op in Wyong and retirement was fast approaching. In 1976 they sold the farm and moved to Mannering Park where Dad continued to farm on a much smaller scale. We all ate his home grown tomatoes and pumpkins. He still attended the church he loved at The Entrance. Sabbath School time found him in his place in the second row among the friends that he held most dear.

It is nearly two years now since our mother died. He found it hard going alone. He said he would be able to manage as he lived on his own before, in 1928 for 18 months, and he knew how to cook. He didn't manage very well after all this time and became just so lonely; a loneliness we couldn't fill, lonely for his mate and happy years past. He was no longer able to read his precious Bible and even the many birds he used to feed from his hands every day didn't help. He was tired and longed to rest, sure in the knowledge that Jesus would call him from his grave when He comes.

Psalm 127 says, "Lo, Children are an heritage of the Lord: happy is the man that hath his quiver full of them." Our Dad has left an heritage of four children, fourteen grandchildren, thirty two great grandchildren and four great, great grandchildren. He was a simple man, Trusted in God and, for the most part, was content with his life.5
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Last Edited13 Jun 2011

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Birth Registration: Parramatta, Registration Year: 1906, Registration Number: 38035.
  2. [S917] Gwen James, "Keith Martin James," e-mail to Robert Mote, June 2011.
  3. [S156] Descendants of Sydney George James, Ancestors List.
  4. [S156] Descendants of Sydney George James, From e-mail dated 22 April 2002.
  5. [S156] Descendants of Sydney George James, Record # 4.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Sydney George James1

M, #20644, b. 9 May 1913, d. 5 April 1962
FatherWalter Sydney James1 b. 9 Jun 1871, d. 21 Oct 1952
MotherChristiana Martin1 b. 11 Sep 1877, d. 8 Aug 1975
Relationships3rd cousin 1 time removed of Robert Mote
3rd great-grandson of James Thomas John Bean

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth9 May 1913Sydney George James was born on Friday, 9 May 1913 at Green's Road, Kellyville, NSW, AustraliaG.1,2
He was the son of Walter Sydney James and Christiana Martin.1
Marriage25 November 1937Sydney George was married to Muriel Ivy Dowding, daughter of Thomas Francis Dowding and Maud Ethel Guilliard, on Thursday, 25 November 1937 at Seventh Day Adventist Church, Kellyville, NSW, AustraliaG.3,2
Death5 April 1962Sydney George James died on Thursday, 5 April 1962 at District Hospital, Byron Bay, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 48.2

Family with

Muriel Ivy Dowding b. 13 Aug 1914, d. 23 Jun 1994
Children
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Last Edited28 Jul 2000

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Birth Registration: Parramatta, Registration Year: 1913, Registration Number: 21958.
  2. [S156] Descendants of Sydney George James, Record # 0.
  3. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Marriage Registration: Parramatta, Registration Year: 1937, Registration Number: 22988.
  4. [S156] Descendants of Sydney George James, Record # 1.
  5. [S156] Descendants of Sydney George James, Record # 3.
  6. [S156] Descendants of Sydney George James, Record # 3.4.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Robert John Beaumont Fayers1

M, #20645

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Marriage1923Robert John Beaumont was married to Rosina Alice May James, daughter of Walter Sydney James and Christiana Martin, in 1923 at Parramatta, NSW, AustraliaG.1
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Last Edited28 Jul 2000

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Marriage Registration: Parramatta, Registration Year: 1923, Registration Number: 8905.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Muriel Ivy Dowding1

F, #20646, b. 13 August 1914, d. 23 June 1994
FatherThomas Francis Dowding2 b. 27 Nov 1877, d. 14 Aug 1921
MotherMaud Ethel Guilliard2 b. 16 Apr 1886, d. 17 Aug 1916

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth13 August 1914Muriel Ivy Dowding was born on Thursday, 13 August 1914 at "Lauritson", Thomas Street, Chatswood, NSW, AustraliaG.3,4
She was the daughter of Thomas Francis Dowding and Maud Ethel Guilliard.2
Marriage25 November 1937Muriel Ivy was married to Sydney George James, son of Walter Sydney James and Christiana Martin, on Thursday, 25 November 1937 at Seventh Day Adventist Church, Kellyville, NSW, AustraliaG.1,2
Death23 June 1994Muriel Ivy Dowding died on Thursday, 23 June 1994 at Suffolk Park Nursing Park, Byron Bay, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 79.4

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Name VariationMuriel Ivy Dowding was also known as Muriel Ivy Carr.4
Married Name1937As of 25 November 1937, her married name was James.1
Married Name1966As of 11 December 1966, her married name was Peters.4

Family with

Sydney George James b. 9 May 1913, d. 5 Apr 1962
Children
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Last Edited28 Jul 2000

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Marriage Registration: Parramatta, Registration Year: 1937, Registration Number: 22988.
  2. [S156] Descendants of Sydney George James, Record # 0.
  3. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Chatswood; Year: 1914; Number: 30488.
  4. [S156] Descendants of Sydney George James.
  5. [S156] Descendants of Sydney George James, Record # 1.
  6. [S156] Descendants of Sydney George James, Record # 3.
  7. [S156] Descendants of Sydney George James, Record # 3.4.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Thomas James White1

M, #20647, b. circa 1836, d. 12 August 1900
FatherThomas White1 b. 1792, d. 12 Oct 1841
MotherHannah Perks1 b. 14 Oct 1794, d. 10 Dec 1867
Relationships1st cousin 4 times removed of Robert Mote
Nephew of Josiah George Swift Perks

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birthcirca 1836Thomas James White was born circa 1836 at Birmingham, Warwickshire, EnglandG.2
He was the son of Thomas White and Hannah Perks.1
Death12 August 1900Thomas James White died on Sunday, 12 August 1900 at Birmingham, WarwickshireG.1
Burial17 August 1900He was buried on Friday, 17 August 1900 at Key Hill Cemetery, Birmingham, Warwickshire, EnglandG. Before the memorial erected over the grave became derelict and was cleared away in 1954, the inscription read -
     "In memory of Ann wife of Richard Perks who died April 26th (sic) 1839 aged 69 years. Also Thomas White son-in-law of the above who died on October the 12th 1841 aged 53 years. Likewise Richard Millington Perks husband of the above Ann Perks who died on the 13th October 1842 aged 73 years. Hannah White died December 10th 1867 aged 73 years. Thomas James White died August 12th 1900 aged 64 years. Francis White died November 11th 1902 aged 37 years. Mary Ann White died March 18th 1908 aged 68 years. Millicent White daughter of Francis and Mary Ann White died June 30th 1913 aged 16 years".1,3
ChartsDescendant Chart - Richard Millington Perks
Last Edited26 Jul 2016

Citations

  1. [S55] Letter, Superintendent to Mrs M Fabar, 24 November, 1994.
  2. [S55] Letter, Superintendent to Mrs M Fabar, 24 November, 1994, based on his age on the headstone inscription.
  3. [S1036] Paul Andrews, "Family details," e-mail to Robert Mote, July 2016.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Reverend Thomas Paris Fenner

M, #20648, b. 14 July 1814, d. 16 October 1868
FatherThomas Paris Fenner1 b. c 1783, d. 6 Mar 1863
MotherElizabeth Bevan1 b. 1791, d. 1869

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth14 July 1814Reverend Thomas Paris Fenner was born on Thursday, 14 July 1814 at St Marylebone, Middlesex, EnglandG.1
He was the son of Thomas Paris Fenner and Elizabeth Bevan.1
Marriage25 April 1838Thomas Paris was married to Mary Ann Ross, daughter of George Ogilvie Ross and Dorothea Catharina Steyn, on Wednesday, 25 April 1838 at All Saints Church, Fulham, Kensington, EnglandG.1
Death16 October 1868Reverend Thomas Paris Fenner died on Friday, 16 October 1868 at AustraliaG at age 54.1

Family with

Mary Ann Ross b. 20 Sep 1816, d. 1 Jul 1901
Child
Last Edited1 Mar 2009

Citations

  1. [S56] Fenner Index, online http://www.fulwood.u-net.com/

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Mary Ann Ross1

F, #20649, b. 20 September 1816, d. 1 July 1901
FatherGeorge Ogilvie Ross1 b. 1781
MotherDorothea Catharina Steyn1 b. 1785

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth20 September 1816Mary Ann Ross was born on Friday, 20 September 1816 at Cape of Good Hope, South AfricaG.1
She was the daughter of George Ogilvie Ross and Dorothea Catharina Steyn.1
Marriage25 April 1838Mary Ann was married to Reverend Thomas Paris Fenner, son of Thomas Paris Fenner and Elizabeth Bevan, on Wednesday, 25 April 1838 at All Saints Church, Fulham, Kensington, EnglandG.1
Death1 July 1901Mary Ann Ross died on Monday, 1 July 1901 at AustraliaG at age 84.1

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1838As of 25 April 1838, her married name was Fenner.1

Family with

Reverend Thomas Paris Fenner b. 14 Jul 1814, d. 16 Oct 1868
Child
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

Citations

  1. [S56] Fenner Index, online http://www.fulwood.u-net.com/

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Thomas Paris Fenner1

M, #20650, b. circa 1783, d. 6 March 1863
FatherJohn Ellams Fenner1 b. 17 Jun 1750, d. c 1813
MotherMary Paris1 b. b 1759

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birthcirca 1783Thomas Paris Fenner was born circa 1783 at Tunbridge Wells, Kent, EnglandG.1
He was the son of John Ellams Fenner and Mary Paris.1
Marriagecirca 1810Thomas Paris was married to Elizabeth Bevan circa 1810.1
Death6 March 1863Thomas Paris Fenner died on Friday, 6 March 1863 at Linden Lodge, Linden Grove, Nunhead Road, Peckham, Camberwell, EnglandG.1

Family with

Elizabeth Bevan b. 1791, d. 1869
Child
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

Citations

  1. [S56] Fenner Index, online http://www.fulwood.u-net.com/

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Elizabeth Bevan1

F, #20651, b. 1791, d. 1869

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1791Elizabeth Bevan was born in 1791.1
Marriagecirca 1810Elizabeth was married to Thomas Paris Fenner, son of John Ellams Fenner and Mary Paris, circa 1810.1
Death1869Elizabeth Bevan died in 1869.1

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1810As of circa 1810, her married name was Fenner.1

Family with

Thomas Paris Fenner b. c 1783, d. 6 Mar 1863
Child
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

Citations

  1. [S56] Fenner Index, online http://www.fulwood.u-net.com/

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

John Ellams Fenner1

M, #20652, b. 17 June 1750, d. circa 1813
FatherJohn Fenner1 b. 1720
MotherSarah Ellams1 b. 1725

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth17 June 1750John Ellams Fenner was born on Wednesday, 17 June 1750 at East Chiltington, Sussex, EnglandG.1
He was the son of John Fenner and Sarah Ellams.1
Marriage1780John Ellams was married to Mary Paris in 1780 at St Matthew, Friday St, Middlesex, EnglandG.1
Deathcirca 1813John Ellams Fenner died circa 1813 at Tunbridge Wells, EnglandG.1

Family with

Mary Paris b. b 1759
Child
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

Citations

  1. [S56] Fenner Index, online http://www.fulwood.u-net.com/

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Mary Paris1

F, #20653, b. before 1759

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birthbefore 1759Mary Paris was born before 1759.1
Marriage1780Mary was married to John Ellams Fenner, son of John Fenner and Sarah Ellams, in 1780 at St Matthew, Friday St, Middlesex, EnglandG.1

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married NameHer married name was Fenner.1

Family with

John Ellams Fenner b. 17 Jun 1750, d. c 1813
Child
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

Citations

  1. [S56] Fenner Index, online http://www.fulwood.u-net.com/

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

John Fenner1

M, #20654, b. 1720

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1720John Fenner was born in 1720.1
MarriageJohn was married to Sarah Ellams.1

Family with

Sarah Ellams b. 1725
Child
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

Citations

  1. [S56] Fenner Index, online http://www.fulwood.u-net.com/

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Sarah Ellams1

F, #20655, b. 1725

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1725Sarah Ellams was born in 1725.1
MarriageSarah was married to John Fenner.1

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married NameHer married name was Fenner.1

Family with

John Fenner b. 1720
Child
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

Citations

  1. [S56] Fenner Index, online http://www.fulwood.u-net.com/

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

George Ogilvie Ross1

M, #20656, b. 1781

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1781George Ogilvie Ross was born in 1781.1
MarriageGeorge Ogilvie was married to Dorothea Catharina Steyn.1

Family with

Dorothea Catharina Steyn b. 1785
Child
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

Citations

  1. [S56] Fenner Index, online http://www.fulwood.u-net.com/

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Dorothea Catharina Steyn1

F, #20657, b. 1785

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1785Dorothea Catharina Steyn was born in 1785.1
MarriageDorothea Catharina was married to George Ogilvie Ross.1

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married NameHer married name was Ross.1

Family with

George Ogilvie Ross b. 1781
Child
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

Citations

  1. [S56] Fenner Index, online http://www.fulwood.u-net.com/

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

The Steam Ship London

#20659, d. 11 January 1866
The Sinking of the Steam Ship London

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Death11 January 1866The Steam Ship London sank about 2pm on Thursday, 11 January 1866 in The Bay of BiscayG.

Voyages

DateDetails
30 December 1865The Steam Ship London sailed from Gravesend, EnglandG, on Saturday, 30 December 1865 with Elizabeth Shelley and Reverend Daniel James Draper aboard

     The Shipwreck of the "LONDON" - 1866

Many years have elapsed since we have had to record a disaster at sea so terrible in it's details, and involving so wholesale a sacrifice of life, as that which we have today to announce. The event will appear the more appalling to our readers from the fact that a brief ten days ago every one of that ill-fated band of men, women, and children, whose corpses now lie far beneath the ocean wave, were living, active, hopeful, and were gazing on the hills that shut in the Plymouth sound.

Intelligence reached Falmouth yesterday that the fine Australian passenger vessel, the 'London', foundered at sea on Thursday last, and that of her crew and passengers, 289 all told, the only survivors, nineteen in number, had landed at the westermost Channel port. The particulars of the occurrence, as gained from the few who have been left to tell the tale, we proceed to give.

The 'London' was one of the newest and finest of the Australian passenger ships belonging to Messrs. Money, Wigram, and Co., by which eminent firm she was built at their yard at Blackwall.

She was of 1,752 tons register, and was fitted with an auxiliary screw, her engines being of '800 horsepower indicated. She was built in pursuance of the plan for steaming to Australia round the Southern Capes, and she has been lost while on her third voyage to Melbourne.

On her two previous voyages her great excellence as passenger ship has attracted to her a full compliment of passengers- a somewhat greater number even than accompanied her on her present disastrous voyage, and her performances have fully realised the high expectations which were entertained respecting her. Her estimated value, exclusive of a full and valuable cargo was from 70,000 pounds to 80,000 pounds.

She was commanded by Captain J. Bohun Martin, a gentleman in the prime of life, who not only gained a more than ordinary share of respect from the thousands of passengers that had crossed the ocean under his care, but was reputed to be one of the smartest and most trustworthy of the officers employed in the Australian fleet of Messrs. Wigram, of which he was a senior captain. He had previously for several years been engaged in Colonial trade. He was unmarried, having made his ship his inseparable companion, and receiving in the cordial friendship of the passengers who had sailed with him a reward for that assiduous attention to their comfort and safety to which he had ever displayed.

On the 30th of December, under the care of Captain Martin, the 'London' left Gravesend, and encountered on her passage down Channel such severe weather that she was compelled for a short time to take shelter at Spithead. She arrived at Plymouth on the 4th instant, and embarked a large number of passengers, an unusually large proportion of whom were old colonists returning to Australia; who had been awaiting her arrival at the various hotels at Plymouth.

In addition to sixty cabin passengers, she had on board about one hundred and forty second and third-class passengers, which, with the crew of about ninety, made up her compliment of 289 souls on board. The passengers were embarked under the super-intendance of Messrs. J.B. Wilcocks and Co., emigration and shipping agents, of Plymouth. One only, Miss Penny Batchelor, of Union-street, Stonehouse, was from the immediate neighborhood of Plymouth, but there was a large sprinkling of Cornish men and women.
Thus admirably equipped and fully freighted, the London sailed from Plymouth Sound on Saturday, the 6th inst. On the following day she encountered very heavy weather, with rain; boisterous and unsettled weather continuing on the 8th. This increased next day to a gale, during which a series of minor disasters befell her .

The jib-boom ,fore-topmast, top-gallantmast and royal-mast were carried away, and the port lifeboat was washed overboard and lost. This was in the morning, and as the storm was giving no signs of abatement she was at three o'clock next morning put about, Captain Martin intending to run back to Plymouth to refit. About this time, a tremendous sea, which terrified even the most hardened seamen, broke on board, doing great damage; the star-board lifeboat was carried away by the wave, and the cutter stove in.

At noon an observation was taken, the ship being then 46.48 N., and longitude 8.7 West-viz., in the Bay of Biscay, about 200 miles southwest of Land's End. The violent weather continued, and at half-past ten on Wednesday night the ship rolled and pitched fearfully, and shipped such quantities of water on deck as to carry away the engine-room hatch, and the water soon found it's way into the engine-room, putting out the fires, and thus stopping the engines. The pumps were kept incessantly going the whole night, all the passengers who were capable of rendering any help working with the utmost energy to assist the crew to keep the ship afloat, by bailing with buckets in addition to the pumps.

During that frightful night - it will be remembered when thirty vessels were driven ashore in Torbay- the gale increased, if possible, in violence every hour, until it assumed the character of a hurricane, with a fearful cross sea, which incessantly made clean breaches over the hapless vessel. The utmost efforts were made, but without avail, to secure the engine-room hatch, and about four a.m. the stern ports were stove in by the sea, and the exertions made to close them up again were wholly useless. The passengers and crew this whole time behaved exceedingly well, and worked orderly with an energy which showed it was for their lives they strove. But the wa'er continued to increase and all command of the ship was lost, until it became evident that further effort was hopeless.

It was then, at ten o'clock on the morning of that fatal Thursday, that Captain Martin had the terrible task of making known to the 200 passengers that the ship was sinking, and they must prepare for the worst. She was then as low in the water as the main chains. An effort was then made to lower the boats, and the starboard iron pinnance was lowered, with five men aboard her, one of them being a passenger from Penzance. In the terrific sea prevailing she was quickly swamped, and went down, but the five men in her were got on board the ship. This catastrophe had the effect of intimidating the crew from attempting to launch the three remaining boats, and all on board began to realise the dreadful fate which impended.

The whole of the passengers and crew gathered as with one consent to the chief saloon, and having been told calmly by Captain Martin that there was no hope left, a remarkable and unanimous spirit of resignation came over them at once. There was no screaming or shrieking by women or men, no rushing on deck, or frantic cries, all calmly resorted to the saloon, where the Rev. Mr. Draper, one of the passengers, prayed aloud, and exhorted the unhappy creatures by whom he was surrounded. Dismay was present to every heart but disorder to none. Mothers were weeping sadly over the little ones about with them to be engulfed, and the children, ignorant of their coming death, were pitifully enquiring the cause of so much woe. Friends were taking leave of friends, as if preparing for a long journey, others were crouched down with Bibles in their hands, endeavoring to snatch consolation from passages long known or long neglected.

Incredible, we are told, was the composure which, under such circumstances, reigned around. Captain Martin stationed himself in the poop, going occasionally forward, or into the saloon; but to none could he offer a word of comfort, by telling then that their safety was even probable. He joined now and then for a few moments in the public devotions, but his place to the last was on the deck.

About two o'clock in the afternoon, the water gaining fast on the ship, and no signs of the storm subsiding being apparent, a small band of men determined to trust themselves to the mercy of the waves in a boat rather that go down without a struggle. Leaving the saloon, therefore, they got out and lowered the port cutter, into which sixteen of the crew and 3 of the passengers succeeded in getting, and in launching her clear of the ship. These nineteen men shouted to the captain to come with them, but with that heroic courage which was his chief characteristic, he declined to go with them, saying, " No, I will go down with the passengers; but I wish you God speed and safe to land."

The boat then pulled away, tossing about helplessly on the crests of the gigantic waves. Scarcely had they gone eighty yards, or been five minutes off the deck, when the fine steamer went down stern foremost with her crowd of human beings, from whom one confused cry of helpless terror arose, and all was silent forever.

Mention was made on Wednesday of the Rev. Mr. Draper's exhortations to the unhappy people in the chief saloon. The women sat around him reading Bibles with the children, and occasionally some man or woman would step up to Mr. Draper and say, "Pray with me Mr. Draper," -a request that was always complied with. Up to the time the ship went down the reverend gentlemen ministered to those among whom he moved constantly. He was heard to say repeatedly, "Oh, God, may those that are not converted be converted now- hundreds of them!"
After the pinnace had got away from the 'London', and in a brief interval before she foundered, a rush was seen to be made to the two remaining boats, but the efforts to launch them were ineffectual, and the suddenness of the foundering at last- the 'London' being an iron ship- prevented what might have been a successful second attempt to save a few more lives. The nineteen survivors, in their little life boat, were driven before the gale in the Bay of Biscay all that Thursday afternoon, and evening, and night, tossed on the back of tremendous seas, and when daylight on Friday morning came there was still no rescue, nor much hope of living out the gale. At about eleven a.m. on Friday, the 12th, however, a vessel hove in sight, and the attention of it's crew being attracted to the boat were picked up, after twenty hours' exposure to the pitiless winds and waves.

The vessel proved to be the 'Marianople', Captain Carasa, an Italian barque, on board which the survivors received the utmost attention and kindness, and from which they were put ashore at Falmouth yesterday afternoon, the chief engineer and three passengers at once proceeded on to London by the small train.

Some hair-breadth escapes in connection with this disaster are already known. A lady who was desirous of proceeding from Plymouth with her family to Melbourne by the 'London' had made repeated pressing applications to the owners agents at Plymouth, and the captain had been consulted, but, fortunately for the applicant, had declared that his cabins were so full that he could not possibly accommodate her, a result that, at that time, caused her much disappointment. A second-class male passenger was so alarmed at the rough weather which the 'London' encountered on her way down to Plymouth, that immediately on her arrival to that port he came ashore, resigned his passage, and went back to his home, thus unwittingly saving his life. A young man, as the result of some family quarrel, left his home, and took a passage by the London. He was advertised for the times, and importuned to return, his friends being unaware of his whereabouts. Messengers were sent down to Plymouth , and an influential shipbroker in the town was employed to intercept him should he attempt to sail thence. Fortunately he was detected amongst the passengers of the London, and his family communicated with by the broker, the result of which that a brother of the young man came down to Plymouth, and persuaded the would-be emigrant to forego his voyage.

From the The Belfast Gazette.1866.
Last Edited19 Jul 2011

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Alfred A N Martin

M, #20660, b. circa 1885, d. before 1952

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birthcirca 1885Alfred A N Martin was born circa 1885 at EnglandG.
EngagementGARAGE ROMANCE

Presentation to Mr. A. Martin and Miss D. I. Aspland

Almost the entire staff of the garage of Messrs. J. H. Nice, and Co., Ltd., of St. Mary's-street, Ely,assembled at the Cutter Inn on Monday evening, to celebrate the forthcoming marriage of two of the best-known of their members.

Miss D. J. (Rene) Aspland:, who for a number of years has been in charge of the office at the garage, has now left in order to marry tomorrow, (Saturday), Mr. A. A. N. (Alf) Martin, who has been in charge of the works department for many years.

Following a few words of welcome from the manager (Mr. J. P. Stow) Mr. Geoffrey Nice, former manager of the branch and now joint managing director of the firm, paid glowing tribute to the work of Mr. Martin and Miss Aspland for the firm and said in particular, how much all would miss the help and co-operation of Miss Aspland. He brought with him a I special message of congratulations and good wishes from the directors. As a climax to the evening's proceedings, Mr. Nice, on behalf of the entire staff at Ely, made a presentation of a chiming clock and cutlery to Miss Aspland and Mr. Martin, both of whom made suitable replies, They were accorded musical honours and a most enjoyable evening was spent.
Marriagecirca 1929He married Doris Irene Aspland, daughter of Richard Aspland and Frances Watson, circa 1929 at St Mary's Church, Ely, Cambridgeshire, EnglandG.

ELY WEDDING

Mr. A. Martin and Miss D. I. Aspland

The marriage took place at St. Mary's Church, Ely, on Saturday, the Rev. J. B. Rowsell officiating, of Miss Doris Irene Aspland, youngest daughter of Mrs. Aspland and the late Mr. R. Aspland of Hill's-lane, Ely, to Mr. Alfred Martin. son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Martin, of Willow-walk, Ely.

Given away.by her brother, Mr. P. S. Aspland, the bride was attired in     a
Pastel blue two-piece, with hat and shoes to match. She wore a spray of pink carnations and carried an ivory prayer book.

Mrs. V. M. Mudd, matron of honour, wearing a pink ensemble with black accessories, attended the bride. Mr. C. Barton was best man.

As the couple left the Church a guard of honour was formed and Masters Anthony Mudd and Michael Bunting presented the bride with silver horseshoes.

Later 50 guests attended the reception at the Cutter Inn.

When the couple left for their honeymoon at Bournemouth the bride was wearing a floral design dress and beige fur fabric coat.

The bridegroom's gift to the bride was a gold wrist watch and the bridegroom received a gold signet ring from the bride.

They were the recipients of numerous preisents, cheques and congratulatory telegrams, the gifts including a chiming clock and cutlery from the staff of Messrs. T. H. Nice, and Co., St. Mary's-street, Ely.
Deathbefore 1952Alfred A N Martin died before 1952 at Ely, Cambridgeshire, EnglandG.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
NicknameAlfred A N Martin was often called Alf.
ChartsDescendant Chart - Allexsander Aspland
Last Edited28 Aug 2009

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.