Elsie M Dunn1

F, #18521, b. 1885, d. 1893
FatherBenjamin Edward Dunn1 b. 2 Dec 1863, d. 25 Nov 1920
MotherCatherine Graham1 d. 15 Oct 1900
Relationships4th cousin 1 time removed of Robert Mote
3rd great-granddaughter of James Thomas John Bean

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1885Elsie M Dunn was born in 1885 at Sydney, NSW, AustraliaG.1
She was the daughter of Benjamin Edward Dunn and Catherine Graham.1
Death1893Elsie M Dunn died in 1893 at Newtown, NSW, AustraliaG.2

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
End-LineElsie M Dunn has no known descendants.
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Last Edited6 Jul 2000

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Birth Registration: Sydney; Year: 1885; No: 346.
  2. [S139] Perry McIntyre & Adele Cathro, Thomas Dunn's Descendants, page: 175.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Clive Dunn1

M, #18522, b. 1886, d. 1886
FatherBenjamin Edward Dunn1 b. 2 Dec 1863, d. 25 Nov 1920
MotherCatherine Graham1 d. 15 Oct 1900
Relationships4th cousin 1 time removed of Robert Mote
3rd great-grandson of James Thomas John Bean

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Death1886Clive Dunn died in 1886 at Tamworth, NSW, AustraliaG.2
Birth1886He was born in 1886 at Sydney, NSW, AustraliaG.1
He was the son of Benjamin Edward Dunn and Catherine Graham.1

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
End-LineClive Dunn has no known descendants.
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Last Edited6 Jul 2000

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Birth Registration: Sydney; Year: 1886; No: 2382.
  2. [S139] Perry McIntyre & Adele Cathro, Thomas Dunn's Descendants, page: 175.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Mary McPherson

F, #18523, d. 10 March 1843

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Marriagecirca 1830Mary was married to John McInnes, son of Angus McInnes and Isabella McKinnon, circa 1830 at ScotlandG; Based on age of eldest child on death certificate.
Death10 March 1843Mary McPherson died on Friday, 10 March 1843 at Campbelltown, NSW, AustraliaG.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1830As of circa 1830, her married name was McInnes.

Voyages

DateDetails
6 July 1837Mary McPherson was a passenger aboard The Ship William Nicol which sailed from Isleornsay, Isle of Skye, ScotlandG, on Thursday, 6 July 1837 with 321 passengers aboard and arrived in Sydney on 27 October 1837.

The William Nicol (408 tons commanded by Captain John McAlpine) had been purpose built and was the first ship to be chartered by the Government for carrying aided emigrants to a new life in the Antipodes. The Edinburgh Courier of 10 July 1837 reported on the embarkation on Monday 3 July 1837 at Ornsay on the Isle of Skye and described the ship as being fitted in the most commodius manner possible and all who visited her were satisfied that the comforts of all the emigrants has been minutely attended to. She was furnished to accommodate 250 adult passengers, each being allowed 18 inches width to sleep in!

The ship set sail three days after embarkation, carrying in all 323 passengers of which 69 were men, 75 women, 72 children aged seven and above and 107 under sevens. For sleeping purposes two children over seven and three under, equated to one adult. On top of this there was the crew who had their own quarters amongst whom was the ship's doctor and surgeon, Dr George Roberts of the Royal Navy. The good doctor must have had big problems with his emigrant patients as they were all, by and large, gaelic speaking and according to reports, two shepherds of good character were given cabins as they were to act as interpreters. A midwife, a Mrs McDonald, undertook to act in similar capacity for the women and children.

During the voyage it appears that everyone spent as much time on deck as they could to escape the overcrowded and evil-smelling sleeping quarters which were on the same deck as the hospital. Below deck was fumigated as often as possible and, whenever practical, aired. The deck of the sleeping quarters were scraped daily in an effort to keep the area clean. The doctor, although not being specific, stated that the people were not very clean in their habits. His log shows that as the ship sailed into the tropics the smell, along with the suffering, increased with the heat. The young children, in particular, were hard hit.

The diet on board was not what the children were used to and although they didn't get scurvy, they suffered bouts of fever and diarrhoea and frequently refused food. At home in Scotland they had been used to milk, vegetables and porridge but whilst on board they had biscuits with salt beef and pork. Looking through the doctor's log, large numbers seem to have suffered at first from sea sickness but it soon became apparent that the women and children were suffering most. In the beginning constipation was the most common problem but diarrhoea soon took over as the chief complaint. Fever and sickness often followed in its wake and, with the very young, sometimes resulted in death. There were 19 deaths during the voyage; all children under the age of six apart from the two women who died after childbirth.

After 66 days at sea, the William Nicol put into port at the Cape of Good Hope on 11 September 1837 to take on fresh water. The Governor, Sir Benjamin D'Urban, was horrified at the conditions on board and instigated a private collection to help the emigrants. £150 was raised in one day and was used to buy, amongst other things, changes of clothing as well as sago and rice. Dr Roberts, himself, arranged for fresh beef and vegetables to be bought to supplement the children's diet; the receipts were sent back to London for payment. After four days the ship continued the voyage and arrived in Port Jackson on 28 October. The doctor's log records, the emigrants throughout were in perfect health when they were discharged the following day.

Family with

John McInnes b. 1796, d. 24 Sep 1874
Children
ChartsDescendant Chart - Angus McInnes
Last Edited18 Feb 2008

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Angus McInnes1

M, #18524, b. 1831, d. 9 March 1888
FatherJohn McInnes b. 1796, d. 24 Sep 1874
MotherMary McPherson d. 10 Mar 1843
RelationshipGrandson of Angus McInnes

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1831Angus McInnes was born in 1831 at Isle of Skye, ScotlandG.
He was the son of John McInnes and Mary McPherson.
Death9 March 1888Angus McInnes died on Friday, 9 March 1888 at Railway Station, Picton, NSW, AustraliaG.
Burial10 March 1888He was buried on 10 March 1888 at Picton, NSW, AustraliaG; the undertaker was William Warters and the Minister was Rev. R Noake (Church of England). Witnesses were Jonathan McInnes and Lauchlan Nicolson (a farmer at Fairy Hill near Picton.)

Voyages

DateDetails
6 July 1837Angus McInnes was a passenger aboard The Ship William Nicol which sailed from Isleornsay, Isle of Skye, ScotlandG, on Thursday, 6 July 1837 with 321 passengers aboard and arrived in Sydney on 27 October 1837.

The William Nicol (408 tons commanded by Captain John McAlpine) had been purpose built and was the first ship to be chartered by the Government for carrying aided emigrants to a new life in the Antipodes. The Edinburgh Courier of 10 July 1837 reported on the embarkation on Monday 3 July 1837 at Ornsay on the Isle of Skye and described the ship as being fitted in the most commodius manner possible and all who visited her were satisfied that the comforts of all the emigrants has been minutely attended to. She was furnished to accommodate 250 adult passengers, each being allowed 18 inches width to sleep in!

The ship set sail three days after embarkation, carrying in all 323 passengers of which 69 were men, 75 women, 72 children aged seven and above and 107 under sevens. For sleeping purposes two children over seven and three under, equated to one adult. On top of this there was the crew who had their own quarters amongst whom was the ship's doctor and surgeon, Dr George Roberts of the Royal Navy. The good doctor must have had big problems with his emigrant patients as they were all, by and large, gaelic speaking and according to reports, two shepherds of good character were given cabins as they were to act as interpreters. A midwife, a Mrs McDonald, undertook to act in similar capacity for the women and children.

During the voyage it appears that everyone spent as much time on deck as they could to escape the overcrowded and evil-smelling sleeping quarters which were on the same deck as the hospital. Below deck was fumigated as often as possible and, whenever practical, aired. The deck of the sleeping quarters were scraped daily in an effort to keep the area clean. The doctor, although not being specific, stated that the people were not very clean in their habits. His log shows that as the ship sailed into the tropics the smell, along with the suffering, increased with the heat. The young children, in particular, were hard hit.

The diet on board was not what the children were used to and although they didn't get scurvy, they suffered bouts of fever and diarrhoea and frequently refused food. At home in Scotland they had been used to milk, vegetables and porridge but whilst on board they had biscuits with salt beef and pork. Looking through the doctor's log, large numbers seem to have suffered at first from sea sickness but it soon became apparent that the women and children were suffering most. In the beginning constipation was the most common problem but diarrhoea soon took over as the chief complaint. Fever and sickness often followed in its wake and, with the very young, sometimes resulted in death. There were 19 deaths during the voyage; all children under the age of six apart from the two women who died after childbirth.

After 66 days at sea, the William Nicol put into port at the Cape of Good Hope on 11 September 1837 to take on fresh water. The Governor, Sir Benjamin D'Urban, was horrified at the conditions on board and instigated a private collection to help the emigrants. £150 was raised in one day and was used to buy, amongst other things, changes of clothing as well as sago and rice. Dr Roberts, himself, arranged for fresh beef and vegetables to be bought to supplement the children's diet; the receipts were sent back to London for payment. After four days the ship continued the voyage and arrived in Port Jackson on 28 October. The doctor's log records, the emigrants throughout were in perfect health when they were discharged the following day.

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
NoteAngus McInnes Death Certificate states he was never married.
End-LineHe has no known descendants.
ChartsDescendant Chart - Angus McInnes
Last Edited28 Jul 2007

Citations

  1. As per father's death certificate.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Finlay McInnes

M, #18525
FatherJohn McInnes b. 1796, d. 24 Sep 1874
MotherMary McPherson d. 10 Mar 1843
RelationshipGrandson of Angus McInnes

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Finlay McInnes was the son of John McInnes and Mary McPherson.

Voyages

DateDetails
6 July 1837Finlay McInnes was a passenger aboard The Ship William Nicol which sailed from Isleornsay, Isle of Skye, ScotlandG, on Thursday, 6 July 1837 with 321 passengers aboard and arrived in Sydney on 27 October 1837.

The William Nicol (408 tons commanded by Captain John McAlpine) had been purpose built and was the first ship to be chartered by the Government for carrying aided emigrants to a new life in the Antipodes. The Edinburgh Courier of 10 July 1837 reported on the embarkation on Monday 3 July 1837 at Ornsay on the Isle of Skye and described the ship as being fitted in the most commodius manner possible and all who visited her were satisfied that the comforts of all the emigrants has been minutely attended to. She was furnished to accommodate 250 adult passengers, each being allowed 18 inches width to sleep in!

The ship set sail three days after embarkation, carrying in all 323 passengers of which 69 were men, 75 women, 72 children aged seven and above and 107 under sevens. For sleeping purposes two children over seven and three under, equated to one adult. On top of this there was the crew who had their own quarters amongst whom was the ship's doctor and surgeon, Dr George Roberts of the Royal Navy. The good doctor must have had big problems with his emigrant patients as they were all, by and large, gaelic speaking and according to reports, two shepherds of good character were given cabins as they were to act as interpreters. A midwife, a Mrs McDonald, undertook to act in similar capacity for the women and children.

During the voyage it appears that everyone spent as much time on deck as they could to escape the overcrowded and evil-smelling sleeping quarters which were on the same deck as the hospital. Below deck was fumigated as often as possible and, whenever practical, aired. The deck of the sleeping quarters were scraped daily in an effort to keep the area clean. The doctor, although not being specific, stated that the people were not very clean in their habits. His log shows that as the ship sailed into the tropics the smell, along with the suffering, increased with the heat. The young children, in particular, were hard hit.

The diet on board was not what the children were used to and although they didn't get scurvy, they suffered bouts of fever and diarrhoea and frequently refused food. At home in Scotland they had been used to milk, vegetables and porridge but whilst on board they had biscuits with salt beef and pork. Looking through the doctor's log, large numbers seem to have suffered at first from sea sickness but it soon became apparent that the women and children were suffering most. In the beginning constipation was the most common problem but diarrhoea soon took over as the chief complaint. Fever and sickness often followed in its wake and, with the very young, sometimes resulted in death. There were 19 deaths during the voyage; all children under the age of six apart from the two women who died after childbirth.

After 66 days at sea, the William Nicol put into port at the Cape of Good Hope on 11 September 1837 to take on fresh water. The Governor, Sir Benjamin D'Urban, was horrified at the conditions on board and instigated a private collection to help the emigrants. £150 was raised in one day and was used to buy, amongst other things, changes of clothing as well as sago and rice. Dr Roberts, himself, arranged for fresh beef and vegetables to be bought to supplement the children's diet; the receipts were sent back to London for payment. After four days the ship continued the voyage and arrived in Port Jackson on 28 October. The doctor's log records, the emigrants throughout were in perfect health when they were discharged the following day.

ChartsDescendant Chart - Angus McInnes
Last Edited13 Jan 2011

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Adani Mahala Fairhall1

F, #18526, d. 31 July 1943
FatherGeorge Harold Edward Fairhall1 b. 14 Oct 1889, d. 6 Aug 1958
MotherNaomi Mahala Coote1 b. 14 Jan 1889, d. 8 Feb 1920
Relationships5th cousin 2 times removed of Robert Mote
7th great-granddaughter of Thomas Sheather

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
BurialAdani Mahala Fairhall was buried at Church of England Portion, Morpeth Cemetery, NSW, AustraliaG.1
BirthShe was born.1
She was the daughter of George Harold Edward Fairhall and Naomi Mahala Coote.1
Death31 July 1943Adani Mahala Fairhall died on Saturday, 31 July 1943 at Morpeth, NSW, AustraliaG.1

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
NoteAdani Mahala Fairhall PARENTS NOT CONFIRMED: assumed because of second given name, time and location.1
ChartsDescendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Last Edited22 Aug 1999

Citations

  1. [S26] Bruce W Fairhall, 3 Jan 1999.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

David Allen Hughes1

M, #18527, b. 1850, d. 7 January 1924

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1850David Allen Hughes was born in 1850.1,2
Marriage26 November 1879He was married to Margaret Jane Sheather, daughter of James Sheather and Mercy Mary Albury, on Wednesday, 26 November 1879 at Methodist Church, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaG.3,4
Divorce4 January 1918David Allen Hughes and Margaret Jane Sheather were divorced on 4 January 1918.5
Death7 January 1924David Allen Hughes died on Monday, 7 January 1924 at Lidcombe, NSW, AustraliaG.2,5

Family with

Margaret Jane Sheather b. 18 Apr 1857, d. 6 Jun 1931
Children
ChartsDescendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Last Edited7 Jun 2006

Citations

  1. [S26] Bruce W Fairhall, 3 Jan 1999.
  2. [S467] Victor Cyril Cottle, "M J Sheather's Descendants," e-mail to Robert Mote, 3 June 2004.
  3. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Marriage Registration: Sydney, Registration Year: 1879, Registration Number: 1249.
  4. [S51] Various, Sheather List, Record: 117.
  5. [S405] Sylvia Anderson, "Tisdell, Unicomb & Witchard Families," e-mail to Robert Mote, 5 September 2003.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Malcolm McInnes

M, #18528, b. 1835, d. 1907
FatherJohn McInnes b. 1796, d. 24 Sep 1874
MotherMary McPherson d. 10 Mar 1843
RelationshipGrandson of Angus McInnes

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1835Malcolm McInnes was born in 1835 at Isle of Skye, ScotlandG.
He was the son of John McInnes and Mary McPherson.
Baptism15 June 1835Malcolm McInnes was baptized on Monday, 15 June 1835 at Sleat, Inverness, ScotlandG; IGI - C111152.
Death1907He died in 1907 at Picton, NSW, AustraliaG.

Voyages

DateDetails
6 July 1837Malcolm McInnes was a passenger aboard The Ship William Nicol which sailed from Isleornsay, Isle of Skye, ScotlandG, on Thursday, 6 July 1837 with 321 passengers aboard and arrived in Sydney on 27 October 1837.

The William Nicol (408 tons commanded by Captain John McAlpine) had been purpose built and was the first ship to be chartered by the Government for carrying aided emigrants to a new life in the Antipodes. The Edinburgh Courier of 10 July 1837 reported on the embarkation on Monday 3 July 1837 at Ornsay on the Isle of Skye and described the ship as being fitted in the most commodius manner possible and all who visited her were satisfied that the comforts of all the emigrants has been minutely attended to. She was furnished to accommodate 250 adult passengers, each being allowed 18 inches width to sleep in!

The ship set sail three days after embarkation, carrying in all 323 passengers of which 69 were men, 75 women, 72 children aged seven and above and 107 under sevens. For sleeping purposes two children over seven and three under, equated to one adult. On top of this there was the crew who had their own quarters amongst whom was the ship's doctor and surgeon, Dr George Roberts of the Royal Navy. The good doctor must have had big problems with his emigrant patients as they were all, by and large, gaelic speaking and according to reports, two shepherds of good character were given cabins as they were to act as interpreters. A midwife, a Mrs McDonald, undertook to act in similar capacity for the women and children.

During the voyage it appears that everyone spent as much time on deck as they could to escape the overcrowded and evil-smelling sleeping quarters which were on the same deck as the hospital. Below deck was fumigated as often as possible and, whenever practical, aired. The deck of the sleeping quarters were scraped daily in an effort to keep the area clean. The doctor, although not being specific, stated that the people were not very clean in their habits. His log shows that as the ship sailed into the tropics the smell, along with the suffering, increased with the heat. The young children, in particular, were hard hit.

The diet on board was not what the children were used to and although they didn't get scurvy, they suffered bouts of fever and diarrhoea and frequently refused food. At home in Scotland they had been used to milk, vegetables and porridge but whilst on board they had biscuits with salt beef and pork. Looking through the doctor's log, large numbers seem to have suffered at first from sea sickness but it soon became apparent that the women and children were suffering most. In the beginning constipation was the most common problem but diarrhoea soon took over as the chief complaint. Fever and sickness often followed in its wake and, with the very young, sometimes resulted in death. There were 19 deaths during the voyage; all children under the age of six apart from the two women who died after childbirth.

After 66 days at sea, the William Nicol put into port at the Cape of Good Hope on 11 September 1837 to take on fresh water. The Governor, Sir Benjamin D'Urban, was horrified at the conditions on board and instigated a private collection to help the emigrants. £150 was raised in one day and was used to buy, amongst other things, changes of clothing as well as sago and rice. Dr Roberts, himself, arranged for fresh beef and vegetables to be bought to supplement the children's diet; the receipts were sent back to London for payment. After four days the ship continued the voyage and arrived in Port Jackson on 28 October. The doctor's log records, the emigrants throughout were in perfect health when they were discharged the following day.

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
OccupationMalcolm McInnes was a blacksmith at Picton, NSW, AustraliaG.
Occupation1869He was a blacksmith (as per Picton Bench Records) in 1869 at Menangle, NSW, AustraliaG.
ChartsDescendant Chart - Angus McInnes
Last Edited28 Jul 2007

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Ethel Margaret Nelson

F, #18529, b. 21 April 1883
FatherAndrew Nelson b. c 1860
MotherMary Matilda Sheather b. 21 Jan 1859, d. 28 Dec 1894
Relationships4th cousin 3 times removed of Robert Mote
6th great-granddaughter of Thomas Sheather

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth21 April 1883Ethel Margaret Nelson was born on Saturday, 21 April 1883 at Granville, NSW, AustraliaG.1,2
She was the daughter of Andrew Nelson and Mary Matilda Sheather.
Marriage8 May 1902Ethel Margaret was married to Thomas Skinner, son of George Skinner and Ann Moulds, on Thursday, 8 May 1902 at Rouse Hill, NSW, AustraliaG.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1902As of 8 May 1902, her married name was Skinner.
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Descendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Last Edited11 Jun 2006

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Birth Registration: Central Cumberland; Year: 1883; Number: 15261.
  2. [S405] Sylvia Anderson, "Tisdell, Unicomb & Witchard Families," e-mail to Robert Mote, 5 September 2003.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Ann McInnes

F, #18530, b. 16 February 1838, d. 1932
FatherJohn McInnes b. 1796, d. 24 Sep 1874
MotherMary McPherson d. 10 Mar 1843
RelationshipGranddaughter of Angus McInnes

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth16 February 1838Ann McInnes was born on Friday, 16 February 1838 at Sydney, NSW, AustraliaG.
She was the daughter of John McInnes and Mary McPherson.
Marriage7 March 1860Ann McInnes was married to Robert Jabez Robertson Plows, son of Thomas Plows and Jane Stanton, on Wednesday, 7 March 1860 at Clifton, NSW, AustraliaG.1
Death1932Ann McInnes died in 1932 at Gundagai, NSW, AustraliaG.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1860As of 7 March 1860, her married name was Plows.

Family with

Robert Jabez Robertson Plows b. 1836, d. 1901
Children
ChartsDescendant Chart - Angus McInnes
Last Edited4 Jun 2001

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Picton; Year: 1860; Number: 2441.
  2. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Camden; Year: 1862; Number: 6650.
  3. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Picton; Year: 1864; Number: 13757.
  4. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Picton; Year: 1866; Number: 13760.
  5. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Picton; Year: 1868; Number: 15250.
  6. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Picton; Year: 1870; Number: 15792.
  7. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Gundagai; Year: 1876; Number: 12643.
  8. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Gundagai; Year: 1884; Number: 20418.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Thomas Plows

M, #18531, b. 1798, d. 23 June 1860

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1798Thomas Plows was born in 1798 at Suffolk, EnglandG.
Marriage13 January 1827Thomas was married to Jane Stanton, daughter of James Stanton and Frances Haggart, on Saturday, 13 January 1827 at St Peter's C of E Parish, Campbelltown, NSW, AustraliaG.1
Marriage1850Thomas was married to Bridget Connor in 1850 at St Peter's Parish, Campbelltown, NSW, AustraliaG.2
Death23 June 1860Thomas Plows died on Saturday, 23 June 1860 at Camden, NSW, AustraliaG.3
Burial24 June 1860He was buried on 24 June 1860 at Campbelltown, NSW, AustraliaG.

Criminal Record

DatePlaceDetails
1816Middlesex, EnglandGThomas Plows was put on trial, found guilty and sentenced to seven years in 1816 at Middlesex, EnglandG.

Voyages

DateDetails
1816Thomas Plows was a convict aboard The Ship Sir William Bensley which sailed from EnglandG in 1816 and arrived in Sydney on 10 March 1817. The Master was Lew E Williams. On 21 March 1817 the convicts were assigned to settlers at Windsor, Parramatta, Liverpool and Bringelly.

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
Occupation1816Thomas Plows was a goldbeater in 1816 at EnglandG.
Occupation1860He was a farmer in 1860.

Family with

Jane Stanton b. c 1811, d. 1847
Children
Last Edited22 May 2001

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Parish of Registration: St Peter's C of E, Campbelltown; Year: 1827; Number: V18273992 3B.
  2. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Parish of Registration: St Peter's, Campbelltown; Year: 1850; Number: V185070 79.
  3. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Camden; Year: 1860; Number: 3455.
  4. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Parish of Registration: St John's, Parramatta; Year: 1827; Number: V18278496 1C.
  5. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Parish of Registration: Campbelltown, St Peter's C of E; Year: 1849; Number: V18499549 1C.
  6. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Parish of Registration: Campbelltown, St Peter's C of E; Year: 1832; Number: V1832545 16.
  7. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Parish of Registration: Campbelltown, St Peter's C of E; Year: 1838; Number: V18381031 22.
  8. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Parish of Registration: Church of England, Appin; Year: 1840; Number: V18401420 25A.
  9. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Parish of Registration: Church of England, Appin; Year: 1843; Number: V18431429 27A.
  10. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Parish of Registration: Church of England, Appin; Year: 1845; Number: V18451658 30A.
  11. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Parish of Registration: Church of England, Appin; Year: 1847; Number: V18471404 32A.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Jane Stanton

F, #18532, b. circa 1811, d. 1847
FatherJames Stanton
MotherFrances Haggart

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birthcirca 1811Jane Stanton was born circa 1811; based on her age of 36 entered on her death certificate.
She was the daughter of James Stanton and Frances Haggart.
Marriage13 January 1827Jane was married to Thomas Plows on Saturday, 13 January 1827 at St Peter's C of E Parish, Campbelltown, NSW, AustraliaG.1
Death1847Jane Stanton died in 1847 at St Peter's C of E Parish, Campbelltown, NSWG.2

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1827As of 13 January 1827, her married name was Plows.

Family with

Thomas Plows b. 1798, d. 23 Jun 1860
Children
Last Edited28 May 2001

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Parish of Registration: St Peter's C of E, Campbelltown; Year: 1827; Number: V18273992 3B.
  2. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Parish of Registration: Campbelltown, St Peter's C of E; Year: 1847; Number: V1847844 32B.
  3. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Parish of Registration: St John's, Parramatta; Year: 1827; Number: V18278496 1C.
  4. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Parish of Registration: Campbelltown, St Peter's C of E; Year: 1849; Number: V18499549 1C.
  5. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Parish of Registration: Campbelltown, St Peter's C of E; Year: 1832; Number: V1832545 16.
  6. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Parish of Registration: Campbelltown, St Peter's C of E; Year: 1838; Number: V18381031 22.
  7. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Parish of Registration: Church of England, Appin; Year: 1840; Number: V18401420 25A.
  8. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Parish of Registration: Church of England, Appin; Year: 1843; Number: V18431429 27A.
  9. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Parish of Registration: Church of England, Appin; Year: 1845; Number: V18451658 30A.
  10. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Parish of Registration: Church of England, Appin; Year: 1847; Number: V18471404 32A.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Donald McInnes

M, #18533, b. 1841
FatherJohn McInnes b. 1796, d. 24 Sep 1874
MotherMary McPherson d. 10 Mar 1843
RelationshipGrandson of Angus McInnes

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
BaptismDonald McInnes was baptized at St David's Presbyterian Church, Campbelltown, NSW, AustraliaG; record # 52.
Birth1841He was born in 1841 at Campbelltown, NSW, AustraliaG.
He was the son of John McInnes and Mary McPherson.
ChartsDescendant Chart - Angus McInnes
Last Edited28 Jul 2007

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Florence E Anderson

F, #18534, b. 1884, d. January 1948
Left to Right: Elizabeth Anderson, née Malpas and her daughter Florence McCredie, née Anderson
Photograph provided by Jan McInnes
FatherRobert Anderson b. 25 Jan 1839, d. 4 Sep 1934
MotherElizabeth Malpas b. 26 Aug 1863, d. 1941

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1884Florence E Anderson was born in 1884 at Church Street, Paddington, NSW, AustraliaG.1
She was the daughter of Robert Anderson and Elizabeth Malpas.
Marriage1911Florence E was married to George Roy McCredie, son of George McCredie and Susan Faulds Blackwood, in 1911 at Ballina, NSW, AustraliaG.2
DeathJanuary 1948Florence E Anderson died in January 1948 at Wahroonga, NSW, AustraliaG.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1911As of 1911, her married name was McCredie.

Family with

George Roy McCredie b. 1886, d. 1971
Child
Last Edited1 May 2008

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Glebe; Registration Year: 1884; Registration Number: 7441.
  2. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Ballina; Registration Year: 1911; Registration Number: 12161.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Charles Robert Anderson

M, #18535, b. 1891, d. 1979
FatherRobert Anderson b. 25 Jan 1839, d. 4 Sep 1934
MotherElizabeth Malpas b. 26 Aug 1863, d. 1941

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1891Charles Robert Anderson was born in 1891.
He was the son of Robert Anderson and Elizabeth Malpas.
Marriage1916Charles Robert was married to Beatrice Marie Hopkins, daughter of Abraham Hopkins and Amelia K Sutton, in 1916 at Ashfield, NSW, AustraliaG.
Death1979Charles Robert Anderson died in 1979 at Donvale, VIC, AustraliaG.1
Last Edited28 Jan 2008

Citations

  1. [S41] Index of Deaths in Victoria, Vic Deaths 1921-85, Number: 14432.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Edith Elizabeth Marler1

F, #18536, b. circa 1870

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birthcirca 1870Edith Elizabeth Marler was born circa 1870.1

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1898As of 1898, her married name was Sheather.1
Last Edited12 Sep 1999

Citations

  1. [S26] Bruce W Fairhall, 3 Jan 1999.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

John Alexander Anderson

M, #18537, b. 1886, d. circa 1968
FatherRobert Anderson b. 25 Jan 1839, d. 4 Sep 1934
MotherElizabeth Malpas b. 26 Aug 1863, d. 1941

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1886John Alexander Anderson was born in 1886 at Glebe, NSW, AustraliaG.
He was the son of Robert Anderson and Elizabeth Malpas.
MarriageJohn Alexander was married to Vera Unknown.
Deathcirca 1968John Alexander Anderson died circa 1968 at New ZealandG.
Last Edited28 Jan 2008

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Beatrice Marie Hopkins

F, #18538, b. 1885, d. 1977
FatherAbraham Hopkins
MotherAmelia K Sutton b. 1861

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1885Beatrice Marie Hopkins was born in 1885 at Waterloo, NSW, AustraliaG.
She was the daughter of Abraham Hopkins and Amelia K Sutton.
Marriage1916Beatrice Marie was married to Charles Robert Anderson, son of Robert Anderson and Elizabeth Malpas, in 1916 at Ashfield, NSW, AustraliaG.
Death1977Beatrice Marie Hopkins died in 1977 at Donvale, VIC, AustraliaG.1

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1916As of 1916, her married name was Anderson.
Last Edited28 Jan 2008

Citations

  1. [S41] Index of Deaths in Victoria, Vic Deaths 1921-85, Number: 16188.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Abraham Hopkins

M, #18540

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Marriage1885Abraham was married to Amelia K Sutton, daughter of Charles J Sutton and Mary E Greenwell, in 1885 at Newtown, NSW, AustraliaG.

Family with

Amelia K Sutton b. 1861
Children
Last Edited18 Feb 2009

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.