John Farndale

M, #16561, b. 1 October 1778
FatherGeorge Farndale b. 13 May 1753, d. 15 Jul 1781
MotherMary Stephenson b. 1753, d. 16 Mar 1782
Relationships1st cousin 5 times removed of Robert Mote
6th great-grandson of Nicholas Farndaile

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1 October 1778John Farndale was born on Thursday, 1 October 1778 at EnglandG.
He was the son of George Farndale and Mary Stephenson.
ChartsDescendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Last Edited12 Sep 1999

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Mary Farndale

F, #16562, b. 12 December 1779
FatherGeorge Farndale b. 13 May 1753, d. 15 Jul 1781
MotherMary Stephenson b. 1753, d. 16 Mar 1782
Relationships1st cousin 5 times removed of Robert Mote
6th great-granddaughter of Nicholas Farndaile

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth12 December 1779Mary Farndale was born on Sunday, 12 December 1779 at EnglandG.
She was the daughter of George Farndale and Mary Stephenson.
ChartsDescendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Last Edited12 Sep 1999

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Hannah Farndale

F, #16563, b. 17 September 1755
FatherJohn Farndale b. 25 Feb 1723/24, d. 24 Jan 1807
MotherGrace Simpson b. 1733, d. 3 May 1789
Relationships4th great-grandaunt of Robert Mote
5th great-granddaughter of Nicholas Farndaile

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth17 September 1755Hannah Farndale was born on Wednesday, 17 September 1755 at EnglandG.
She was the daughter of John Farndale and Grace Simpson.
Marriage30 May 1775Hannah was married to James Jackson on Tuesday, 30 May 1775 at EnglandG.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1775As of 30 May 1775, her married name was Jackson.
ChartsDescendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

James Jackson

M, #16564

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Marriage30 May 1775James was married to Hannah Farndale, daughter of John Farndale and Grace Simpson, on Tuesday, 30 May 1775 at EnglandG.
ChartsDescendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Elizabeth Farndale

F, #16565, b. 17 September 1755
FatherJohn Farndale b. 25 Feb 1723/24, d. 24 Jan 1807
MotherGrace Simpson b. 1733, d. 3 May 1789
Relationships4th great-grandaunt of Robert Mote
5th great-granddaughter of Nicholas Farndaile

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth17 September 1755Elizabeth Farndale was born on Wednesday, 17 September 1755 at EnglandG.
She was the daughter of John Farndale and Grace Simpson.
Marriage21 April 1782Elizabeth was married to Thomas Hall on Sunday, 21 April 1782 at EnglandG.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1782As of 21 April 1782, her married name was Hall.
ChartsDescendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Thomas Hall

M, #16566

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Marriage21 April 1782Thomas was married to Elizabeth Farndale, daughter of John Farndale and Grace Simpson, on Sunday, 21 April 1782 at EnglandG.
ChartsDescendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Sarah Farndale

F, #16567, b. 21 January 1758, d. 17 August 1759
FatherJohn Farndale b. 25 Feb 1723/24, d. 24 Jan 1807
MotherGrace Simpson b. 1733, d. 3 May 1789
Relationships4th great-grandaunt of Robert Mote
5th great-granddaughter of Nicholas Farndaile

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth21 January 1758Sarah Farndale was born on Saturday, 21 January 1758 at EnglandG.
She was the daughter of John Farndale and Grace Simpson.
Death17 August 1759Sarah Farndale died on Friday, 17 August 1759 at EnglandG at age 1.
ChartsDescendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Last Edited12 Sep 1999

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Mary Farndale

F, #16568, b. 26 April 1761
FatherJohn Farndale b. 25 Feb 1723/24, d. 24 Jan 1807
MotherGrace Simpson b. 1733, d. 3 May 1789
Relationships4th great-grandaunt of Robert Mote
5th great-granddaughter of Nicholas Farndaile

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth26 April 1761Mary Farndale was born on Sunday, 26 April 1761 at EnglandG.
She was the daughter of John Farndale and Grace Simpson.
Marriage4 February 1785Mary was married to John Frankland on Friday, 4 February 1785 at EnglandG.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1785As of 4 February 1785, her married name was Frankland.
ChartsDescendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

John Frankland

M, #16569

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Marriage4 February 1785John was married to Mary Farndale, daughter of John Farndale and Grace Simpson, on Friday, 4 February 1785 at EnglandG.
ChartsDescendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Grace Farndale

F, #16570, b. 2 December 1764
FatherJohn Farndale b. 25 Feb 1723/24, d. 24 Jan 1807
MotherGrace Simpson b. 1733, d. 3 May 1789
Relationships4th great-grandaunt of Robert Mote
5th great-granddaughter of Nicholas Farndaile

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth2 December 1764Grace Farndale was born on Sunday, 2 December 1764 at EnglandG.
She was the daughter of John Farndale and Grace Simpson.
Marriage4 May 1785Grace was married to William Fawcet on Wednesday, 4 May 1785 at EnglandG.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1785As of 4 May 1785, her married name was Fawcet.
ChartsDescendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

William Fawcet

M, #16571

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Marriage4 May 1785William was married to Grace Farndale, daughter of John Farndale and Grace Simpson, on Wednesday, 4 May 1785 at EnglandG.
ChartsDescendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

William Farndale

M, #16572, b. 30 January 1817, d. March 1891
FatherGeorge Farndale b. 1 Dec 1789, d. 8 May 1858
MotherMary Armstrong b. c 1794
Relationships1st cousin 4 times removed of Robert Mote
7th great-grandson of Nicholas Farndaile

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth30 January 1817William Farndale was born on Thursday, 30 January 1817 at EnglandG.
He was the son of George Farndale and Mary Armstrong.
DeathMarch 1891William Farndale died in March 1891 at age 74.

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
End-LineWilliam Farndale has no known descendants.
ChartsDescendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Last Edited12 Sep 1999

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Martin Farndale

M, #16573, b. 17 December 1818, d. 12 July 1862
FatherGeorge Farndale b. 1 Dec 1789, d. 8 May 1858
MotherMary Armstrong b. c 1794
Relationships1st cousin 4 times removed of Robert Mote
7th great-grandson of Nicholas Farndaile

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Baptism17 December 1818Martin Farndale was baptized on Thursday, 17 December 1818 at Great Ayton, Yorkshire, EnglandG.1
He was the son of George Farndale and Mary Armstrong.
Marriage27 February 1842Martin was married to Elizabeth Taylor on Sunday, 27 February 1842 at the Parish Church, Skelton, Yorkshire, EnglandG; While the Parish Register shows the marriage date as 27 February 1842, their marriage certificate has the date as 19 February 1842.1
Death12 July 1862Martin Farndale died on Saturday, 12 July 1862 at Guisborough, Yorkshire, EnglandG, at age 43; from empyema.2
Burial14 July 1862He was buried on 14 July 1862 at Skelton, Yorkshire, EnglandG. The white marble headstone reads:
"In loving memory of Martin Farndale of Skelton who died 11th July 1862 aged 43 years also Elizabeth wife of the above who died at Craggs Hall Farm on 21st March 1894 in her 84th year. Also William son of the above who died 29th June 1852 aged 11 years."2

Census Entries

Census DatePlaceDetails
1841Skelton, Yorkshire, EnglandGMartin Farndale appeared on the census of 1841 at Skelton, Yorkshire, EnglandG; and is listed as 25 years old and a male servant.1

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
OccupationMartin Farndale was a farmer at Yorkshire, EnglandG.

Family with

Elizabeth Taylor b. c 1811, d. 21 Mar 1894
Children
ChartsDescendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Last Edited18 Nov 2001

Citations

  1. [S192] The Farndale Directory, online http://www.farndalefamily.co.uk, Volume 2, Page 66.
  2. [S192] The Farndale Directory, online http://www.farndalefamily.co.uk, Volume 2, Page 67.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Elizabeth Taylor

F, #16574, b. circa 1811, d. 21 March 1894

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birthcirca 1811Elizabeth Taylor was born circa 1811 at Fylingdales/Whitby, Yorkshire, EnglandG; based on her age of 83 at the time of her death.1
Marriage27 February 1842Elizabeth was married to Martin Farndale, son of George Farndale and Mary Armstrong, on Sunday, 27 February 1842 at the Parish Church, Skelton, Yorkshire, EnglandG; While the Parish Register shows the marriage date as 27 February 1842, their marriage certificate has the date as 19 February 1842.2
Death21 March 1894Elizabeth Taylor died on Wednesday, 21 March 1894 at Craggs Hall Farm, Brotton, Yorkshire, EnglandG; from influenza and sirgultas.3
Burial24 March 1894She was buried on 24 March 1894 at Skelton, Yorkshire, EnglandG. The white marble headstone reads:
"In loving memory of Martin Farndale of Skelton who died 11th July 1862 aged 43 years also Elizabeth wife of the above who died at Craggs Hall Farm on 21st March 1894 in her 84th year. Also William son of the above who died 29th June 1852 aged 11 years."3

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1842As of 27 February 1842, her married name was Farndale.

Family with

Martin Farndale b. 17 Dec 1818, d. 12 Jul 1862
Children
ChartsDescendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Last Edited18 Nov 2001

Citations

  1. [S192] The Farndale Directory, online http://www.farndalefamily.co.uk, Volume 2, Page 67.
  2. [S192] The Farndale Directory, online http://www.farndalefamily.co.uk, Volume 2, Page 66.
  3. [S192] The Farndale Directory, online http://www.farndalefamily.co.uk, Volume 2, Page 68.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Martin Farndale

M, #16575, b. 19 September 1845, d. 17 January 1928
FatherMartin Farndale b. 17 Dec 1818, d. 12 Jul 1862
MotherElizabeth Taylor b. c 1811, d. 21 Mar 1894
Relationships2nd cousin 3 times removed of Robert Mote
8th great-grandson of Nicholas Farndaile

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth19 September 1845Martin Farndale was born on Friday, 19 September 1845 at Fogga Farm, near Skelton, Yorkshire, EnglandG.1
He was the son of Martin Farndale and Elizabeth Taylor.
Baptism20 October 1845Martin Farndale was baptized on Monday, 20 October 1845 at Skelton, Yorkshire, EnglandG.1
Marriage7 July 1877Martin was married to Catherine Jane Lindsay on Saturday, 7 July 1877 at St Cuthbert's Church, Darlington, Durham, EnglandG.1
Death17 January 1928Martin Farndale died on Tuesday, 17 January 1928 at Tidkinhowe Farm, Stranghow Moor, near Guisborough, Yorkshire, EnglandG, at age 82; from pneumonia.1
BurialHe was buried at the Parish Church, Boosebeck, Yorkshire, EnglandG.1

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
ArticleMartin Farndale was born on 19 September 1845 at Fogga Farm near Skelton. His father, Martin, was working on the farm which belonged to James Taylor, his father-in-law. His mother, Elizabeth (nee Taylor) seems to have been James' only child and heiress. Martin was in fact the second son of Martin and Elizabeth. At the time of the 1851 census the young Martin listed is listed as grandson to the owner of the house he was living in (ie to James Taylor of Fogga); he was aged 5 and born at Skelton. Certainly his birth is recorded in Skelton Parish Register as "Born September 19th 1845 and baptised on October 20th 1845 as son of Martin Farndale." Although all his brothers recorded at Somerset House, Martin's birth is not recorded there. The family consisted of four boys, William (b1842), Martin (b1845), John (b1848) and Matthew (b1850).

Martin's eldest brother died at Skelton, aged 11, of inflammation of the chest on 29 January 1854. Martin was aged 9 at this time. He was probably going to school at Skelton. His father died at Guisborough on 12 July 1862 of empyma and at this time Martin was 17. There is a family story that his father had been kicked by a horse.

For the next 14 years it appears that Martin grew up in the Skelton/Brotton area. He probably went on working for his maternal grandfather for some time, taking on the responsibility of looking after his two younger brothers and his mother.

By 1877 however, Martin was described as a miner of Brotton on his marriage certificate. He married Catherine Jane Lindsay, daughter of Andrew Lindsay, a shoemaker of Darlington, at St Cuthbert's Church, Darlington on 7 July 1877. He was aged 31 and she was aged 28. The ceremony was witnesses by James Mattison and Polly Thompson and the service was conducted by the Reverend T E Hodgson vicar.

It appears that the newly wedded couple moved to a cottage at Kilton-Thorpe. According to Brotton Parish Register, their eldest son John was baptised on 17 February 1878 having been born 24 December 1877. He was born "to Martin and Catherine Jane Farndale of Kilton Thorpe, a miner." Their next child, a daughter, Elizabeth Lindsay was born two years later on 11 December 1879 and baptised at Brotton on 25 January 1850. Martin and Catherine were still living at Kilton Thorpe, but he was now described as a farmer. Their third child, Martin, was born on 8 June 1881 and was baptised at Brotton on 31 July 1881 and his parents were still at Kilton-Thorpe and described as farmers.

Sometime in the next two years Martin moved to Tranmire Farm near Whitby since his next two children were born there. There is a family story that Martin asked his brother Matthew to go to make a bid for Craggs Hall Farm near Brotton. The story goes that Matthew returned saying that he'd taken the farm - for himself! True or not that is where Matthew went and Martin went to Tranmire, a farm some ten miles along the road to Whitby - a poor moore farm near Ugthorpe situated on Roxby Moor. The other brother John spent his life working on the railway at Loftus. It was at Tranmire that their next son George was born in January 1883 and also their next daughter, Catherine Jane, named after her mother and always known as Kate; she was born on 16 June 1884.

But by the time James was born on 22 December 1885, the family had moved to Tidkinhowe farm on Stranghow Moor near Guisborough, an improvement on Tranmire. Eldest son John recalled driving sheep from Tranmire to Tidkinhowe when seven years old; this would mean 1884.

The young family were brought up at Tidkinhowe and the other six children were born there. William was born on 22 June 1887, but died only two years later on 19 July 1889. By this time Mary Frances had been born on 22 January 1889 and another son also to be called William, in January 1891. Two and a half years later came Grace Alice, named after her mother's sister and her mother's mother, Alice Lindsay. Then two years later Dorothy Annie was born on 24 May 1895 to be followed by the last and youngest child, Alfred on 5 July 1897.

By now Martin was 52 and his wife, Catherine still only 43. They continued to work the farm at Tidkinhowe and the eldest sons and daughters were now starting to work helping to look after the youngest who were going to school at Boosebeck. On 23 August 1903 Lynn (Elizabeth Lindsay) married George Barker and went to Tancred Grange near Scorton to live. John worked on the farm and in 18? Martin went to try his fortune in Western Canada, soon to be followed by his brother George in ?. The Canada bug hit the family hard and Kate went in ? to join her brothers; she never returned to England. In ? James followed though he was to spend his late life in the United States. Mary remained at home until she was married to George Brown in ? and went to live at ?. Meanwhile William had become a butcher at ?, but soon the Canada bug hit again and he went off to join his brothers in Canada, settling in Regina (?) in ?.

On 14 July 1911, Catherine Jane Farndale died at Tidkinhowe aged 56; she was buried at Boosebeck Parish Church. Martin was now alone at the farm, but surrounded by his family, though now five were in Canada, two (Lynne and Mary) were married and one, the first William, had died. John the eldest was on the farm and Grace, by now 18 and Dorothy 16 were there to help bring up the youngest, Alfred, aged 14.

When the war came in 1914 three of the boys became soldiers. James joined the American forces and fought in France. Soon he was joined by William, serving in the Canadian Army who was wounded near Ypres in 1917 and then by Alfred who served from 1916 to 1920 as a British soldier in the Machine-Gun Corps in France and Mesopotamia.

After the war James returned to America where in September 1917, he had married Edna Adams. William returned to Canada where he too intended to marry, but tragically he died on 20 November 1919 from the flu, contracted when he was still weak from his was wound. Alfred returned to Tidkinhowe in March 1920. But George Barker, Lynn's husband at Tancred Grange had died in ? and their young family wee unable to cope alone. Alfred went to help out and stayed until 1921 before he returned home to help at the farm. He remained at home until Martin died on 17 January 1928, aged 82, of pneumonia. Martin is buried beside Catherine Jane at Boosebeck Parish Church where there is an inscription which says "Catherine Jane Farndale, Died 14 July 1911 aged 56 years, also MARTIN, Beloved Husband of the above, Died 17 January 1928 aged 82 years of Tidkinhowe Farm."1
OccupationMartin Farndale was a farmer at Yorkshire, EnglandG.

Family with

Catherine Jane Lindsay b. c 1855, d. 14 Jul 1911
Children
ChartsDescendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Last Edited3 Oct 2004

Citations

  1. [S192] The Farndale Directory, online http://www.farndalefamily.co.uk, History of Martin Farndale.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Catherine Jane Lindsay

F, #16576, b. circa 1855, d. 14 July 1911

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birthcirca 1855Catherine Jane Lindsay was born circa 1855 at EnglandG; based on her age at the time of her death.
Marriage7 July 1877Catherine Jane was married to Martin Farndale, son of Martin Farndale and Elizabeth Taylor, on Saturday, 7 July 1877 at St Cuthbert's Church, Darlington, Durham, EnglandG.1
Death14 July 1911Catherine Jane Lindsay died on Friday, 14 July 1911 at Tidkinhowe Farm, Stranghow Moor, near Guisborough, Yorkshire, EnglandG.1
BurialShe was buried at the Parish Church, Boosebeck, Yorkshire, EnglandG.1

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1877As of 7 July 1877, her married name was Farndale.

Family with

Martin Farndale b. 19 Sep 1845, d. 17 Jan 1928
Children
ChartsDescendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Last Edited18 Nov 2001

Citations

  1. [S192] The Farndale Directory, online http://www.farndalefamily.co.uk, History of Martin Farndale.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Alfred Farndale

M, #16577, b. 5 July 1897, d. 30 May 1987
FatherMartin Farndale b. 19 Sep 1845, d. 17 Jan 1928
MotherCatherine Jane Lindsay b. c 1855, d. 14 Jul 1911
Relationships3rd cousin 2 times removed of Robert Mote
9th great-grandson of Nicholas Farndaile

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth5 July 1897Alfred Farndale was born on Monday, 5 July 1897 at Tidkinhowe Farm, Stranghow Moor, near Guisborough, Yorkshire, EnglandG.1
He was the son of Martin Farndale and Catherine Jane Lindsay.
Marriage16 March 1928Alfred was married to Margaret Louise Baker on Friday, 16 March 1928 at Bedale Parish Church, England.2
Death30 May 1987Alfred Farndale died on Saturday, 30 May 1987 at Rutson Hospital, Northallerton, Yorkshire, EnglandG, at age 89.2
Cremationafter 30 May 1987He was cremated after 30 May 1987 at Darlington, Durham, EnglandG.2
Burialafter 31 May 1987He was buried after 31 May 1987 at Wensley Churchyard, Yorkshire, England.2

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
Occupationbefore 1935Alfred Farndale was a farmer before 1935 at Alberta, CanadaG.2
Occupationbetween 1935 and 1942He was a farmer between 1935 and 1942 at Thornton-le-Moor, Yorkshire, EnglandG.2
Occupationbetween 1943 and 1972He was a farmer between 1943 and 1972 at Gale Bank Farm, Wensley, Yorkshire, EnglandG.2
Article29 July 1982Talk between Alfred Farndale and his son, Martin on 29 July 1982

"I remember going to school at Charltons near Tidkinhowe. We then went to Standard 1 at Bosbeck. We stayed there until we were 14. It was a two mile walk each day. The headmaster was Mr Ranson. I remember Jim, my elder brother catching me fishing and playing truant. He just said "Get in" (he was in a pony and trap) and he took me to a days marketing at Stokesley. I remember the second masters name was Ackroyd. I got a fork through my leg and he sucked it out. We were always inspected as we arrived at school. We had to walk passed the Bainbridge place and people used to say that he had more sheep on the moor than he was allowed. I remember William looking after me at mother's funeral. I was crying and very upset.

The war came in 1914 and I was just 17. I wanted to join up so I ran away and joined up at the local recruiting office at Northallerton, somewhere in South Parade I think. I joined the West Yorks but my father found out and said I was under age, which I was. The CO wanted me to stay on the band, but father wouldn't hear of it and I came out. I remember being very proud of my first leave in uniform. Then one day they called for volunteers for the Machine-Gun Corps and I stepped forward. We went to Belton Park, near Grantham for training. I joined 239th Company MGC and we were attached to the Middlesex Regiment. In 1917 we sailed for Calais and went to "Dickiebush" Camp. We were first in action at Westbrook and Polygon Wood. I remember an incident on the Menin Road galloping up with two limbers of ammunition towards the gun positions at Hooge. I was a Private but I was giving a lift to Quarter Master Sergeant Zaccarelli. The Germans started to shell us. They could clearly see us. I had one horse killed and I managed to cut him free and I then rode the other. Zaccarelli was killed; it was quite a party when I reported it. My Captain asked if there were any witnesses but there were none, otherwise I might have got something. I remember an officer coming up to me when we were under bombardment at Ypres and saying "How would you like to be in Saltburn now, Farndale?" We saw some action at Zonnebeke, Ploegstraat and Arras. The suddenly we were ordered to Marseilles and got on a troopship for Basra in Mesoptamia. After about 14 days we were in the Suez Canal and then the Red Sea. We landed at Basra and marched to Kut-el-Amara as part of a force under General Maud to relieve Townsend. About the middle of 1918 the Turks surrendered. We hung around for quite a while. I cut my thumb on a bully beef tin and it got poisoned. I was in hospital in Kut when 239th Company left for England. I eventually got to Mosul where I thought my unit was and met my platoon commander Lieutenant Pearson. He asked me where I had been and put me in charge of the officers mess. We had some Punjabi officers at the time and they used to knock me up to try to get whiskey! Later in 1918 we were ordered to Bombay. I remember I had to take my stripes down on the troopship. We were sent up to the Afghan frontier for a while and we had quite a lot of trouble in the local bazaars.

Eventually in early 1919 I think, we got a troopship to England. We landed at Southampton. I remember we were told that we could keep our greatcoats or take £1 when we were demobbed on Salisbury Plain. I took the £1! I remember arriving at Middlesborough station very late at night and sleeping on the platform. I got the first train next day to Guisborough and actually arrived at Tidkinhowe before they were up! This would be in 1919. I know that I was clear of the army by the start of 1920. I wish I had stayed in. I really did like the army life. But I had to come out.

I then went to Tancred Grange to help my eldest sister Lynn whose husband had died in 1918. I spent my time between Tancred and Tidkinhowe till I married your mother on 16 March 1928 at Bedale Parish Church. Martin was over from Canada and he was best man. It was just after my father died in January 1928. My eldest brother, John took over Tidkinhowe. Peggy and I had already decided to join the 'Canadians' [his brothers Jim, Martin and George and his sister Kate] in Alberta. We went to Huxley and rented a section of the CPR and you three children were born. However we had bad luck with crops and the slump and we had to go back to England in 1935.

We had a farm in Middleton-One-Row in 1936 and then we moved to Sycamore Lodge at Thornton-le-Moor near Northallerton in 1937. That was where Margot was born. It was too small though and we left it in 1940 after the war had started. We then lived at 117 Crosby Road, Northallerton. I was a farm contractor doing ploughing and threshing. It was very hard work and very long hours. I was Special Constable as well. Then, in January 1943, we moved to Gale Bank Farm at Wensley. We had been looking for farms for years and this was easily the best, so our luck had changed. It was then about 400 acres, but now it is more. Peggy and I retired in 1972 and we are now living at "Highfields", Eller Close Road, Leyburn."2

Family with

Margaret Louise Baker
Child
ChartsDescendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Last Edited3 Oct 2004

Citations

  1. [S192] The Farndale Directory, online http://www.farndalefamily.co.uk, History of Martin Farndale.
  2. [S192] The Farndale Directory, online http://www.farndalefamily.co.uk, History of Alfred Farndale.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Margaret Louise Baker

F, #16578

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Marriage16 March 1928Margaret Louise was married to Alfred Farndale, son of Martin Farndale and Catherine Jane Lindsay, on Friday, 16 March 1928 at Bedale Parish Church, England.1

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1928As of 16 March 1928, her married name was Farndale.

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
Article1928Margaret was from Audlem, Cheshire, England.1

Family with

Alfred Farndale b. 5 Jul 1897, d. 30 May 1987
Child
ChartsDescendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Last Edited1 Dec 2008

Citations

  1. [S192] The Farndale Directory, online http://www.farndalefamily.co.uk, History of Alfred Farndale.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

General, Sir Martin Baker Farndale KCB

M, #16579, b. 6 January 1929, d. 10 May 2000
General Sir Martin Farndale KCB
FatherAlfred Farndale b. 5 Jul 1897, d. 30 May 1987
MotherMargaret Louise Baker
Relationships4th cousin 1 time removed of Robert Mote
10th great-grandson of Nicholas Farndaile

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth6 January 1929General, Sir Martin Baker Farndale KCB was born on Sunday, 6 January 1929 at Trochu, Alberta, CanadaG.1
He was the son of Alfred Farndale and Margaret Louise Baker.
Death10 May 2000General, Sir Martin Baker Farndale KCB died on Wednesday, 10 May 2000 at EnglandG at age 71.1

Military Service

EventDateDetails
Mil-ActionEducated at Yorebridge Grammar School and the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, Sir Martin Farndale was commissioned into the Royal Artillery in 1948. He went to the Staff College, Camberley in 1959.

In 1969 he was appointed Commanding Officer of 1st Regiment Royal Horse Artillery which was deployed to Northern Ireland at the early stages of The Troubles.

In 1973 he was appointed Commander of 7th Armoured Brigade in Germany before, in 1978, he returned to the UK to become Director of Operations at the Ministry of Defence in which role he had to organise the disarming of guerillas in order to facilitate the creation of the future nation of Zimbabwe.

He was appointed General Officer Commanding 2nd Armoured Division in Germany in 1980.

In 1983, he became GOC of 1st British Corps.

Finally, in 1985, he was made GOC of British Army of the Rhine and Northern Army Group.

In retirement he wrote four volumes of the History of the Royal Artillery.

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
The Telegraph13 May 2000General, Sir Martin Baker Farndale KCB had an obituary appear in The Telegraph on Saturday, 13 May 2000 as follows:

      General Sir Martin Farndale
     Commander who oversaw the two biggest British military exercises held since D-Day

     GENERAL SIR MARTIN FARNDALE, former Commander-in-Chief, the British Army of the Rhine, and Commander, Northern Army Group, who has died aged 71, had a dynamic, inspiring personality which made him successful and popular in a wide variety of projects and several theatres of action.
     Urbane, slightly unmilitary in appearance, and softly spoken with a faint lisp, Farndale was relaxed, self-confident and wholly unpretentious. His fellow Nato generals acknowledged him to be one of the most gifted field commanders in the alliance, and knew that his skill as a tactician was informed by a compendious knowledge of military history.
     "If you want to go the full 15 rounds with Martin," an American general once commented, "you'd better be prepared to learn that your pet new tactic, which you had toyed with the idea of naming after yourself, was first devised and used in battle by the Romans."
     In 1984, as Commander of 1st (British) Corps, BAOR, Farndale oversaw Exercise Lionheart, manoeuvres involving 131,000 British troops, including tens of thousands of Territorials and Army Reservists, and extending over 3,700 square miles. Lionheart, intended to test BAOR's reinforcement plans, was the biggest British military exercise to be held since the Second World War.
     As Commander-in-Chief, BAOR, from 1985 to 1987, Farndale worked doggedly to implement a revised "concept of operations" for the Northern Army Group. Under this, the five nations involved agreed to fight under Farndale's direct battlefield command, according to an agreed defensive doctrine and standardised procedures. In the event of a Russian invasion, the new plans, he explained in 1987, would enable Nato forces to "bide our time and then strike viciously, at the time of our choosing, at an exposed flank or sector".
     These new operational plans were tested in 1987 during Exercise Certain Strike, the largest and most complex field exercise of its type staged in Europe since the D-Day landings in 1944.
     Later, in his capacity as chairman of Royal Artillery Museums, Farndale's drive to establish the RA Museum at Woolwich (which is due to be opened in May 2001) earned him the nickname "Project Champion"; all noted the tremendous energy he showed in fundraising, leadership and organisation. After leaving the Army he had a successful career in industry and as a writer.
     Martin Baker Farndale, of Yorkshire farming ancestry, was born in Alberta, Canada, on January 6 1929 and went to Yorebridge Grammar School, Yorkshire.
     Having joined the Army in 1946, he attended Sandhurst and was commissioned into the Royal Artillery in 1948. After early service in an anti-aircraft unit on the Suez Canal, he was selected for the 1st Royal Horse Artillery, with whom he served in Germany from 1952 to 1954. He was then posted for three years to HQ 7th Armoured Division, and after that attended the Staff College, Camberley. This was followed by another staff post - with HQ, 17 Gurkha Division, in Malaya.
     From 1962 to 1964 Farndale commanded a Chestnut Troop in 1st RHA in Germany and in Aden, where he saw action. He was an instructor at the Staff College from 1966 to 1969, and then was for two years in Northern Ireland, commanding 1st RHA, the first gunner regiment to serve as infantry in Belfast.
     After a spell on the defence policy staff at the Ministry of Defence, he commanded 7th Armoured Brigade in Germany; and then from 1976 to 1978 he was Director of Public Relations for the Army.
     In the latter post he was a great success, being a fluent and amusing speaker as well as being able to cope at short notice with questions about embarrassing incidents which occasionally occur even in the best conducted units.
     He was Director of Military Operations at the Ministry of Defence from 1978 to 1980, during which time he was involved in the arrangements for Rhodesia's independence as Zimbabwe. He went on to command 2nd Armoured Division in BAOR from 1980 to 1983; and thereafter spent the rest of his Army career in Germany, first as Commander of 1st (British) Corps from 1983 to 1985 and then as Commander-in-Chief, BAOR.
     After retirement, Farndale became a director and senior defence adviser of Short Bros, and defence adviser to Deloitte Touche.
     For eight years he also held the appointment of Master Gunner, St James's Park, an office dating back to the 17th century. The Master Gunner's principal duty is to keep the Queen, who is Captain General of the Royal Regiment of Artillery, informed of all matters pertaining to the Royal Artillery.
     Farndale was Colonel Commandant of the Army Air Corps (1980-88), of the Royal Artillery from 1982 and of the RHA from 1988. He was chairman of the Royal United Services Institute (1989-93), and a consultant to Westland Helicopters (1989-95).
     From 1993 he was chairman of the Battlefield Trust, which, under the auspices of English Heritage, endeavours to preserve historic battlefields from being destroyed by roadworks or building projects.
     Farndale succeeded in saving the site of the Battle of Tewkesbury (1471) from developers. Martin Farndale was also a prolific writer. He wrote a four volume account of the history of the Royal Artillery, covering the years 1914-1998, as well as writing many articles for the British Army Review and the Royal Artillery Journal. He was also interested in genealogy and had traced his family back to 1615.
     He was appointed CB in 1980 and KCB in 1983.
     He married, in 1955, Anne Buckingham; they had a son.
The Times, London, EnglandG15 May 2000He had an obituary appear in The Times, London, EnglandG, on Monday, 15 May 2000 as follows:

GENERAL SIR MARTIN FARNDALE
General Sir Martin Farndale, KCB, C-in-C BAOR and Commander Northern Army Group, 1985-87, was born on January 6, 1929. He died on May 10 aged 71


MARTIN FARNDALE might well have become the Chief of General Staff - the professional head of the Army - if timings had fitted better and if the Falklands campaign of 1982 had not swung defence thinking away from its over-emphasis upon European defence towards the greater likelihood of threats arising outside the Nato area. The latter half of Farndale's career had been centred almost exclusively upon the British Army of the Rhine. He commanded in succession its 7th Armoured Brigade, 2nd Armoured Division, 1st British Corps and finally, in 1985, BAOR and Northern Army Group, giving him a European Central Front bias at a time when rapid reaction forces for worldwide deployment were coming into vogue.
     Martin Baker Farndale was born in Alberta, Canada, of Yorkshire parentage and brought up and educated back in Yorkshire at Yorebridge School. He was just too young to see service in the Second World War, but joined the Indian Army in 1946.
     After Indian Independence in 1947, he transferred to the British Army and was sent to Sandhurst, which had just reopened as the Royal Military Academy. He was commissioned into the Royal Regiment of Artillery in 1948.
     Farndale was rather a private person with the single-mindedness of purpose and professional integrity needed for a successful military career. He was always "on duty" in both an intellectual and military sense, and although he was punctilious about military niceties he was, paradoxically, relaxed and approachable with a typical Yorkshire forthrightness. These qualities made him immensely respected and liked throughout the Army.
     His hallmarks were enthusiasm for the matter in hand and avoidance of self-advertisement. He was, indeed, a generous, humane and caring man with more than a touch of humility.
     He started his military career in the 80th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment in the Suez Canal Zone, but his command abilities were soon recognised with his selection for the elite Royal Horse Artillery. He joined 1st Regiment RHA in 1950 with which he was to serve on and off for the next twenty-one years.
     During his first tour he was in E and then B Batteries in BAOR. His abilities as a potential staff officer were equally quickly recognised when he was posted to the Royal Artillery Staff of 7th Armoured Division at Verden, Lower Saxony, in 1954. He went to the Staff College, Camberley, in 1959 after a spell with 53rd (Louisberg) Battery and as Adjutant of the 22nd Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment. At Camberley he showed himself to be exceptionally articulate, both verbally and on paper, with a sensible balanced approach and a nice sense of humour. He was perhaps disappointed not to get a General Staff appointment after graduating. Instead he was sent to the Gunner staff with 17th Gurkha Division in the Far East, where he saw active service during the final phases of the Malayan campaign.
     His first General Staff appointment came in 1963 when he served for two years in the Military Operations Directorate of the War Office and then the Ministry of Defence during the withdrawal from Empire of the mid-1960s, in which he was soon to be involved personally. He returned to 1st RHA in 1964 in command of the Chestnut Troop, which he took out to Aden for the Radfan campaign, fought in the arid mountains of the Protectorate.
     His outstanding abilities were recognised when he went back to the Staff College for three years as an instructor in 1966, and was then given command of 1st RHA in 1969. He had the unique distinction of being the first artillery commanding officer to take his regiment to Northern Ireland to serve as infantry on the streets of Belfast in the earliest years of the Troubles.
     Two years followed on the Defence Policy Staff in the Ministry of Defence while the Heath Government was trying unsuccessfully to reverse the British military cutbacks set in train by Denis Healey's defence reviews. In 1973 he was promoted to brigadier and started his rise to high command.
     His first major command was in Germany with 7th Armoured Brigade at Soltau in Lower Saxony. His easy fluency with the press and media led to him becoming a highly successful Director of the Army's Public Relations before he was promoted major-general as the Director of Military Operations from 1978 to 1980 during the final phases of the guerrilla campaign in Rhodesia in the aftermath of Ian Smith's unilateral declaration of independence. He was largely responsible for setting up the British Monitoring Force, which helped to end the guerrilla war and to bring about an independent Zimbabwe.
     He was back in BAOR commanding, in succession, and without any further breaks away on the Staff: 2nd Armoured Division, 1981-83; 1st British Corps, 1983-85; and finally Northern Army Group and BAOR, 1985-87.
     He became very much a Nato man, and was widely respected in international military circles for his deep understanding of continental warfare as it might have been fought in the 1980s. He was appointed CB in 1980 and KCB in 1983.
     Farndale retired from the Army in January 1988 and took up a number of appointments connected with the armaments industry. Since 1988 he had been a defence adviser to Deloitte Touche, and he was also a consultant to Somerset-based Westland Helicopters, 1989-95. He was also a very active chairman of the Royal United Services Institution.
     His principal hobby was writing definitive histories of the Royal Artillery to which he was devoted: His History of the Royal Artillery, France, 1914-18 was published in 1987 and his History of the Royal Artillery; The Forgotten Fronts and the Home Base, 1914-18, in 1988.
     He was also the author of volume V of The History of the Royal Artillery in the Second World War (The Years of Defeat, 1939-41) which appeared in 1996, and of volume VI (The Far East Theatre, 1941-46), which will be published posthumously.
     He was thus a happy choice as Master Gunner of St James's Park, the honorary appointment that he assumed in November 1988 as well as being Colonel Commandant of the RHA, Honorary Colonel of 1st Regiment RHA and of the 3rd Battalion, the Yorkshire Volunteers - his home county - and Colonel Commandant of the Army Air Corps.
     From 1989 Farndale championed the Royal Artillery Museum Project to create a new museum in the Royal Arsenal at Woolwich to house the vast regimental collection of guns, medals, books and archives. He became president and later chairman of the project, and it was through his inspiration, leadership and his abundant reserves of forceful energy that money was raised from a variety of sources: the regiment itself, industry, individual benefactors, trusts and national funds. He lived to see the start of the building programme which is scheduled to culminate in the opening of the new museum in May next year.
     In 1955 he married Margaret Anne Buckingham. They had one son, who followed his father into the Royal Artillery. Both wife and son survive him.

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
OccupationGeneral, Sir Martin Baker Farndale KCB was a soldier at EnglandG.
AwardsHe was made a Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath.
ChartsDescendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Last Edited16 Apr 2012

Citations

  1. [S192] The Farndale Directory, online http://www.farndalefamily.co.uk

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.