Dennis Boyle

M, #11845
Last Edited20 Nov 1999

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Kathy Unknown

F, #11846

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married NameHer married name was Hall.
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

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Ann Smith

F, #11852

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married NameHer married name was Hall.
Last Edited28 Sep 2008

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Francis Browning

M, #11853, b. 27 July 1794
FatherWilliam Browning b. 1758
MotherSarah Mary Pile(s) b. 12 Oct 1766, d. 1859

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Baptism27 July 1794Francis Browning was baptized on Sunday, 27 July 1794 at Sydney Cove, NSW, Australia.1
He was the son of William Browning and Sarah Mary Pile(s).
Last Edited20 Nov 1999

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Birth Registration: Sydney; Year of Registration: 1794; Registration Number: V1794379 1A.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Sophia Browning

F, #11854
FatherWilliam Browning b. 1758
MotherSarah Mary Pile(s) b. 12 Oct 1766, d. 1859

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
BirthSophia Browning was born.
She was the daughter of William Browning and Sarah Mary Pile(s).
Marriage12 December 1810Sophia was married to John Davis on Wednesday, 12 December 1810 at St Phillip's Church, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1810As of 12 December 1810, her married name was Davis.
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Mary Browning

F, #11855
FatherWilliam Browning b. 1758
MotherSarah Mary Pile(s) b. 12 Oct 1766, d. 1859

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
BirthMary Browning was born.
She was the daughter of William Browning and Sarah Mary Pile(s).
Marriage31 August 1812Mary was married to Edward Goodwin on Monday, 31 August 1812 at St Matthew's Church, Windsor, NSW, Australia.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1812As of 31 August 1812, her married name was Goodwin.
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

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John Davis

M, #11856

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Marriage12 December 1810John was married to Sophia Browning, daughter of William Browning and Sarah Mary Pile(s), on Wednesday, 12 December 1810 at St Phillip's Church, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

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Edward Goodwin

M, #11857

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Marriage31 August 1812Edward was married to Mary Browning, daughter of William Browning and Sarah Mary Pile(s), on Monday, 31 August 1812 at St Matthew's Church, Windsor, NSW, Australia.
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Sarah Smith

F, #11858, b. 3 December 1772, d. 31 May 1857

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth3 December 1772Sarah Smith was born on Thursday, 3 December 1772 at Holborn, London, England.1
Marriage24 December 1842Sarah was married to John Frederick Cobcroft, son of John Cobcroft and Dorothy Unknown, on Saturday, 24 December 1842 at School House, Wilberforce, NSW, Australia.1
Death31 May 1857Sarah Smith died on Sunday, 31 May 1857 at Wilberforce, NSW, Australia, at age 84.
Burial2 June 1857She was buried on 2 June 1857 at Family Vault, St John's Cemetery, Wilberforce, NSW, Australia.2

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1842As of 24 December 1842, her married name was Cobcroft.

Voyages

DateDetails
January 1790Sarah Smith was a convict aboard The Ship Neptune which sailed from England in January 1790 and arrived in Port Jackson on 26 June 1790.

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
Occupation1790Sarah Smith was a midwife in 1790.
Article1790Sarah Smith, aged 17, was one of a small group of women and their children who embarked on the Neptune transport in late 1789. They had accepted a government offer of a free passage to the colony for the wives or de facto partners of convicts on the fleet. In the colony she lived with John Cobcroft (b.c1760, tried Old Bailey), but for an unknown reason they did not marry until 1842. It seems almost certain that she embarked as Cobcroft's de facto wife. Two of the other free women who embarked on the Neptune were legally married to John Wood and William Fielder, who had been convicted with Cobcroft. Sarah Smith was baptised at Holborn, London on 3 December 1772, the daughter of William and Esther Turner.
The couple's children born in the colony were: Richard William (1793), Elizabeth (b. & d. 1795), John Frederick (1797), Sarah (1799), Mary Ann (c1801), Susannah (1805), James (c1807), George (1810), Eliza (1812) and Matilda (1813). Until his death at 23 in 1830 she cared for her son James, who suffered from a condition described as parralitic insanity (epilepsy) from childhood. From 1795 the couple were settled on a 30 acre grant on the left bank of Wilberforce Reach on the Hawkesbury River. They prospered steadily, building their landholdings by grant and purchase to a total of 485 acres by 1828.
Throughout her working life Sarah acted as a midwife to the women of Wilberforce district and delivered the children of convict women free of charge. A portrait of her in old age depicts a determined and indomitable matriarch. She was reunited with her sister Susannah after a separation of 50 years when the latter arrived in the colony in 1839 (dying 1844), John Cobcroft died in 1853. Sarah died on 31 May 1857, aged 85, and was buried with her husband in the family vault in Wilberforce Cemetery. Their descendants are estimated to number well in excess of 8,000.
Notes: See D. Bowd, Hawkesbury Journey p98; Sarah Smith was unable to write her name; some publications have incorrectly identified her as a female convict of this name who arrived on the Neptune; Sarah stated in her 1825 memorial (AONSW 4/1840C, p777) that she had come free to the colony together with six other females sent out by Government for the purpose of practising midwifery per ship Neptune; although she undoubtedly became a skilled midwife in the colony there is no evidence that the Government sent free women to the colony for this specific purpose; her statement is more likely a slight distortion of the circumstances of her arrival in an attempt to give her position and services a more official appearance; some details contibuted by W.J. Luxford, P. McIntyre & A. Needham.3

Family with

John Frederick Cobcroft b. 9 Aug 1756, d. 4 Jun 1853
Children
Last Edited3 Oct 2004

Citations

  1. [S76] Cobcroft Descendants, Record # 2.
  2. [S97] Michael Flynn, The 1790 Second Fleet, pp 207-208.
  3. [S97] Michael Flynn, The 1790 Second Fleet, pp 541-2.

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John Frederick Cobcroft

M, #11859, b. 9 August 1756, d. 4 June 1853
FatherJohn Cobcroft b. 2 Jul 1710
MotherDorothy Unknown

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth9 August 1756John Frederick Cobcroft was born on Monday, 9 August 1756 at Keighley, Yorkshire, England.
He was the son of John Cobcroft and Dorothy Unknown.
Marriage24 December 1842John Frederick was married to Sarah Smith on Saturday, 24 December 1842 at School House, Wilberforce, NSW, Australia.1
Death4 June 1853John Frederick Cobcroft died on Saturday, 4 June 1853 at Wilberforce, NSW, Australia, at age 96.1
Burial7 June 1853He was buried on 7 June 1853 at Family Vault, St John's Cemetery, Wilberforce, NSW, Australia.2

Criminal Record

DatePlaceDetails
7 May 1788the Old Bailey, London, EnglandJohn Frederick Cobcroft was sentenced to death on Wednesday, 7 May 1788 at the Old Bailey, London, England.
John Cobcroft, John Wood and William Fubbs or Fielder were sentenced to death at the 7 May 1788 Old Bailey sessions for highway robbery. At 4am on 16 April William Frost, an elderly fisherman, had been driving a cart from Harrow Hill to market in London with his wife and daughter. On Edgware Road they were stopped by three highwaymen, one of whom brandished a pistol, shouting: "Your money or your life in a minute" and threatening to blow their brains out. The men took a guinea, six shillings, a thimble and some small change and ran off towards Edgware. Frost then drove to the Bell public House near Kilburn and raised the alarm. The publican and three other men went out in search of the highwaymen and spotted three men coming from Golders Green along Hendon Road near the Bull and Bush public house on Hampstead Heath. After a struggle the three were arrested and found to be carrying a pistol, a knife and some money. They were taken to the Bow Street Public Office and charged. Frost said he had seen their faces clearly: it had been a "moonshiney" night.

At the trial the three men retained a defense counsel who closely cross examined Frost, his wife and daughter, trying to discredit their evidence and suggesting that they were pursuing the case only to obtain the forty pounds rewards for the conviction of highwaymen. Cobcroft had been wearing a leather apron and they said he had been the one pointing the pistol. He called six character witnesses who had known him between five and twelve years, which suggests that he was well established in London. The jury recommended him and his co-defendants to the King's clemency. A temporary respite was granted but he was not formerly reprieved until the end of the September 1789 Old Bailey Sessions when he was among more than one hundred capital convicts called to the bar of the court and offered a pardon on condition of transportation to New South Wales for life.
On 10 November he was sent from Newgate Gaol to the Scarborough transport. Soon afterwards Sarah Smith (QV), aged 18, embarked on the Neptune transport, as one of about six wives or de facto spouses of convicts who had accepted the government offer of a free passage to the colony. Although she was to live with Cobcroft for the rest of his life, the couple did not marry until 1842. The legal wives of Wood and Fielder also sailed on the Neptune.

In colonial records their surname was often spelt Cobcraft. A son born to the couple on 3 February 1793 was baptised Richard William at Parramatta on 17 March. Cobcroft received a conditional pardon in December 1794 and a 30 acre land grant on the left bank of the Hawkesbury River at Wilberforce Reach in July 1795. He was granted another 40 acres in the same district in June 1797. By July 1800 Cobcroft had 17 acres sown in wheat with seven ready for planting maize, owned nine hogs and seven goats and supported himself. His wife and three children were supported from government stores. Two years later he had 20 acres in wheat and barley, 6 in maize and increasing numbers of hogs and goats. Holding 10 bushels of wheat and 20 of maize he fully supported his wife and four children and two free workers. His holdings were increased by a 50 acre land grant in September 1802. Cobcroft was mustered in 1806 with 120 acres (nearly 33 cultivated in wheat, maize, barley, orchard and garden), four horses, 57 sheep, 40 goats and 15 hogs, 15 bushels of grain in store, and supporting his family and three convict workers. While many other farmers were suffering from indebtedness and flood damage, his prosperity seems to have continued unchecked.
In June 1820 Cobcroft petitioned Governor Macquarie for additional land. He described his land grants of the 1790s as one of 30 acres at Wilberforce an another a back farm, also of 30 acres (sic). In 1820 he had a wife and nine children and owned 70 head of cattle. He was granted a further 60 acres at Kurrajong and in October 1825 he petitioned for the allowance of government rations for himself, his wife, four children and two convict workers who were living on the grant. He stated that he had cleared and cultivated 12 acres and had built a dwelling house and outhouses. His request was granted shortly afterwards.

Sarah, a midwife, bore a total of ten children. In 1828 Cobcroft was described as a farmer of Wilberforce, aged 68, living with his wife, aged 57, and their younger children; his older sons and their families were established on farms nearby. A successful and prosperous farmer, he held 485 acres in 1828 (130 cultivated) and owned 7 horses and 300 cattle. He kept the George and dragon public house, Wilberforce Road, Wilberforce, from around 1822-1846 and was actively involved in the public life of the local community. He died on 4 June 1853 and was buried in a family vault at St Johns Cemetery, Wilberforce on the 7th. An obituary notice in the Sydney Morning Herald stated that he left 58 grandchildren and 47 great-grandchildren. His wife was buried with him on 2 June 1857 and their headstone survives in Wilberforce Cemetery. Their descendents are estimated to number well in excess of 8,000.
Notes: Some details contributed by W. Luxford, P. McIntyre & A. Needham; see AONSW CSIL 1829; 7/318.1; Bowd Hawkesbury Journey p99.2

Voyages

DateDetails
January 1790John Frederick Cobcroft was a convict aboard The Ship Scarborough which sailed from Portsmouth, Hampshire, England, in January 1790 and arrived in Port Jackson on 28 June 1790.

Census Entries

Census DatePlaceDetails
1828New South Wales, AustraliaJohn Frederick Cobcroft appeared on the census of 1828 at New South Wales, Australia, which shows them with 485 acres of which 130 were cultivated. They also had 130 cattle.3

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
Occupationbetween 1822 and 1846John Frederick Cobcroft was also a publican dispensing good cheer at the George and Dragon on the Wilberforce Road between 1822 and 1846.4
OccupationHe was a settler and grazier.1

Family with

Sarah Smith b. 3 Dec 1772, d. 31 May 1857
Children
Last Edited29 May 2013

Citations

  1. [S76] Cobcroft Descendants, Record # 2.
  2. [S97] Michael Flynn, The 1790 Second Fleet, pp 207-208.
  3. [S4] M R Sainty and K A Johnson, NSW 1828 Census.
  4. [S139] Perry McIntyre & Adele Cathro, Thomas Dunn's Descendants, page: 44.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Richard William Cobcroft1

M, #11860, b. 3 January 1793, d. 24 July 1866
FatherJohn Frederick Cobcroft b. 9 Aug 1756, d. 4 Jun 1853
MotherSarah Smith b. 3 Dec 1772, d. 31 May 1857

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth3 January 1793Richard William Cobcroft was born on Thursday, 3 January 1793 at Parramatta, NSW, Australia.
He was the son of John Frederick Cobcroft and Sarah Smith.
Baptism17 March 1793Richard William Cobcroft was baptized on Sunday, 17 March 1793 at Church of England.
Marriage2 November 1812Richard William was married to Charlotte Smith, daughter of William Smith and Margaret Holmes, on Monday, 2 November 1812 at St Matthew's Church, Windsor, NSW, Australia.2
Marriage27 October 1829Richard William was married to Mary Ann Cross, daughter of John Cross and Mary Ann Davison, on Tuesday, 27 October 1829 at School House, Wilberforce, NSW, Australia.2
Death24 July 1866Richard William Cobcroft died on Tuesday, 24 July 1866 at Wilberforce, NSW, Australia, at age 73.2
BurialHe was buried at Wilberforce, NSW.2

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
OccupationRichard William Cobcroft was a settler and grazier.2

Family with 1

Charlotte Smith b. 28 Oct 1794, d. 30 Dec 1828
Children

Family with 2

Mary Ann Cross b. 2 Jan 1806, d. 26 Apr 1873
Children
Last Edited11 Nov 2004

Citations

  1. [S76] Cobcroft Descendants, Record # 2.
  2. [S76] Cobcroft Descendants, Record # 3.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.