Lucy Ellen Loiterton

F, #1081, b. 16 July 1888, d. 16 December 1978
Lucy Ellen Loiterton
FatherJohn Loiterton b. 6 Sep 1861, d. 12 Jul 1929
MotherMary Ann Guymer b. 22 May 1867, d. 23 Feb 1948
Relationships1st cousin 2 times removed of Robert Mote
4th great-granddaughter of Charles Loiterton
7th great-granddaughter of Thomas Sheather

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth16 July 1888Lucy Ellen Loiterton was born on Monday, 16 July 1888 at Kilrush, NSW, AustraliaG.
She was the daughter of John Loiterton and Mary Ann Guymer.
Marriage5 April 1911Lucy Ellen was married to Frank Corby, son of Joseph Corby and Eliza Crisp, on Wednesday, 5 April 1911 at Stockinbingal, NSW, AustraliaG.
Death16 December 1978Lucy Ellen Loiterton died on Saturday, 16 December 1978 at Stockinbingal, NSWG, at age 90.
Burial19 December 1978She was buried on 19 December 1978 at cemetery, Stockinbingal, NSW, AustraliaG.1

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1911As of 5 April 1911, her married name was Corby.

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
The Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG14 April 1911Lucy Ellen Loiterton was mentioned in an article in The Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG, on Friday, 14 April 1911 as follows:

CORBY - LOITERTON

A picturesque wedding took place at St. James' Church, Stockinbingal, on Wednesday, March 5th. The bridegroom was Frank, fifth son of Mr. Joseph Corby, of ' Sunnydale,' and the bride, Nellie, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. Loiterton, jun., of Mount Hope. Stockinbingal.

The church, waa very tastefully decorated with asparagus fern and evergreens, tied with white ribbons, done by the girl-friends of the bride. The ceremony was conducted by the Ven. Archdeacon Simpson. The bride, who waa given away by her father, wore white cache-de-soie draped with chiffon, and also wore a wreath and veil, and carried a ahower bouquet of cactus dahlias, autumn lily, maden hair and asparagus fern. The only ornament worn, waa a gold pendant and chain, the gift of the bridegroom. She waa attended by three bridesmaids? Misses Elsie and Eileen Loiterton (sisters), and Miss Ivy Corby (sister of bridegroom)? who were dressed in striped Jap. silk, with malines lace and trimming. The brooches with their bouquets were the gifts of the bridegroom. Mr. Bert. Corby was best man, and Mr. Herb. Loiterton groomsman. After the ceremony the guests ad journed to the residence of the parents, where the wedding breakfast was served, followed by a dance at night, when about 800 guests took part. Tbe happy couple left by the; after noon train for Sydney, where the honeymoon is to be spent. The bride's travelling dress was a navy coat and skirt, with hat to match. *

PRESENTS. Bridegroom to Bride, gold pendant and chain; Bride to Bridegroom, silver shaving outfit; Bridegroom to Bridesmaids, gold brooches ; Mr. J. Loiterton (father), cheque; Mrs. J . Loiterton (mother), house linen : Mr. Herb. Loiterton (brother), silver mid. hair brush aad comb ; Mr. L. Loiterton (bro.), silver cake dish; Walter and Allen (bros.), silver pickle jar ; Mr. Harold Loi terton (bro.), silver butter knife and sugar apoons ; Miss Elsie Loiterton (sister), silver serviette rings ; Miss Eileen Loiterton (sis.), set silver afternoon tea spoons in case ; Mr. C. Loiterton, senr., cheque; Mrs. C. Loiterton, senior, afternoon tea set; Misses Millie and Doris Loiterton (sisters), cut glass sauce decanters; Mr. J. Corby (father of Bridegroom), cheque: Mrs. J. Corby (mother), household furniture com plete ; Mr. Bert Corby (bro.), marble clock ; Mr. Ern. Corby (bro.) bro* ae lamp ; Mr. Victor Curby (bro), oak picture frame; Mr. Horace Corby (bro.)f pair a.m. vases. Mr. Earl Corby (tro.), pair a.m. perfume bottle#; Mr. Cyril Corby (bro.), jardmecr ; Min Ivy Corby («iater), s.m. jam dUh and apoon ; Mies Dnlcie Corby (lis.), pair perfume bo'.* ties; Miases Tbeliaa and lulda Corby (ais.), a.m.-.'iilad bowl ; Matters J)eeaoDd and Norman Corby (broe.), diver augir scuttle ; Miss BUietBeflsaas, silver breakfast cruet ; Mies May'BslImaa, afternoon tea set ; Mr. Chafei'BeUman, 'silver aaoce enut ; Mr. Alf* Bellman, pair ornaments ; Mr. and Mrs. C. Loitsrtq^j^m^dbnec^kBivfls and forks ; Mr. and Mrs. W. Loitertoo, dinner knives ; Mr. and Mrr. Jas. Loiterton,' silver baoked band mirror Mw- Maude Loiterton, tea «poo&s; 'Mr.*ah3Mn. S.'Corby, silver butter nub ; Mr. W. Corby, f-ea., silver jam dish ; ?Mr. Alf. and /.Misi-ETsie Corby. Gtit biscuit 'taml ; Mr. -Fercy and Miss Elsie Corby, aftez&ooa-tea aet ^JfrraaffiMri. A. Corby, silveni(ia.pot ;'Mr. ..and4iMifl. T. Corby, lamp ; Mus HJv':Corby, glass dish ; jfr, Peroy aud.MiM.M.' Corbv. afternoon tea set:

JJCewre. aa3,&fi-8ee Elliott^, sot oanrers and steel in case; Mr. i^Bar^ess. diver button book iao'd'sHoo lift ; Mr. B. NewbonDd, pair silver saltadn Csso ; Yen. ^ri-hdeabon Simp son, Biblel) Meters. Albert an4 Liobel Tetby, ink*tand uMr. K V, Begloy,'-: silver teapot ; iMescrs 8. Oohenasd Co., silver hot water kettle.«ndt e&nd ',i Miss M. Broady, silver toest taok-; jB&. Jss. and Miss* A^ Priestly, ritver o«g cruet ;*1Cm MoQaeen, rilver but ter knife; Mr. MoOo&ald, silver:-; breakfast or net ; Mies B. Finch, 'illvtr breakfast cruet.Mr. H. Leaby. sUver dinner -ruot-; Mr. A. XJurry, 'silrcr Jap* breiak. cruet Mr. and 'Mrs. T. N« ville, eilvendinner oruet ; Mr. Theo. . Webb, 'silver dinner cruet ; :Mr. B. A. Fincb, silver jam dish ; Mies A. Curry, sil ver sweet dish ; Miss P« Caoty, silver honey jar; Mr. and Mifsvli. Pi Forsyth, silver .eugarsouttlei;: Mr. CLMatxning, pair, photo frames ; Mr.2

Family with

Frank Corby b. 5 Dec 1889, d. 14 Jan 1946
Children
ChartsDescendant Chart - Charles Loiterton
Descendant Chart - Stephen Oxford
Descendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Last Edited25 Mar 2014

Citations

  1. [S69] Kay Lynette Gilmour, Manning Tree, Record # 44.
  2. [S999] Trove, online http://trove.nla.gov.au

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Kenneth Llewellen Loiterton

M, #1082, b. 31 May 1890, d. after 1990
Kenneth Lew Loiterton
Christmas 1903
FatherJohn Loiterton b. 6 Sep 1861, d. 12 Jul 1929
MotherMary Ann Guymer b. 22 May 1867, d. 23 Feb 1948
Relationships1st cousin 2 times removed of Robert Mote
4th great-grandson of Charles Loiterton
7th great-grandson of Thomas Sheather

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth31 May 1890Kenneth Llewellen Loiterton was born on Saturday, 31 May 1890 at Kilrush, NSW, AustraliaG.1
He was the son of John Loiterton and Mary Ann Guymer.
Marriage2 April 1913Kenneth Llewellen was married to Iris Lynda Raymond, daughter of Edward Raymond and Sarah Douglas, on Wednesday, 2 April 1913 at Stockinbingal, NSW, AustraliaG.
Deathafter 1990Kenneth Llewellen Loiterton died after 1990 at AustraliaG.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
NicknameKenneth Llewellen Loiterton was often called Lou.

Military Service

EventDateDetails
Milit-Beg13 May 1942Kenneth Llewellen Loiterton began military service on 13 May 1942 at Temora, NSW, AustraliaG.1

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
the Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG11 April 1913Kenneth Llewellen Loiterton was mentioned in an article in the Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG, on Friday, 11 April 1913 as follows:

WEDDING BELLS.

LOITERTON-RAYMOND.

Stockinbingal wore quite an animated appearance on Wednesday, the 2nd instant, the occasion being the marriage of Miss Iris Raymond, daughter of Mrs. G. Folcher, of ' Pine Shade, ' Gundibendyal, and the late Edward Raymond, of 'Balowra,' Cootamundra, to Kenneth, second son of Mr. and Mrs. John Loiterton, of 'Mount Hope,' Stockinbingal. At the appointed hour there must have been quite 150 friends of the young couple gathered within St. Joseph's R. C. Church, where the ceremony was per- formed by the Rev. Father Slattery.

The bride, who entered the church on the arm of her step-father, was becomingly attired in white satin, overdress of ninon, trimmed with pearls. She also wore a wreath of orange blossom and a silk tulle veil, and carried a bouquet of white crysanthemums and asparagus fern, gifts of the bridegroom.

The bridesmaids were Miss Eileen Morton and Miss Katie Molloy (cousin of bride). The former was attired in whitei satin, overdress of ninon; large white chip straw hat, trimmed with black and white plumes, and she wore a gold Nellie Stewart bangle, the gift of the bridegroom. The latter wore white silk; chip straw hat, trimmed with white silk and cord, and her gold bamboo bangle was the gift of the bridegroom. They each carried bouquets of white and pale blue flowers, satin streamers, and asparagus fern. Miss Gertie Raymond (sister of bride) and Miss Stella Carberry, who acted as trainbearers, wore white silk dresses and gold crosses and chains, gifts of the bridegroom.

The bridegroom was attended by Mr. Jas. Loughurst as best man, and Mr. F. Towers as groomsman.

As the bridal party left the church, the wedding march was played by Miss O. Young.

THE BREAKFAST.

After a short interval the company reassembled in the spacious Commercial Hall, where the host and hostess, Mr. and Mrs. Ellwood, had prepared the wedding breakfast, the beautifully decorated tables being laden with a most delectable menu. The cake, which was a beautiful three-decker, was the product of Mr. W. Tubman.

After full justice had been done the many good things provided, Mr. E. V. Begley, in a neat and happy speech, proposed the health of the newly wedded couple, to whom he paid warm tribute.

Mr. W. G. Noble, in his usual characteristic and humorous style, ably supported the toast, as did also Messrs E. Woodhouse and D. Mulcahy.

The bridegroom, in responding, thanked all for their many kind expressions towards himself and wife, which they very much appreciated.

'The Bridesmaids' was proposedby Mr. P. J. Green, and suitably acknowledged by Mr. Jas. Longhurst.

' The Parents of the Bride and Bridegroom' was proposed by Mr. John Neville. In doing so he expressed his pleasure at being honoured with such an important toast. He had not known them as long as some of thoso present, but for the time he had done so he made up for it in friendship. He added his good wishes. Mr. Folster suitably replied, expressing his thanks for the manner in which the toast had been proposed and received.

'The Chairman' having been duly proposed and honoured, the bride cut the cake, which was then handed round.

The happy couple left by the evening train for Sydney, where the honeymoon will be spent, the bride's travelling dress being a navy blue coat and skirt, navy velvet hat, relieved with white flumes, red berries and autumn leaves.

The following is a list of the presents:
Bride to bridegroom, gold sleeve links
Bridegroom to bride, gold diamond and sapphire ring.
Parents of bride, set of furs
Mr. Jno. Duffy (Wyalong), Gold pendant
Messrs. P. and D. Molloy (Wyalong), gold brooch
Mr. and Mrs. Emery (Barmedman) cheque
Mr. P. Hennessy, cheque
Mr. and Mrs. J Morton, pair vases and cheque
Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Matthews (Cootamundra), silver teapot
Mr. A. Armstrong (Cootamundra), silver mounted dinner cruet
Mr. and Mrs. Cohen (Cootamundra), silver mounted egg cruet
Mr. and Mrs. Jas Emery, half-dozen tea- spoons in case
Mr. and Mrs. J. Ellwood, rose bowl
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon (Springdale), ruby salt cellars
Mr. and Mrs. Tubman, silver mounted flower stand
Mr. and Mrs. W. Green, silver backed brush and comb
Mr. and Mrs. P. Green, silver serviette rings in case
Mr. and Mrs. F. Mulcahy, fancy vases
Mr and Mrs. Bowyer, half-doze tea spoons in case
Mr and Mrs. Wicht, teaset
Mr. and Mrs. J. Loiterton, honey jar
Mr. and Mrs. C. Loiterton, afternoon tea set
Mr. and Mrs. E Carberry, pair fruit dishes
Mr. and Mrs. Longhurst, fruit and cake stand
Mr. and Mrs. Roach, silver mounted jam dish
Mr. and Mrs. Towers (Sydney), silver teapot
Mr. and Mrs. Cann, table lamp.
Mr. and Mrs. A. Sloane, cut glass fruit and flower stand
Mr. and. Mrs. F. Carbarry, lamp
Mr. and Mrs. Woodhouse, silver mounted jam dish
Mr. and Mrs. Reg Curry, pair vases
Mr. and Mrs. T. C. Davies, table centre and cushion.
Mr. and Mrs. Stinson, butter dish
Mr. and Mrs. Webb, fancy vases.
Mr. and Mrs. T. Ellwood, set carvers in case
Mr. and Mrs. Spencer, fruit and flower stand
Mr. and Mrs. J. Mulcahy, cheese dish
Mr. and Mrs. Begley, elegant 8-day clock
Mr and Mrs Harrold, silver mounted dinner cruit
Mr. and Mrs. Hately, silver and cut glass butter dish
Mr. and Mrs. Neville, silver egg cruet
Mr. and Mrs. B. Witenden, silver mounted cake dish
Mr. and Mrs. Murdock, lamp
Mr. and Mrs. O'Brien, pin cushion
Mr. and Mrs. A W. Sloane, flower stand
Mr and Mrs. G. Morton, silver butter dish
Mr. and Mrs. Hickey, fruit dish
Mr and Mrs J Folster (Orange), afternoon tea set
Mr and Mrs. C. Reynolds, sweet set
Mr and Mrs. McCulloch, afternoon tea set
Mr and Mrs. West, fruit dishes
Mr. and Mrs. Pearce (Sydney), fancy vases
Mr and Mrs Scott (Sydney), ruby salt cellars
Mrs Davis, bread knife
Mrs E. Perkins, sen, breakfast cruet
Mrs J. Kearins (Sydney), cut lace table centre
Mrs. G. Curry, jam dish
Mrs Sheather, table centre and doyles
Mrs. Moody, Gipsy covers
Mr and Mrs D. White, washstand set
Mrs. Wilbers and family, pair pictures
Mrs. Lenane and family, silver cake fork in case
Mr. and Mrs. Donswan and family, afternoon tea set
Miss C. Mulcahy, cut glass sugar basin
Miss B. Walsh, bedroom lamp
Miss S. Mulcahy, water jug
Miss K. Molloy, cheese dish
Miss M. Molloy, pair, vases
Miss A. Duffy, pair fancy fruit dishes
Miss G. Raymond, salt cellars
Miss E. Morton, cut glass cake and fruit stand
Miss F. Sheather, egg cruet
Miss A. Emery (Barmedman), sweet dish
Miss White, lamp
Miss E. Sibraa, fruit dish
Miss O. Young, crumb tray and brush
Miss A. Sibraa, cut glass dish
Mr and Miss Mewburn, ruby jam dish
Mr. and Miss Murdock, afternoon tea set
Messrs. A. and G. Davis, jam dish
Mr. W. G. Noble, pair silver mounted jam dishes
Mr. M. Whalen, butter dish
Mr. A. Sheather, breakfast cruet
Mr. C. Lewis (Cootamundra), honey jar
Mr. W. Madden, cruet
Mr. Crystal, silver mounted flower stand
Mr. Yates, silver jam spoons
Mr. J. Longhurst, silver salts in case
Mr. O. Collet, bedroom clock.
Mr. B. Towers, water jug and glasses
Mr. A. Bellman, silver sugar scuttle
Mr. F. Towers, biscuit barrel
Mr. J. Mulcahy, water jug and glasses
Mr. J. Wilson, jam dish
Mr. J. Nw, silver mounted butter basin
Mr. H. Towers, silver mounted butter dish
Mr. V. Corby, set carvers in case
Mr. F. Bellman, silver teapot
Mr. C. Bellman, silver hand mirror
Mr. P.Mulcahy, biscuit barrel
Mr. P. Molloy, lamp
Mr. J. Noonan, fruit dishes
Mr. Jno. Longhurst, fruit dish
Masters E. and J. Fallon, water jug and glasses
Misses Martin, toilet boxes
Misses K. and C. Mulcahy, cream jugs
Mr. F. Corby, cheque.2


Other Details

LabelDateDetails
Note20 or 22 Jun 1990Kenneth Llewellen Loiterton appeared in an article in The Examiner, Moruya, NSW, AustraliaG, 20 or 22 Jun 1990 as follows: Lou Loiterton 100 Years and still going strong.
A man who lived most of his life in the Temora District celebrated his 100th birthday recently. He is Lou Loiterton, now residing in a Wagga nursing home.
The secret of longevity, according to centenarian Lou Loiterton, is eating and sleeping and a happy married life.
Lou celebrated his 100th birthday at the Wendy Hucker Nursing Home recently with his brother, two sisters and many of his eleven surviving children, 24 grandchildren and his great grandchildren around him.
Telegrams and letters with best wishes arrived for Lou from The Queen, the Governor-General Bill Hayden, Member for Wagga Joe Schipp and Member for Hume Wal Fife.
Born in a bark hut, Kenneth Llewellyn Loiterton was the second oldest child in a family of five girls and six boys.
His young life was spent on the family farm at Stockinbingal. He married a local girl, Iris Raymond, in 1913, and they moved to a property of their own in the area.
"I miss Iris. She was a wonderful person and we had a very happy marriage", said Lou.
Alan Loiterton was a school boy when he used to visit his brother Lou and Iris on their farm. He is now living at The Haven in Wagga and spends time with Lou every day.
"We were never really boys together", said Allan.
"But we play cards and chat together now."
Lou has two surviving sisters, Millicent Dixon from Salamander Bay and Doris Sanderson from Batteau Bay.
"If you average out our ages we have 90 each," said Mrs Dixon.
Lou and Iris Loiterton had 12 children. They left their farm in 1924 and Lou was employed until retirement with Vacuum Oil (later to become Mobil Oil), at Temora.
A top tennis player, Lou was champion of the Stockinbingal Tennis Club for many years.
While residents of Temora, where they spent many years, both Mr and Mrs Loiterton were very active in the community, especially in tennis circles where both were recognised among the town's best players.
After moving to Wagga, he became an active member of the Wagga Bowling Club.
The Loitertons came to live in The Haven in 1960. Iris Loiterton has since deceased and Lou moved into the Wendy Hucker Nursing Home in 1981.

Reprinted from the Wagga Daily Advertiser.

Family with

Iris Lynda Raymond b. 7 Nov 1893, d. 16 Jul 1978
Children
ChartsDescendant Chart - Charles Loiterton
Descendant Chart - Stephen Oxford
Descendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Last Edited18 Apr 2014

Citations

  1. [S342] WW II Roll, online http://www.ww2roll.gov.au
  2. [S999] Trove, online http://trove.nla.gov.au

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Elsie Maud Loiterton

F, #1083, b. 13 November 1892, d. 1 May 1970
Elsie Maud Loiterton
Christmas 1903
FatherJohn Loiterton b. 6 Sep 1861, d. 12 Jul 1929
MotherMary Ann Guymer b. 22 May 1867, d. 23 Feb 1948
Relationships1st cousin 2 times removed of Robert Mote
4th great-granddaughter of Charles Loiterton
7th great-granddaughter of Thomas Sheather

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth13 November 1892Elsie Maud Loiterton was born on Sunday, 13 November 1892 at Kilrush, NSW, AustraliaG.
She was the daughter of John Loiterton and Mary Ann Guymer.
Marriage17 February 1920Elsie Maud was married to Albert Forsyth Ball on Tuesday, 17 February 1920 at Christ Church, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG.
Death1 May 1970Elsie Maud Loiterton died on Friday, 1 May 1970 at Springwood, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 77.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1920As of 17 February 1920, her married name was Ball.
ChartsDescendant Chart - Charles Loiterton
Descendant Chart - Stephen Oxford
Descendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Last Edited21 Aug 2005

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Eileen Mary Loiterton

F, #1084, b. 23 December 1894
Eileen Mary Loiterton
FatherJohn Loiterton b. 6 Sep 1861, d. 12 Jul 1929
MotherMary Ann Guymer b. 22 May 1867, d. 23 Feb 1948
Relationships1st cousin 2 times removed of Robert Mote
4th great-granddaughter of Charles Loiterton
7th great-granddaughter of Thomas Sheather

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth23 December 1894Eileen Mary Loiterton was born on Sunday, 23 December 1894 at Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG.1,2
She was the daughter of John Loiterton and Mary Ann Guymer.
Marriage19 February 1919Eileen Mary was married to Hurtle Pengilly on Wednesday, 19 February 1919 at Christ Church, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG.
DeathEileen Mary Loiterton died at AustraliaG.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1919As of 19 February 1919, her married name was Pengilly.
ChartsDescendant Chart - Charles Loiterton
Descendant Chart - Stephen Oxford
Descendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Last Edited6 Nov 2011

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Cootamundra; Year: 1895; Number: 2798.
  2. [S966] Sasha Barlow, "Harriett & Edwin Kembrey," e-mail to Robert Mote, October 2011.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Walter Thomas Loiterton

M, #1085, b. 23 May 1897
Walter Thomas Loiterton
Christmas 1903
FatherJohn Loiterton b. 6 Sep 1861, d. 12 Jul 1929
MotherMary Ann Guymer b. 22 May 1867, d. 23 Feb 1948
Relationships1st cousin 2 times removed of Robert Mote
4th great-grandson of Charles Loiterton
7th great-grandson of Thomas Sheather

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth23 May 1897Walter Thomas Loiterton was born on Sunday, 23 May 1897 at Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG.
He was the son of John Loiterton and Mary Ann Guymer.
Marriage25 September 1919Walter Thomas was married to Kathleen Veronica Robertstella on Thursday, 25 September 1919 at Christ Church, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG.1
Marriage1935Walter Thomas was married to Lenore Wilhelmina McDermott in 1935 at Temora, NSW, AustraliaG.2

Family with

Lenore Wilhelmina McDermott b. 1909, d. 14 Jun 1973
Child
ChartsDescendant Chart - Charles Loiterton
Descendant Chart - Stephen Oxford
Descendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Last Edited5 May 2007

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of marriage registration: Cootamundra; Year: 1919; Number: 15393.
  2. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of marriage registration: Temora; Year: 1935; Number: 12840.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Alan Robert Loiterton

M, #1086, b. 19 May 1899
Alan Robert Loiterton
Christmas 1903
FatherJohn Loiterton b. 6 Sep 1861, d. 12 Jul 1929
MotherMary Ann Guymer b. 22 May 1867, d. 23 Feb 1948
Relationships1st cousin 2 times removed of Robert Mote
4th great-grandson of Charles Loiterton
7th great-grandson of Thomas Sheather

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth19 May 1899Alan Robert Loiterton was born on Friday, 19 May 1899 at Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG.
He was the son of John Loiterton and Mary Ann Guymer.
Marriage17 January 1923Alan Robert was married to Eliza Mary Kimber on Wednesday, 17 January 1923 at Stockinbingal, NSW, AustraliaG.
ChartsDescendant Chart - Charles Loiterton
Descendant Chart - Stephen Oxford
Descendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Last Edited12 Sep 1999

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Millicent Alma Loiterton

F, #1087, b. 20 December 1901
FatherJohn Loiterton b. 6 Sep 1861, d. 12 Jul 1929
MotherMary Ann Guymer b. 22 May 1867, d. 23 Feb 1948
Relationships1st cousin 2 times removed of Robert Mote
4th great-granddaughter of Charles Loiterton
7th great-granddaughter of Thomas Sheather

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth20 December 1901Millicent Alma Loiterton was born on Friday, 20 December 1901 at Mount Hope, Stockinbingal, NSW, AustraliaG.
She was the daughter of John Loiterton and Mary Ann Guymer.
Marriage3 February 1923Millicent Alma was married to Donald Dickson on Saturday, 3 February 1923 at Stockinbingal, NSWG.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
NicknameMillicent Alma Loiterton was often called Millie.
Married Name1923As of 3 February 1923, her married name was Dickson.

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
the Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG5 February 1923Millicent Alma Loiterton was mentioned in an article in the Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG, on Monday, 5 February 1923 as follows:

WEDDING BELLS.

DICKSON - LOITERTON.

Mr. Don. Dickson, fourth (twin) son of Ald. and Mrs. S. H. Dickson was married on Saturday to Miss Millie Loiterton, second youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Loiterton, Stockinbingal, at the residence of the bride's parents. The Rev. E. Smith officiated.1

ChartsDescendant Chart - Charles Loiterton
Descendant Chart - Stephen Oxford
Descendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Last Edited15 Apr 2014

Citations

  1. [S999] Trove, online http://trove.nla.gov.au

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Harold Leslie Loiterton

M, #1088, b. 25 January 1904, d. 20 June 1979
Harold Leslie Loiterton and his sister-in-law Marjorie Sawkins (Grimshaw) taken at Mt. Hope, Stockinbingal.
The photograph comes from the Patricia Duhigg (Grimshaw) collection.
FatherJohn Loiterton b. 6 Sep 1861, d. 12 Jul 1929
MotherMary Ann Guymer b. 22 May 1867, d. 23 Feb 1948
Relationships1st cousin 2 times removed of Robert Mote
4th great-grandson of Charles Loiterton
7th great-grandson of Thomas Sheather

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth25 January 1904Harold Leslie Loiterton was born on Monday, 25 January 1904 at Mount Hope, Stockinbingal, NSW, AustraliaG.1
He was the son of John Loiterton and Mary Ann Guymer.
Marriage26 December 1928Harold Leslie was married to Hilda Joan Grimshaw on Wednesday, 26 December 1928 at Neutral Bay, NSW, AustraliaG.
Death20 June 1979Harold Leslie Loiterton died on Wednesday, 20 June 1979 at Stockinbingal, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 75.

Military Service

EventDateDetails
Milit-Beg20 March 1942Harold Leslie Loiterton began military service on 20 March 1942 at Paddington, NSW, AustraliaG, and was discharged on 9 December 1943 while a Private in 2/14 Australian Light Field Ambulance. His Australian Army Service Number was NX93088.1
ChartsDescendant Chart - Charles Loiterton
Descendant Chart - Stephen Oxford
Descendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Last Edited30 Aug 2009

Citations

  1. [S342] WW II Roll, online http://www.ww2roll.gov.au

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Doris May Loiterton

F, #1089, b. 1 October 1907, d. 16 August 1995
FatherJohn Loiterton b. 6 Sep 1861, d. 12 Jul 1929
MotherMary Ann Guymer b. 22 May 1867, d. 23 Feb 1948
Relationships1st cousin 2 times removed of Robert Mote
4th great-granddaughter of Charles Loiterton
7th great-granddaughter of Thomas Sheather

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1 October 1907Doris May Loiterton was born on Tuesday, 1 October 1907 at Mount Hope, Stockinbingal, NSW, AustraliaG.
She was the daughter of John Loiterton and Mary Ann Guymer.
Marriage16 March 1937Doris May was married to David Cyril Sanderson on Tuesday, 16 March 1937 at Rangoon, BurmaG.
Death16 August 1995Doris May Loiterton died on Wednesday, 16 August 1995 at Gosford, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 87.1

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1937As of 16 March 1937, her married name was Sanderson.
ChartsDescendant Chart - Charles Loiterton
Descendant Chart - Stephen Oxford
Descendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Last Edited1 Jul 2009

Citations

  1. [S834] Kerri Sanderson, "David and Doris Sanderson," e-mail to Robert Mote, July 2009.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Eliza Loiterton

F, #1090, b. 18 November 1886, d. 27 July 1963
FatherCharles Loiterton b. 9 Mar 1864, d. 5 Jul 1923
MotherMary Ann Manning b. 1867, d. 4 Nov 1940
Relationships1st cousin 2 times removed of Robert Mote
4th great-granddaughter of Charles Loiterton
7th great-granddaughter of Thomas Sheather

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth18 November 1886Eliza Loiterton was born on Thursday, 18 November 1886 at Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG.
She was the daughter of Charles Loiterton and Mary Ann Manning.
Marriage15 April 1908Eliza Loiterton was a bridesmaid at the wedding of George Robert Ceeney and Emma Loiterton on Wednesday, 15 April 1908 at Church of England, Cullinga, NSW, AustraliaG.
Marriage6 May 1911Eliza was married to George Joseph Adams, son of George Harris Adams and Mary Dixon, on Saturday, 6 May 1911 at Cootamundra, NSWG.
Death27 July 1963Eliza Loiterton died on Saturday, 27 July 1963 at Maffra, VIC, AustraliaG, at age 76.1

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1911As of 6 May 1911, her married name was Adams.

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
the Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG22 April 1908Eliza Loiterton was mentioned in the newspaper article about George Robert Ceeney and Emma Loiterton on 22 April 1908 in the Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG;

Wedding.

CEENEY - LOITERTON.

The marriage of Emma, second eldest daughter of Mr. Charles Loiterton, of Jindalee, with George Robert, second son of the late Mr. Thomas Ceeney, of Cullinga, was solemnised in Christ Church, Callinga, on the 15th instant, by the Ven. Archdeacon Simpson. The bride, who was given away by her father, was attired in cream voile trimmed with white silk and lace, and wore the customary wreath and veil. She also carried a bouquet of white ???? dahlias, roses, carnations and maiden hair fern with streamers of white chiffon, and wore a gold brooch, the gift of the bridegroom. There were three bride maids, Miss Eliza Loiterton, sister of the bride, and the two Misses Webb. Miss E. Loiterton wore blue silk muslin trimmed with cream lace and insertion, cream hat trimmed with pink roses and blue chiffon, and wearing a gold brooch, the gift of the bridegroom. The two Misses Webb each wore navy blue voile trimmed with cream lace and insertion to match, burnt straw hats trimmed with pale blue ribbon and each wore a gold brooch, the gift of the bridegroom. Mr. A. S. Tilde , step brother of the bridegroom, acted as best man.

The reception was held at the residence of the bride's parents where the wedding was served to about 40 guests. The Ven. Archdeacon Simpson was Chairman and he proposed the health of the bride and bridegroom, the bridegroom, responding in the usual manner.

The presents were as follows :
Bride to bridegroom, silver mounted shaving outfit
Bridegroom to bride, gold brooch
Bridegroom to bridesmaids, gold brooches
Bridegroom to best man, gold sleeve links
Father of bride, cheque
Mother of bridegroom, half dozen cups and saucers and milk jug
Miss E. Loiterton (sister of bride), silver butter dish
Mr. Syd. Loiterton (brother of bride) silver dinner cruet .
Mr. Stephen Loiterton (brother of bride) silver egg cruet
Mr. and Mrs. J. Tilden, pair vases
Mr. S. Tilden, half dozan cups and saucers and ruby sugar basin
Mr. A. Tilden, pair bu ter dishes
Mr. F. Tilden, pair vases
Misses A. and E. Tilden, box of fancy work
Mr. and Mrs. B. Boxsell, half dozen tea cups and saucers and sugar basin
Master L. A. A. Boxsell, breakfast cruet
Mr. C. Loiterton, (grandfather of bride), cheque -
Mra. C. Loiterton, (grandmother of bride), friutstand, quarter dozon wine glasses, and pin tray
Mrs. Manning, silver tray and pair vases
Mrs. J. Manning, cake stand
Miss Maud Manning, pair silver mounted salt cellars
Miss Clara Manning, pair vases
Miss Elsie Manning, daisy worked pin cushion
Mr. and Mrs. J. Loiterton, half a dozen knives and forks
Miss Nell Loiterton, huckerback cushion
Misses. E and I. Loiterton, pair jam dishes
Mr. and Mrs. R. Mutch, salad bowl
Mr. and Mrs. T. Mutch, pair butter dishes and sugar basin
A. and R. Crandfield, silver mounted honey jar.
Mr. and Mrs. A. Armstrong, pair vauses
Mr. and Mrs. J. Meale, daisy mat and sugar basin
Miss M. Meale, ruby butter dish
Mrs. F. Quinlan, silver mouted biscuit barrel
Mr. F. Quinlan, shaving mug and brush
Miss T. Quinlan, silver mounted vause
Mr. H. Venables, sugar basin cream jug and dish
Mr. and Mrs. W. Muller, pair silver candle sticks
Mr. W. Boxsell, cheque
Mr. E. Boxsell, cheque
Mr. and Mrs. O. Webb, pair large pictures in frame
Miss Mary Webb, pair salt cellars
Miss Ollie Webb, honey jar
Mr. and Mrs. B. Noble, afternoon tea set
Mr. Joseph Faulks, cheque
Mr. and Mrs. Chalker, bedroom lamp
Miss M. Chalker, daisy worked pin cushion
Mr. and Mrs. R. Kemp, sugar basin
Mr R. Forsyth, cheque
Mr. and Mrs. Costigan, silver stud box and silver candle sticks.
Mr. Burgess, half dozen silver teaspoons
Mrs, Gravolin, half dozen cups and saucers
Miss E. Barker, pair large vases
Mr. W. Tuohey, large house lamp
Miss I. Poundsberry, table centre and pair cut glass cellars
Mr. Poundsberry, silver flour stand
Miss I. Crisp, pair vases
Mr. E. Crisp, silver tray, water jug and glasses
Mr. A. Crisp, pickle jar

The happy couple left to spend their honey moon at Wyalong. The bride's travelling dress was navy blue voile trimmed with blue silk and wore a hat to match.2



Family with

George Joseph Adams b. 13 Jul 1884, d. 14 Aug 1956
Children
ChartsDescendant Chart - Charles Loiterton
Descendant Chart - Stephen Oxford
Descendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Last Edited1 May 2010

Citations

  1. [S877] Pamela Harrod, "George Adams," e-mail to Robert Mote, April 2010.
  2. [S999] Trove, online http://trove.nla.gov.au

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Emma Loiterton

F, #1091, b. 3 November 1887, d. 1 October 1956
FatherCharles Loiterton b. 9 Mar 1864, d. 5 Jul 1923
MotherMary Ann Manning b. 1867, d. 4 Nov 1940
Relationships1st cousin 2 times removed of Robert Mote
4th great-granddaughter of Charles Loiterton
7th great-granddaughter of Thomas Sheather

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth3 November 1887Emma Loiterton was born on Thursday, 3 November 1887 at Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG.
She was the daughter of Charles Loiterton and Mary Ann Manning.
Marriage15 April 1908Emma was married to George Robert Ceeney, son of Thomas Ceeney and Esther Venables, on Wednesday, 15 April 1908 at Church of England, Cullinga, NSW, AustraliaG.
Death1 October 1956Emma Loiterton died on Monday, 1 October 1956 at Wallendbeen, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 68.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1908As of 15 April 1908, her married name was Ceeney.

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
the Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG22 April 1908Emma Loiterton was mentioned in an article in the Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG, on Wednesday, 22 April 1908 as follows:

Wedding.

CEENEY - LOITERTON.

The marriage of Emma, second eldest daughter of Mr. Charles Loiterton, of Jindalee, with George Robert, second son of the late Mr. Thomas Ceeney, of Cullinga, was solemnised in Christ Church, Callinga, on the 15th instant, by the Ven. Archdeacon Simpson. The bride, who was given away by her father, was attired in cream voile trimmed with white silk and lace, and wore the customary wreath and veil. She also carried a bouquet of white ???? dahlias, roses, carnations and maiden hair fern with streamers of white chiffon, and wore a gold brooch, the gift of the bridegroom. There were three bride maids, Miss Eliza Loiterton, sister of the bride, and the two Misses Webb. Miss E. Loiterton wore blue silk muslin trimmed with cream lace and insertion, cream hat trimmed with pink roses and blue chiffon, and wearing a gold brooch, the gift of the bridegroom. The two Misses Webb each wore navy blue voile trimmed with cream lace and insertion to match, burnt straw hats trimmed with pale blue ribbon and each wore a gold brooch, the gift of the bridegroom. Mr. A. S. Tilde , step brother of the bridegroom, acted as best man.

The reception was held at the residence of the bride's parents where the wedding was served to about 40 guests. The Ven. Archdeacon Simpson was Chairman and he proposed the health of the bride and bridegroom, the bridegroom, responding in the usual manner.

The presents were as follows :
Bride to bridegroom, silver mounted shaving outfit
Bridegroom to bride, gold brooch
Bridegroom to bridesmaids, gold brooches
Bridegroom to best man, gold sleeve links
Father of bride, cheque
Mother of bridegroom, half dozen cups and saucers and milk jug
Miss E. Loiterton (sister of bride), silver butter dish
Mr. Syd. Loiterton (brother of bride) silver dinner cruet .
Mr. Stephen Loiterton (brother of bride) silver egg cruet
Mr. and Mrs. J. Tilden, pair vases
Mr. S. Tilden, half dozan cups and saucers and ruby sugar basin
Mr. A. Tilden, pair bu ter dishes
Mr. F. Tilden, pair vases
Misses A. and E. Tilden, box of fancy work
Mr. and Mrs. B. Boxsell, half dozen tea cups and saucers and sugar basin
Master L. A. A. Boxsell, breakfast cruet
Mr. C. Loiterton, (grandfather of bride), cheque -
Mra. C. Loiterton, (grandmother of bride), friutstand, quarter dozon wine glasses, and pin tray
Mrs. Manning, silver tray and pair vases
Mrs. J. Manning, cake stand
Miss Maud Manning, pair silver mounted salt cellars
Miss Clara Manning, pair vases
Miss Elsie Manning, daisy worked pin cushion
Mr. and Mrs. J. Loiterton, half a dozen knives and forks
Miss Nell Loiterton, huckerback cushion
Misses. E and I. Loiterton, pair jam dishes
Mr. and Mrs. R. Mutch, salad bowl
Mr. and Mrs. T. Mutch, pair butter dishes and sugar basin
A. and R. Crandfield, silver mounted honey jar.
Mr. and Mrs. A. Armstrong, pair vauses
Mr. and Mrs. J. Meale, daisy mat and sugar basin
Miss M. Meale, ruby butter dish
Mrs. F. Quinlan, silver mouted biscuit barrel
Mr. F. Quinlan, shaving mug and brush
Miss T. Quinlan, silver mounted vause
Mr. H. Venables, sugar basin cream jug and dish
Mr. and Mrs. W. Muller, pair silver candle sticks
Mr. W. Boxsell, cheque
Mr. E. Boxsell, cheque
Mr. and Mrs. O. Webb, pair large pictures in frame
Miss Mary Webb, pair salt cellars
Miss Ollie Webb, honey jar
Mr. and Mrs. B. Noble, afternoon tea set
Mr. Joseph Faulks, cheque
Mr. and Mrs. Chalker, bedroom lamp
Miss M. Chalker, daisy worked pin cushion
Mr. and Mrs. R. Kemp, sugar basin
Mr R. Forsyth, cheque
Mr. and Mrs. Costigan, silver stud box and silver candle sticks.
Mr. Burgess, half dozen silver teaspoons
Mrs, Gravolin, half dozen cups and saucers
Miss E. Barker, pair large vases
Mr. W. Tuohey, large house lamp
Miss I. Poundsberry, table centre and pair cut glass cellars
Mr. Poundsberry, silver flour stand
Miss I. Crisp, pair vases
Mr. E. Crisp, silver tray, water jug and glasses
Mr. A. Crisp, pickle jar

The happy couple left to spend their honey moon at Wyalong. The bride's travelling dress was navy blue voile trimmed with blue silk and wore a hat to match.1



Other Details

LabelDateDetails
NoteEmma Loiterton and George Robert Ceeney

lived at Cullinga after their marriage. Soon after they married George had a bad fall from a horse which resulted in the loss of an eye. George worked on a property called "The Meadows". He later share farmed on Donald Mackay's property and the seven children grew up and went to school from there. When it was sold they moved to live at "Wargunyah", a house at Wallendbeen opposite the Presbyterian Church. He then went share farming on Bert Boxsell's property, "Cherrygrove", and during one year was burnt out in a bushfire that began at Jindalee and went as far as Harden. The harvester and horses were saved by driving them onto a ploughed paddock nearby. George retired after share farming on Bassingthwaighte's property "Allowrie" and he and Emma lived there for the rest of their lives. They had 9 children, 5 boys and 4 girls.

Family with

George Robert Ceeney b. 26 May 1878, d. 27 May 1947
Children
ChartsDescendant Chart - Charles Loiterton
Descendant Chart - Stephen Oxford
Descendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Last Edited5 Apr 2014

Citations

  1. [S999] Trove, online http://trove.nla.gov.au

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Sydney Loiterton

M, #1092, b. 5 September 1889, d. 31 December 1947
FatherCharles Loiterton b. 9 Mar 1864, d. 5 Jul 1923
MotherMary Ann Manning b. 1867, d. 4 Nov 1940
Relationships1st cousin 2 times removed of Robert Mote
4th great-grandson of Charles Loiterton
7th great-grandson of Thomas Sheather

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth5 September 1889Sydney Loiterton was born on Thursday, 5 September 1889 at Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG.
He was the son of Charles Loiterton and Mary Ann Manning.
Marriage7 August 1926Sydney was married to Annie May Coddington, daughter of William Coddington and Annie Kirk, on Saturday, 7 August 1926 at Christ Church, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG.
Death31 December 1947Sydney Loiterton died on Wednesday, 31 December 1947 at Harden, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 58.

Criminal Record

DatePlaceDetails
May 1905Sydney Loiterton was pleaded guilty to driving around a corner at a pace faster than a walk. He was fined five shillings and ordered to pay four shillings and ten pence in costs. in May 1905.1

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
the Cootamundra Daily Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG3 January 1947Sydney Loiterton was mentioned in an article in the Cootamundra Daily Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG, on Friday, 3 January 1947 as follows:

OBITUARY

MR. SID. LOITERTON, of Wallendbeen

The death occurred, at the home of his brother Fred, on Tuesday evening, of Mr. Sidney Loiterton, 58, well known Wallendbeen identity.

Deceased had been assisting his brother Mr Fred Loiterton, with the harvesting, and collapsed after work on Tuesday afternoon.

The Cootamundra Ambulance was called out, and brought him to the District Hospital, where he failed to rally.

The late Mr. Loiterton's wife predeceased him on January 3, 1943. There were no children. She was Annie May.

The widow was formerly Annie May Coddington, of Wallendbeen.

Surviving brothers and sisters are: Steve, Don, Fred, and Ken, Mrs. G. Ceeney, Mrs. Adams (Vic), Mrs. Troy (Woollongong), Mrs. Roy Duffey, and Mrs. Ivor Davies.

The remains were laid to rest in the Church of England portion of the Murrumburrah cemetery yesterday, at 11 a.m.

Deceased was the eldest son of the late Charles Loiterton, Wallendbeen.

A brother, Jim, died last July, and another brother, George, was electrocuted at Wallendbeen.2

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
End-LineSydney Loiterton has no known descendants.
ChartsDescendant Chart - Charles Loiterton
Descendant Chart - Stephen Oxford
Descendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Last Edited18 Apr 2014

Citations

  1. [S22] Ian Douglas Loiterton, A Loiterton History, page 68.
  2. [S999] Trove, online http://trove.nla.gov.au

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Stephen Loiterton

M, #1093, b. 13 August 1891, d. 2 January 1974
FatherCharles Loiterton b. 9 Mar 1864, d. 5 Jul 1923
MotherMary Ann Manning b. 1867, d. 4 Nov 1940
Relationships1st cousin 2 times removed of Robert Mote
4th great-grandson of Charles Loiterton
7th great-grandson of Thomas Sheather

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth13 August 1891Stephen Loiterton was born on Thursday, 13 August 1891 at Wallendbeen, NSW, AustraliaG.1
He was the son of Charles Loiterton and Mary Ann Manning.
Marriage12 July 1916Stephen was married to Mary Estelle Douglas, daughter of Edward Douglas and Annie Christina Vincent, on Wednesday, 12 July 1916 at Christ Church, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG.
Death2 January 1974Stephen Loiterton died on Wednesday, 2 January 1974 at Batemans Bay, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 82.
Burial4 January 1974He was buried on 4 January 1974 at Cemetery, Batemans Bay, NSW, AustraliaG.2

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
NicknameStephen Loiterton was often called Steve.

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
The Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG7 January 1974Stephen Loiterton had an obituary appear in The Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG, on Monday, 7 January 1974 as follows: Steven Loiterton
The Funeral of Steven Loiterton, of Bateman's Bay, who died last wednesday at the age of 84 years, was held at Bateman's Bay on Friday.
Mr Loiterton had moved to the coastal resort about eight years ago and besides his wife, he is survived by an adult family of two sons and two daughters.
They are Clint and Dudley and Kay (Mrs Hulford) of Cootamundra and Gwen (Mrs Davies) of Canberra.2

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
NoteIn 1898, seven year old Steve was a pupil at the West Jindalee School. His sisters Eliza and Emma and brothers Syd and Jim were also attending the same school. At this stage Steve's father had a 150 acre property located one and a half miles from the school. This was somewhere in the West Jindalee area.

The family later moved to "Forest Home" about three miles from Wallendbeen on the Old Gundagai Road. It is thought that Steve also attended the school at Jindalee indicating that the family had moved away from the West Jindalee area at this time. Perhaps this is when they moved to "Forest Home". The two youngest children, Ivy and Will were attending the Jindalee School in 1920. Steve and his brothers Don and Jim were known to wag school quite often, preferring to spend their time on the reserve rather that in the classroom. There was one story that Steve used to relate to the family regularly and he would end up in fits of laughter while telling it. On one occasion, on their way home from school, Steve and Jim decided to indulge in a little target practice by hurling pads of cow manure at a passing train at Jindalee. They were caught at it and ended up in trouble as a result. No doubt it wasn't the first time they had done this and it probably wasn't the last. Steve left school when he was about 12 years old to work on the farm.

Steve and his brother Jim later moved to Muttama to farm. They were wheat farmers, using horse drawn ploughs, on Armitage's property of "Sheep Station Creek" which was next to the Douglas property of "Hillside". The property was about 2 miles from Muttama. They were share farmers with the owner, and were not too popular with him when they ring barked two large gum trees to clear a paddock for ploughing.

It was obviously during his time working at Muttama that he met Mary. Mary's sister Ett remembered the day Steve arrived with his horse and sulky to take Mary to the Cootamundra Show. The pony was a little bit wild and used to rear up on its back legs when it was urged to move off. Eventually the horse managed to get things right and they disappeared in a cloud of dust down the road.

In March 1916 Steve and Jim sold by auction all of their horses and farm machinery as they intended enlisting for active service. In April of 1916 a farewell social function was held in Muttama to honour the local men who had volunteered for active service. Steve was one of those present, and farewelled at the banquet, but for some reason did not enlist. His brother Jim did enlist and go to the war but apparently was not at the farewell. No-one seems to know why Steve didn't end up in the army with his brother Jim.

Steve and Mary were married on 12 July of this same year. It is thought that they may have farmed with Steve's father Charles for a while after this but they farmed on the "Douglas Park" property at Jindalee until early in 1919. The fact that the notice refers to his farming plant as almost new is an indication that he had not perhaps been on this property for long. As indicated in the notice Steve was about to give up farming and try his hand at something else.

Steve and Mary together with their first child, Clinton who was not yet two years old, moved into Cootamundra during 1919 and were to live at 38 Sutton Street for the next forty five years. The other three children were born in Cootamundra. Steve conducted a hire car business in Cootamundra. A hire car was one of the few alternatives if you had to get to a town not linked to Cootamundra by rail. A great deal of the work involved taking people to the horse races and Steve used to drive bookies to such places as Tumut and Gundagai. The bookies often stayed overnight and Steve would bring them back the next day. He also conveyed commercial travellers and used to drive one of the local doctors about quite a bit. He often took a girl to Frampton to visit her boyfriend and had to wait in the car while "they made love half the night". On one occasion, as he was crossing the "top gates" his passenger opened the newspaper and realised that he had won the lottery. That was as far as that particular trip went as they returned to celebrate.

Early in his hire car days, Steve had an accident involving a collision with a horse. He was driving along Temora Road on the way to the races and had to cross Freer's Bridge over the Muttama Creek. It had been a wet year and people walking to the races had to walk up onto the roadway in order to get on the bridge and cross the creek. As a result there were a lot of people on the bridge at the one time. A jockey was riding a horse across the bridge and leading another. Something frightened the second horse and it pulled back and the jockey had to let it go. The horse collided with Steve' a car and was so badly injured that it had to be destroyed. Steve was successfully sued by the owner and had to pay up. This must have resulted in a considerable financial blow to the family. The judge claimed that the jockey had no control over the horse but that Steve had control over his car and was therefore liable.

The car he drove in his business was a Hudson Super Six and the fare was about sixpence per mile. The car was able to accommodate the driver and seven passengers. The front seat held two passengers, the rear seat three, and there were two fold down seats at the rear of the front seat. The car was large and heavy and had narrow solid rubber tyres. The hood was made of canvas and had celluloid side and rear windows. Steve conducted this business before the time of petrol bowsers and obtained his petrol supplies in 4 gallon tins. These came packed in wooden crates, each crate containing two cans. When empty the petrol cans were useful for all sorts of things. They made quite good buckets and could be cut and opened out to make a washing tub and drying rack for dishes. In January and February, 1920 the following advertisement appeared in the Cootamundra Herald:


MOTOR SERVICE


MR.S. LOITERTON wishes to notify the public that he now has the 'phone on to private house, No 192. All Orders for Cars promptly attended to.


At one stage there was a dispute between the hire car owners and the local taxi drivers. There were no clearly defined guidelines as to where the hire cars could ply their trade as distinct from the taxis. On one occasion Mary's father organised Steve and another driver to take the Douglas family to Burrinjuck. This may have been around 1930 when electricity from Burrinjuck Dam was about to be supplied to the Cootamundra area. Quite a few of the locals made the trip to see the source of this new and convenient form of energy.

Conditions in the little house in Sutton Street were a little more primitive than we are used to today. Kerosene lamps were the main source of lighting up until the early 1930's. Electricity wasn't connected to the house until a couple of years after it was available in Cootamundra. A copper with a wood fire below it was used to heat water for baths. The hot water was then transferred by bucket into a large metal bath tub. Bathing was, as a result, generally a weekly event rather than a nightly one. When the copper was later replaced with a chip heater, life became considerably easier. A water safe was used to keep food cool and these were later replaced by ice boxes. More efficient kerosene or gas refrigerators were to in turn replace the ice box. Perhaps the one luxury that the family enjoyed was having a car. Apart from those owned by some farmers and local businessmen there were few cars about. Virtually no-one living and working in the town owned a car.

Steve conducted his hire car business for about ten years, but with the onset of the depression few people could afford to hire cars and he had to look for another way of earning a living. During the depression he worked on the water pipeline from Jugiong across the Cowangs. The job involved digging the trench for the pipeline. All the digging was of course done by hand and a specified length of trench had to be completed each day. This made life difficult if you happened to come across a rocky section of ground.

Later, Steve worked "lumping wheat" at Shepherd's Siding which is between Junee and Wagga. His son Clinton often helped him and occasionally was allowed to drive the ute back home. A six cylinder Buick that Steve had used for a time in the hire car business had been converted to a ute and used for carting wheat. It must have been very hard work for a small man. Clinton would move the bags of wheat to the side of the waggon and Steve would then carry them one at a time on his shoulder up the "steps" of bags and add them to the top of the stack. When the stack reached full height the base would be extended by one bag and the process continued. Later the wheat would be reloaded onto small trucks and horse drawn waggons for transport to the silo. The trucks were only small and carried about one ton which amounted to 25 bags of wheat.

During his life, Steve was a keen shooter. He owned his own shotgun at the age of thirteen and frequently spent time around the local dams and paddocks after ducks and rabbits. After the crops had been harvested there were always plenty of quail amongst the stubble. He also achieved considerable successes in competitions. He is known to have taken part in clay pigeon shooting competitions when in his early twenties and perhaps also before that. In July 1918 Steve was in a competition which carried £50 total prize money. He and six others won £5 each in the initial part of the competition and then had to shoot off for the remaining money. Steve received a special mention as "having shot extra well, grossing 34 birds out of 37 released to him on the first barrel". In November of that same year he took part in a shoot that consisted of a number of different types of competitions. He was equal first in the "5 Bird Starling Match", the "No. 1 Sweep" and the "£1 Pigeon Sweep". In the big event of the day, the "£50 Pigeon Match" he took out the major share of the prize money by winning £15. Steve also won other prizes in shooting competitions including a number of sashes and a canteen of cutlery. He travelled to Melbourne in about 1952 or 1953 to compete. Apparently the other competitors were more than amazed at Steve fronting up to the competition with his old hammer action shotgun when they all had automatic or semi-automatic guns.

Steve loved the outdoors and his other favourite pastime was undoubtedly fishing. Fishing stories and stories of fishing trips were commonly related and fishing was certainly something that Steve knew much about and was also good at. One photo shows him in his early thirties in the back yard with his catch of Murray Cod. A friend and five year old son Dudley are also in the photo and they were displaying the result of their fishing trip. Dad remembers them building a boat before this trip. It was little more than a large box and the joints had been sealed with pitch. The fishing technique used was a simple one, and involved stringing a line between two trees in the river. Large hooks were suspended from this line and baited with birds and pieces of rabbit. The weights of the fish are written onto the surface of the photo, the smallest a mere thirty pounds, followed by a forty five pounder with the largest one weighing in at seventy two pounds. The biggest fish was somewhat larger than Dudley. One story that is remembered and told is that of the fire in the tent up at Burrinjuck. Clinton, Dudley and Steve were all off checking their set lines around the bank of the dam. They had pitched their tent in an open area and had a fire slowly burning away some distance from it. Somehow the fire managed to find its way from where it was, across in the direction of the tent, perhaps by igniting leaves or dry grass on the ground. By the time they discovered what had happened the tent was well alight. Their bedding was also affected and the blankets had holes burned in them. When they returned home Mary cut the good pieces out of the blankets and stitched them together and these were the only blankets that they were allowed to take fishing with them on future trips. The smell of burnt wool stayed with the blankets.

Steve finished his working life on the Shire Council. He mainly worked with the road crews and drove a large truck. He worked there until his retirement and he and Mary moved to live in Batehaven in 1965. Steve apparently wasn't too keen on the idea at first but was talked into it by other members of the family.

Living on the south coast, he was able to spend a considerable amount of his time indulging in one of his favourite pastimes, fishing. He remained a keen gardener and must have enjoyed the longer growing season. He had no trouble at all getting ripe tomatoes by Christmas and he was always keen to have a better garden than his brother Don who of course had moved to Batemans Bay some years before. Steve died following a heart attack on 2 January 1974.3

Family with

Mary Estelle Douglas b. 31 Aug 1893, d. 3 Nov 1985
Child
ChartsDescendant Chart - Charles Loiterton
Descendant Chart - Stephen Oxford
Descendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

Citations

  1. [S22] Ian Douglas Loiterton, A Loiterton History, page 104.
  2. [S22] Ian Douglas Loiterton, A Loiterton History, page 88.
  3. [S22] Ian Douglas Loiterton, A Loiterton History, page 79.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

James Henry Loiterton

M, #1094, b. 25 January 1893, d. 7 August 1946
FatherCharles Loiterton b. 9 Mar 1864, d. 5 Jul 1923
MotherMary Ann Manning b. 1867, d. 4 Nov 1940
Relationships1st cousin 2 times removed of Robert Mote
4th great-grandson of Charles Loiterton
7th great-grandson of Thomas Sheather

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth25 January 1893James Henry Loiterton was born on Wednesday, 25 January 1893 at Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG. The head stone on his grave has his birth date as 25.1.1891.1
He was the son of Charles Loiterton and Mary Ann Manning.
Death7 August 1946James Henry Loiterton died on Wednesday, 7 August 1946 at Bookham, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 53.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
NicknameJames Henry Loiterton was often called Jim.

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
the Cootamundra Daily Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG3 January 1947James Henry Loiterton was mentioned in the newspaper article about Sydney Loiterton on 3 January 1947 in the Cootamundra Daily Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG;

OBITUARY

MR. SID. LOITERTON, of Wallendbeen

The death occurred, at the home of his brother Fred, on Tuesday evening, of Mr. Sidney Loiterton, 58, well known Wallendbeen identity.

Deceased had been assisting his brother Mr Fred Loiterton, with the harvesting, and collapsed after work on Tuesday afternoon.

The Cootamundra Ambulance was called out, and brought him to the District Hospital, where he failed to rally.

The late Mr. Loiterton's wife predeceased him on January 3, 1943. There were no children. She was Annie May.

The widow was formerly Annie May Coddington, of Wallendbeen.

Surviving brothers and sisters are: Steve, Don, Fred, and Ken, Mrs. G. Ceeney, Mrs. Adams (Vic), Mrs. Troy (Woollongong), Mrs. Roy Duffey, and Mrs. Ivor Davies.

The remains were laid to rest in the Church of England portion of the Murrumburrah cemetery yesterday, at 11 a.m.

Deceased was the eldest son of the late Charles Loiterton, Wallendbeen.

A brother, Jim, died last July, and another brother, George, was electrocuted at Wallendbeen.2

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
ArticleIn March of 1916, Jim and brother Steve, organised an auction to sell off all of their horses and farm machinery. They had been farming at Sheep Station Creek, two miles from Muttama. In April of the same year, a farewell social function was held in Muttama to farewell the local boys who had volunteered for active service. A banquet was held in the Commercial Hotel at Muttama. The list of those present includes S. Loiterton but there is no mention of James. Oddly enough, James was the one who ended up going overseas, whereas, for some unknown reason, Steve was to remain at home.

Jim enlisted the following month at the age of 23 years and joined the 56th Battalion. He was only a small person, being five feet six inches tall and weighing only ten stone. He had a fair complexion with fair hair and blue eyes.

In August 1916, Jim, who had been in the local camp, was in the Goulburn camp and was about to return home on final leave. On 15 September 1916 a farewell for Jim was held at his parent's residence, "Forest Home". His friends and relatives were there "……….to give him a good rousing send-off on his way to the front. A most enjoyable evening was spent - dancing being kept up until the early hours. Jim was wished every success by old friends, and one person was anxious that he should bring back the Kaiser's scalp. The well known hospitality of Mr. and Mrs. Loiterton was well to the fore, and Mrs. Loiterton excelled herself in producing dainties. We all join in giving Jim our heartiest plaudits in his manly action in proceeding to the front to battle for his home and country. He left here on Tuesday night's mail".

On 7 October, Jim embarked from Sydney on board the "Ceramic", arriving at Plymouth six weeks later. A month after arrival he was admitted to Fovant Military Hospital in Wiltshire, where he was placed under observation for tonsillitis. He was discharged three weeks later, and on 8 February 1917, was off to France aboard the "SS Invieta". A mere month later Jim was back in hospital, this time in France, and suffering from a scalp wound and concussion. He was only there for 6 days before rejoining his unit. Just a few weeks after that, he was again sick and back in hospital in Rouen where he was to spend several weeks. It appears that confusion reigned during that particular time as there were conflicting reports. At some stage, Jim was thought to have been missing in action and believed killed, and two weeks later is reported as rejoining his unit. A week after that he was discovered in hospital, where he had apparently been all this time.

In May of 1917, Jim was wounded in action at Bulogne. He received gunshot wounds to both thighs and to his left hand. He was shipped back to England and spent more than 3 months at the Brook War Hospital. He was sent back to Australia aboard the "Ulysses", arriving on 13 November and was discharged a month later. In May of the following year, Private James Henry Loiterton of Jindalee was among the 29 soldiers who were present on the stage of the Cootamundra Town Hall to be welcomed home.

Jim was to remain single, and for many years managed a fleet of fishing boats at Woolgarlowe, on Burrinjuck Dam. He lived a quiet, hermit-like existence there until he died in 1946.3
ChartsDescendant Chart - Charles Loiterton
Descendant Chart - Stephen Oxford
Descendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Last Edited7 Oct 2004

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Cootamundra; Year 1893; Number: 11737.
  2. [S999] Trove, online http://trove.nla.gov.au
  3. [S22] Ian Douglas Loiterton, A Loiterton History, page 68.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Maude Loiterton

F, #1095, b. 18 June 1895, d. between 1961 and 1967
FatherCharles Loiterton b. 9 Mar 1864, d. 5 Jul 1923
MotherMary Ann Manning b. 1867, d. 4 Nov 1940
Relationships1st cousin 2 times removed of Robert Mote
4th great-granddaughter of Charles Loiterton
7th great-granddaughter of Thomas Sheather

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth18 June 1895Maude Loiterton was born on Tuesday, 18 June 1895 at Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG.
She was the daughter of Charles Loiterton and Mary Ann Manning.
Marriage21 October 1914Maude was married to Ronald Leonard Troy, son of George Troy and Emily Crisp, on Wednesday, 21 October 1914 at Christ Church, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG.
Deathbetween 1961 and 1967Maude Loiterton died between 1961 and 1967 at AustraliaG.1

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1914As of 21 October 1914, her married name was Troy.
ChartsDescendant Chart - Charles Loiterton
Descendant Chart - Stephen Oxford
Descendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

Citations

  1. [S22] Ian Douglas Loiterton, A Loiterton History, page 61.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Donald Charles Loiterton

M, #1096, b. 13 August 1897, d. 10 November 1977
FatherCharles Loiterton b. 9 Mar 1864, d. 5 Jul 1923
MotherMary Ann Manning b. 1867, d. 4 Nov 1940
Relationships1st cousin 2 times removed of Robert Mote
4th great-grandson of Charles Loiterton
7th great-grandson of Thomas Sheather

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth13 August 1897Donald Charles Loiterton was born on Friday, 13 August 1897 at Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG.1
He was the son of Charles Loiterton and Mary Ann Manning.
Marriage29 December 1950Donald Charles was married to Harriet Maude Douglas, daughter of Edward Douglas and Annie Christina Vincent, on Friday, 29 December 1950 at Gundagai, NSW, AustraliaG.
Death10 November 1977Donald Charles Loiterton died on Thursday, 10 November 1977 at Batemans Bay, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 80.1
Burialafter 10 November 1977He was buried after 10 November 1977 at Cootamundra, NSWG.1

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
NicknameDonald Charles Loiterton was often called Don.

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
NoteDon was born at Wallendbeen and lived there for the early part of his life. It is not certain if he attended the West Jindalee school as his older brothers and sisters had done at least up to 1898. The family may have moved to "Forest Home" at some time after this which would have meant that the Jindalee or Wallendbeen schools would have been much closer. Don and his older brothers Steve and Jim often wagged school, preferring to spend their time on the reserve.

Don and Jim at one stage worked for George Forsyth, sewing bags of wheat at harvest time and looking after the horse team.

For some years Don ran a garage in Wallendbeen, which he built in 1928. The garage which looked little more than a large galvanised iron shed still stood in King Street, opposite the post office in 1988. It had the word "Garage" in large black letters on the back and side walls. Don would walk from his mother's house in Grey Street to and from work in the garage each day. In 1930, while still at the garage, he advertised his Overland car for sale for £55. Later that year he returned from Sydney with a new Whippet car. During the Depression, car owners still wanted their cars repaired but weren't so keen to pay.

Don was a keen tennis player and at various stages during the late 20's and early 30's received mentions as a member of the Wallendbeen team. He excelled at the game and continued playing into his 70's.

Don later left the garage and bought a property near Muttama to return to what he liked doing best. It was at this stage that he met Ett, as his property wasn't that far from "Hillside".

At some later stage, Don purchased the "Rosemeadow" property near Cootamundra. Don and Ett moved to Billimari near Canowindra after their marriage in 1950 and took up a 300 acre wheat and sheep farm. Ian Loiterton remembers visiting this farm when he was about 14 years old. Don was a tinkerer and Ian recalls being fascinated by some of the things that he had made. He could make just about anything out of bits and pieces he found lying around. Ian remembers him showing him a homemade door catch, and a gear for one of his machines that he had cut from a steel shaft with a hack saw. Ian was even more impressed when he discovered that Don had done all of this with only one good hand. His other hand had fallen victim to the careless use of a chaff cutter which had relieved him of its fingers.

Apart from being inventive, Don was also persistant. At one stage he had an old metal wheeled tractor that he decided to convert to rubber tyres. He bought the tyres and rims and then began to modify the wheels to suit. This involved heating the spokes to bend them and then drilling holes in them in order to be able to fasten the rims. Don apparently ended up breaking numerous drill bits in the process of drilling the hard steel, but was determined that this was the way that he was going to complete the job.

Like Steve, Don was a keen shooter. On one occasion his dog was in full pursuit of a rabbit and about to catch it. The rabbit, however, was heading directly for its burrow and stood a more than fair chance of escaping the dog's mouth. Just as the rabbit was about to enter the burrow, Don raised his gun and shot it -right in front of the dog's nose!

After retiring, Don and Ett sold up and went to live at Bateman's Bay. Even though the house was a very basic one, Don wasn't too fussed with trying to change things and thought it quite adequate as it was. He was content to persevere with a chip heater in the bathroom at a time when most of us would never think of trying to do without a modern hot water system.

Don broke his hip after a fall in later life and didn't enjoy full health after that time. He died after a short illness.
ChartsDescendant Chart - Charles Loiterton
Descendant Chart - Stephen Oxford
Descendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Last Edited12 Sep 1999

Citations

  1. [S22] Ian Douglas Loiterton, A Loiterton History, page 61.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Lucy May Loiterton

F, #1097, b. 13 August 1899, d. 9 March 1973
FatherCharles Loiterton b. 9 Mar 1864, d. 5 Jul 1923
MotherMary Ann Manning b. 1867, d. 4 Nov 1940
Relationships1st cousin 2 times removed of Robert Mote
4th great-granddaughter of Charles Loiterton
7th great-granddaughter of Thomas Sheather

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth13 August 1899Lucy May Loiterton was born on Sunday, 13 August 1899 at Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG.1
She was the daughter of Charles Loiterton and Mary Ann Manning.
Marriage15 April 1922Lucy May was married to Herbert Roy Duffey, son of Charles Edward Duffey and Florence Eva Bell, on Saturday, 15 April 1922 at Wallendbeen, NSW, AustraliaG.2
Death9 March 1973Lucy May Loiterton died on Friday, 9 March 1973 at Cootamundra, NSWG, at age 73.2

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1922As of 15 April 1922, her married name was Duffey.

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
NoteLucy May Loiterton lived her early life at "Lincoln Dale", moving to Cootamundra after her marriage in 1922. In her later life she was regarded as quiet, retiring and independent. Her greatest loves were her home and garden.3

Family with

Herbert Roy Duffey b. 1901
Children
ChartsDescendant Chart - Charles Loiterton
Descendant Chart - Stephen Oxford
Descendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Last Edited12 Sep 1999

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Cootamundra; Year of registration: 1899; Registration Number: 29833.
  2. [S22] Ian Douglas Loiterton, A Loiterton History, page 62.
  3. [S22] Ian Douglas Loiterton, A Loiterton History, page 70.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Frederick Joseph Loiterton

M, #1098, b. 13 March 1902, d. 9 August 1961
FatherCharles Loiterton b. 9 Mar 1864, d. 5 Jul 1923
MotherMary Ann Manning b. 1867, d. 4 Nov 1940
Relationships1st cousin 2 times removed of Robert Mote
4th great-grandson of Charles Loiterton
7th great-grandson of Thomas Sheather

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth13 March 1902Frederick Joseph Loiterton was born on Thursday, 13 March 1902 at Wallendbeen, NSW, AustraliaG.1
He was the son of Charles Loiterton and Mary Ann Manning.
Marriage5 June 1929Frederick Joseph Loiterton gave the bride away at the wedding of Edwin Laurence Mayne and Ivy Ellen Loiterton on 5 June 1929 at St Clements Church, Wallendbeen, NSW, AustraliaG.
Marriage19 December 1942Frederick Joseph was married to Edith Cropper, daughter of Richard Cropper and Hannah Cropper, on Saturday, 19 December 1942 at Christ Church, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG.2
Marriage8 February 1951Frederick Joseph was married to Ellen Cropper, daughter of Richard Cropper and Hannah Cropper, on Thursday, 8 February 1951 at Christ Church, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG.
Death9 August 1961Frederick Joseph Loiterton died on Wednesday, 9 August 1961 at Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 59.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
NicknameFrederick Joseph Loiterton was often called Fred.

Military Service

EventDateDetails
Milit-Beg10 June 1942Frederick Joseph Loiterton began military service on 10 June 1942 at Wallendbeen, NSW, AustraliaG, and was discharged on 17 February 1944 while a Private in 18 Battalion Volunteer Defence Corps - Part Time Duty. His Army Service Number was N382130.3

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
the Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG12 January 1943Frederick Joseph Loiterton was mentioned in an article in the Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG, on Tuesday, 12 January 1943 as follows:

WEDDING

LOITERTON - CROPPER

Quietly married at Christ Church, Cootamundra, on the Saturday before Christmas, were Mr. Fred. Loiterton, of 'Springbrook,' Wallendbeen, and son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Charles Loiterton, and Miss Edith Cropper, only daughter of Mr. S. and the late Mrs. S. Cropper, of St. Eleen's, England. Mrs. I. Mayne, sister of the brldegroom, was bridesmaid, and Mr. I. Davies best man.4

the Cootamundra Daily Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG8 February 1951He was mentioned in an article in the Cootamundra Daily Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG, on Thursday, 8 February 1951 as follows:

MARRIAGE

LOITERTON - CROPPER.- On the 6th February, at Christ Church, Cootamundra, Frederick Joseph Loiterton, of 'Angeluka,' Yeo Yeo, to Ellen Cropper, late of Lancashire, England.4


Other Details

LabelDateDetails
NoteFrederick Joseph Loiterton was born in Wallendbeen and spent the early part of his life there. He appears to have been involved in farming activities also. In February 1927, Fred and his partner Rupert Bodell , both regarded as experts when it came to sheep crutching, were reported to have reached a tally of 12,000 to 15,000 - enough to make news in the town of Wallendbeen.

At one stage Fred owned a type of motorcycle called a Neracar. This rather strange mode of transport had a single cylinder 221cc motor and a car-like chassis. It was designed to combine car-like comfort with the versatility of two wheels and although it had excellent road holding and stability, it was never really a success. It was manufactured in 1923.

Fred didn't marry until he was 40 years old, and his wife Edith (nee Cropper) died eight years after at the age of only 30. Fred was later to marry Edith's sister Nell the year after she arrived in Australia from Lancashire. At the time of his first marriage, Fred was living at "Springbrook", Wallendbeen. He and Nell owned a farm at Yeo Yeo. They retired from farming in 1952 and came to live in Cootamundra.5

Family with

Edith Cropper b. 1920, d. 21 May 1950
Child
ChartsDescendant Chart - Charles Loiterton
Descendant Chart - Stephen Oxford
Descendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Last Edited20 Apr 2014

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Cootamundra; Year of registration: 1902; Registration Number: 11566.
  2. [S22] Ian Douglas Loiterton, A Loiterton History, page 62.
  3. [S342] WW II Roll, online http://www.ww2roll.gov.au
  4. [S999] Trove, online http://trove.nla.gov.au
  5. [S22] Ian Douglas Loiterton, A Loiterton History, page 71.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Kenneth John Loiterton

M, #1099, b. 22 June 1905, d. 28 November 1967
FatherCharles Loiterton b. 9 Mar 1864, d. 5 Jul 1923
MotherMary Ann Manning b. 1867, d. 4 Nov 1940
Relationships1st cousin 2 times removed of Robert Mote
4th great-grandson of Charles Loiterton
7th great-grandson of Thomas Sheather

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth22 June 1905Kenneth John Loiterton was born on Thursday, 22 June 1905 at Wallendbeen, NSW, AustraliaG; The World War 2 Nominal Roll has the year of birth as 1906 but the NSW BDM has 1905.1
He was the son of Charles Loiterton and Mary Ann Manning.
Marriage5 June 1929Kenneth John Loiterton was the best man at the wedding of Edwin Laurence Mayne and Ivy Ellen Loiterton on 5 June 1929 at St Clements Church, Wallendbeen, NSW, AustraliaG.
Marriage9 July 1938Kenneth John was married to Elsie Ellen Armour, daughter of Thomas Armour and Florence Emily Mills, on Saturday, 9 July 1938 at Scot's Church, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG.
Death28 November 1967Kenneth John Loiterton died on Tuesday, 28 November 1967 at Wallendbeen, NSWG, at age 62.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
NicknameKenneth John Loiterton was often called Ken.

Military Service

EventDateDetails
Milit-Beg10 June 1942Kenneth John Loiterton began military service on 10 June 1942 at Wallendbeen, NSW, AustraliaG, and was discharged on 25 September 1945 while a Private in number 18 Battalion Volunteer Defence Corps - Part Time Duty. His Army Service Number was N382131.2

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
The Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG11 July 1938Kenneth John Loiterton was mentioned in an article in The Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG, on Monday, 11 July 1938 as follows:

WEDDING

ARMOUR- LOITERTON

Friends of the bride, who were members of the Fellowship Association, beautifully decorated Scots Church on Saturday last for a very pretty wedding.

The contracting parties were Miss Elsie Ellen Armour, second youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Armour, of Quinn street, Cootamundra, and Mr. Kenneth John Loiterton, son of the late Mr. Charles Loiterton and Mrs. Lolterton, of Wallendbeen.

The bride entered the church on the arm of her brother, Mr. Norman Armour, who subsequently gave her away, and she looked charming in a frock of London blue wool sheer, with a hat, of summer weight felt to tone. She carried a bouquet of flame sweet peas, carnations, and Scotch heather.

The bride was attended by Miss A. J. Hoey, who looked very becoming in a frock of dusty pink wool sheer, with a hat of summer weight felt to tone. The bridesmaid carried a bouquet of coral sweet peas, carnations, and Scotch heather.

The bridegroom was attended by Mr. Keith W. Armour as best man, and the Rev. R. C. Russell officiated.

After the ceremony the reception was held at the Cosy Corner Cafe where the bride's mother received the guests. The Rev. R. C. Russell presided, and the usual toasts were honored.

The honeymoon is being spent on a motor tour, and the future home of Mr. and Mrs. Loiterton will be at Wallendbeen.3

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
NoteKenneth John Loiterton was born in Wallendbeen and spent the whole of his life there. After marrying in 1930, he and Elsie lived at "Te-Aro" in Wallendbeen. They had 2 sons and a daughter. He was involved with general farm work and together with his brothers Fred and William, made a sought after shearing trio. After Ken died, Elsie moved into Cootamundra and lived at 123 Temora Road which had been Ian Loiterton's own home for the seventeen years he lived in Cootamundra. Elsie was involved in CWA and Red Cross activities but most of her interests centred around her home and church.4
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - James Crossley
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Descendant Chart - Charles Loiterton
Descendant Chart - Stephen Oxford
Descendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Descendant Chart - George Best
Descendant Chart - Richard Tuckwell
Last Edited25 Mar 2014

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Cootamundra; Year of registration: 1905; Registration Number: 22373.
  2. [S342] WW II Roll, online http://www.ww2roll.gov.au
  3. [S999] Trove, online http://trove.nla.gov.au
  4. [S22] Ian Douglas Loiterton, A Loiterton History, page 71.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

William Thomas Loiterton

M, #1100, b. 28 August 1907, d. 8 June 1938
FatherCharles Loiterton b. 9 Mar 1864, d. 5 Jul 1923
MotherMary Ann Manning b. 1867, d. 4 Nov 1940
Relationships1st cousin 2 times removed of Robert Mote
4th great-grandson of Charles Loiterton
7th great-grandson of Thomas Sheather

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth28 August 1907William Thomas Loiterton was born on Wednesday, 28 August 1907 at Wallendbeen, NSW, AustraliaG.
He was the son of Charles Loiterton and Mary Ann Manning.
Marriage1926William Thomas was married to Oriel Dacey in 1926 at Wallendbeen, NSWG.1
Death8 June 1938William Thomas Loiterton died on Wednesday, 8 June 1938 at Wallendbeen, NSWG, at age 30.

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
the Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG9 June 1938William Thomas Loiterton was mentioned in an article in the Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG, on Thursday, 9 June 1938 as follows:

ELECTROCUTED

WILLIAM LOITERTON OF WALLENDBEEN

There was a tragic happening at Wallendbeen yesterday afternoon. William Lolterton, aged. 30, a married man with a family of four, was cleaning out the gutters of the roof of the cottage occupied by his aged mother, the widow of the late Charles Loiterton, of Wallendbeen, when he slipped. To save himself from falling off the roof he grasped the electric wires leading into the home from the Burrinjuck service, got caught with the current, and could not get free fom the wire. His screams for assistance attracted the attention of the golfers on the course alongside. It was during the afternoon tea in connection with the season's official opening. The men ran over to assist. Others were also soon on the scene. One man, Mr. Cecil Connors, cut the wires with an axe to shut off the current from the unfortunate victim, who was still alive.

The ambulance and a doctor were summoned from Cootamundra, and the electric substation at Cootamundra was phoned. The ambulance with the doctor aboard, did the 12 miles in 12 minutes; and Messrs. Slater and Lucas ??f from the sub-station, were there in ??? minutes.

Meanwhile Messrs. Mormon and Connors, of Wallendbeen, who had had ambulance training, took charge of the case, and gave directions to the willing helpers. Using the ladder by which Mr. Loiterton had gone up to the roof, they got him down, and laid him out. He was unconscious, but still breathing, although the current had passed through his body for some minutes; and they worked to restore animation until the arrival of Ambulance Superintendent Moorhouse and the doctor. The latter continued their efforts, but in vain, until 10 minutes to 7, and the body was then brought to the Cootamundra District Hospital.

The accident had happened at about 4.45.

Deceased was born at Cootamundra. His father at time was farming. A member of a very esteemed family, descendants of the district pioneers, he followed shearing, and his brothers Fred and Ken made a clever trio in demand at the woolsheds around. All the brothers are handy men on the farm and in other spheres. For the last six months William had been renovating the home of Mr. Dixon, of "Bramshott," Wallendbeen, and, having a few days off from there, he was doing odd things for his mother, aged 71.

Mother and son had separate homes adjoining, but facing the two side streets off the main road which runs out from Wallendbeen towards Murrumburrah. To the veteran the fatality is a dreadful shock, as to all the other relatives and to Wallendbeen and district.

Deceased married Miss Oriel Dacey, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Dacey of Wallendbeen, who are also links with the earliest settlers about there; and there are three daughters and a son. The latt??????????? old and eldest girl is 12.

Brothers of the deceased are Steve (Cootamundra), ???????? Ken and Sid (Wallendbeen), Jim (Burrinjuck); sisters, May (Mrs. Roy Duffy, Cootamundra), Maude (Mrs. Len Troy, Lake Cargelligo), Emma (Mrs. George Ceeney, Wallendbeen), Eliza (Mrs. Geo. Adams, Taralga, Vic. and Ivy (Mrs. Geo. Mayne, Wallendbeen).

The Cootamundra Coroner (Mr. J. T. Kenehan), after formalities this morning, fixed the inquest for next Tuesday.

The interment took place in the Anglican cemetery at Wallendbeen this afternoon, following a service in the church.2

the Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG16 August 1939He was mentioned in an article in the Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG, on Wednesday, 16 August 1939 as follows:

WORKERS' COMPENSATION COMMISSION

(YESTERDAY.) Before his Honor, Judge Moffatt.

Loiterton .v. Loiterton

In the matter of determination between Oriel Gwendoline Cecelia Mary Loiterton and Mary Anne Loiterton.

The claim was for £900 compensation, arising out of the death, by electrocution, of William Loiterton, husband of the applicant, and son of the respondent. Mr. Levine, of Sydney instructed by Mr. Gilbert), appeared for the applicant, and Mr. Kinsey (of Kinsey and Callan, Cootamundra), appeared for the respondent.

At the conclusion of our report in yesterday's issue the applicant was still in the witness box. The evidence continued:
His Honor: 'What did you call her?
Witness: 'Mother.' I just asked for Bill's wages. His mother said that no arrangements for Bill to work there had been made. I told her that she told my husband that she was going to pay him 12/- a day. I could not get any satisfaction from her. Her at titude all through has been that she made no arrangements to employ and pay my husband.
His Honor: It is a pity some settlement could not be arranged.
Mr. Kinsey: We have no suggestions in that regard.
Witness: My husband told me my mother always paid him, even for chopping the wood. My husband was very fond of his mother, but he even charged her for that. Sometimes he would only cut a few sticks.
His Honor: He would not charge for that, surely?
Witness: Yes.
By Mr. Kinsey: He was paid for everything he did, whether the job lasted five minutes or ten days. At the time of the accident, Mrs. Loiterton was not carrying on any trade or business. My mother and I went to see Mr. Maxwell, and went into the whole matter. It was discussed at length. He gave me advice. As my solicitor, he wrote Mrs Loiterton. The letter asked if Mrs. Loiterton was prepared to give me any material as sistance, towards the maintenance of my children. There was no mention of a claim.
His Honor: . It could have been just a friendly appeal.
Witness: Mr. Maxwell told me that he did get a reply to his letter.
By Mr. Kinsey: I did not see the copy of the letter you produce. It was after I saw Mr. Maxwell that I wrote to the Conciliation and Information Bureau of the Workers' Compensation Commission. On my behalf, they wrote to Mrs. Loiterton, and I heard from that department the reply that was made. Ultimately, I got Mr. Gilbert to act for me, and it was in April, 1939, that I instituted proceedings through Mr. Gilbert. I did not ask Mr. Maxwell to do anything, but make arrangements with the Commission, who told me they could not get enough evidence. I first saw Mr. Gilbert about December. That would be about three months after I heard from the Commission. I do not know the reason for the delay from December to April in the lodging of a claim. I did not write to Mr. Gilbert, asking the reasons for the delay. I was not present at Mrs. Loiterton's place when there was some talk of painting the house. I do not know anything about my husband arranging to return to Mr. Dixon's to do some crutching. The only time I have been to I see my mother-in-law since my, husband died was when I went to ask for my husband's wages.
His Honor: There would be naturally bad feeling from the time Mrs. Loiterton received the solicitor's letter. At this stage the court was adjourned until 2 o'clock.

Witness, continuing under cross- examination: I do not want to correct my statement that my husband had painted the house two years before the accident.
Mr. Levine said that he admitted that Mr. Kinsey had replied to Mr. Maxwell, and that the latter had received the letter.
Witness continued: I did get a let- ter from Mr. Maxwell, saying that he did not receive a reply to his letter to the respondent's solicitors. I did not receive a letter from Mr. Maxwell stating that Mrs. Loiterton denied liability, or that, owing to her position, could not give any financial assistance at the time being, and any that she might give later would be purely voluntary. Mr. Maxwell did not tell me that he had heard that my husband was not employed by Mrs. Loiterton. Long before he left Mr. Dixon's, he promise his mother to do the painting work.
To Mr. Levine: After my husband's death my mother-in-law did not call to see me. I did not receive any messages of sympathy from her. His shearing work did not take up the whole of the year. For the rest of the year he was an odd-job man. As compared with the rest of the family, my husband's financial position was much worse than the rest of the family. At the time of his death we were in debt. I say again that my husband was paid for every bit of work my husband did for his mother.

Elsie May Dacey, mother of the applicant, deposed: I live near respondent's home, and pass it every morning on the way for my mail. The day after the funeral I called at Mrs. Loiterton's back door with my daughter, to ask for deceased's tools. Mrs. Loiterton, sen., said that the tools were up at the shed, and Mr. Fred. Loiterton would give them to my daughter.
By Mr. Kinsey: I have never seen any other members of the family doing anything about the place except cutting wood. I would say they were good workers. Deceased painted the house twice before his death. I did not go to the house, with my daughter, leaving her at the gate. I did not ask Mrs. Loiterton for 2/6. I was collectlng for supper for a dance, and Mrs. Loiterton's daughter, Mrs. Wayne, gave me 2/6, outside the house, towards the supper. I went with my daughter to see Mr. Maxwell, and told him all the facts I knew about the case. I think my daughter did her own correspondence with the Commission.
Applicant recalled: During the last period when my husband was working for my mother, he would leave for work at 7 o'clock each morning. He returned at 12.30 for lunch, staying for about half an hour. He would return about 5 o'clock each evening.
By Mr. Kinsey: Did you watch your husband working all the time.
Witness: No, how could I? This concluded the case for the applicant.
Mr. Kinsey: I submit there is no case to answer.
His Honor: I never non-suit in these cases.

Respondent deposed: I am a widow, residing in Gray street, Wallendbeen, and the mother of William Thomas Loiterton, who was killed at my home on June 8, 1938. My son came to see me every time he got a chance. Two other single boys lived at the house with me. They did odd jobs around the house for me. They were often away. They would cut the hedges, cut the wood, do the gardening, etc. My son Sid often came to see me. He did some odd painting for me. None of the other boys ever did a job as big as painting the house. It would take a week to paint the house. One Sunday morning my son said he would, come and paint the house in his spare time. He said he was waiting for Mr. Dixon to ring him to go back and crutch some sheep. He said he would do some work at my place, so he could answer my 'phone when Mr. Dixon rang. He walked round the house with me, and pointed out things that wanted doing. He said that if I got the paints ready he would come in and do the work in his spare time. I did not pay him for any of his work. He was a good worker, and he was always wanting to do something for me. My son first mentioned the painting work. He said, "Mum, if you get the paint, I will do the house in my spare time. I gave no instructions to my son about how he would do the work, or when he was to start. It would be about a week after the talk that he came to the house, and started working on the fence and the hedge. I was not prepared to spend money on having the house painted. He did not ask for any payment during the job. My boys would not have taken any payment if I had offered it to them. I did not pay him for any of the odd jobs he did from time to time. He never, asked for any payment. Mrs. Dacey came to my back door and Mrs Will Loiterton stopped up at the back gate. This was the day after the funeral. I said that I had never agreed to pay any wages to my son. It would be six or seven years before my son's death that the house was painted previously. My daughter- in-law did not mention any rate of wages to me. Nothing, like that was ever said.
By Mr. Levine: My son always seemed to have enough money to carry on with when he was not working. He would be as well off as my other sons. His widow's position now is not too bad. The four children are looked after allright. I have not been to see my daughter-in-law since the accident. I used to go and see her before the accident. I did not say, to my son,'"I like the color of Mr. Dixon's place. Will your paint my house the same?'" My daughter, Mrs Wayne, works at the store. I cannot remember any trouble about getting the paint. I did not know that my son Ken had deceased insured. Deceased worked for him at harvesting time. I did not know about Sid's wife calling to, see Mrs. Loiterton. I know nothing about the family having a conference, or Mrs. Sid Loiterton telling deceased's wife to keep quiet about the accident. I cannot remember when I first saw my solicitor. I do not remember any suggestion of making a claim for insurance through my son Ken. I cannot remember getting a letter from Mr. Maxwell. I have never seen the compensation claim form produced. I do not know how much my daughter-in-law is claiming in this court today. I do not read much. I am nearly 73 years of age. Mrs. Mayne does all my mail. I have never employed anyone in my life. Mrs. Wayne has not employed anyone for me. I did not know that my son was going to erect a fence.
To Mr. Kinsey: In connection with this legal business now before the court, I have left the handling of the matter to the members of my family.
Mrs. Ivy Mayne gave corroborative evidence.
By Mr. Levine: To my knowledge my mother did not pay anyone for any work around the place. Mr. Dyde, a carrier, was paid for carting some posts. My brothers have a small truck, but they were away working at that time. William started work on the Friday, and was electrocuted on the Wednesday. I was there all the time when my brother William had a conversation with my mother. I did not discuss this case at the lunch hour. When I received the first letter from Mr. Maxwell I took the letter to Mr. Kinsey. Those at home discussed the matter. I do not know anything about Ken insuring William, or Mrs. Sid going to see Mrs. Loiterton. There was no attempt to keep the accident quiet. The matter of compensation was not discussed. There was a mis take in the paint for the house. Wil liam had been talking about the color he had used on Mr. Dixon's house. When I ordered the paint I made a mistake with the color card, and got a color which was a shade darker. The house did need painting. William was waiting to go back to Mr. Dixon's, and he said he had told Mr. Dixon to ring our home. Until a fortnight before the accident I was on friendly terms with the applicant. I know her four children very well. I have never heard a fee of 12/- a day mentioned.
Sidney Loiterton deposed: Just a little time before his death, deceased (my brother) came to me to borrow a wedge. He said he was going to do a little job for his mother while he was waiting to go back to Mr. Dixton's.
By Mr. Levine: Bill worked with me for Ken. I would be insured with Ken. I could not say if my wife went to see Bill's wife on the night of his death. I did not hear any mention of insurance that Ken had taken out. I am not friendly, with the widow. I finished the painting after Bill's death. It took me two or three weeks to finish the job.
By Mr. Kinsey: I was not working for that time continuously. I did the work in my slack time.
To his Honor: Going straight at it, I could have done, the work in 6 or 8 days.

This concluded the case for the respondent.

After summing up his Honor said he did not think it was a case in which he could make an award. It was unfortunate that the widow had been left with four children. It probably would not be too late for a settlement. All the people in the case seemed to be decent people. It was his opinion that deceased was doing the work voluntarily. For the sake of the children, his Honor suggested that the people concerned should come together.

His Honor then formally found in favor of the respondent. No award was made as to costs.2

the Cootamundra Daily Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG3 January 1947He was mentioned in the newspaper article about Sydney Loiterton on 3 January 1947 in the Cootamundra Daily Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG;

OBITUARY

MR. SID. LOITERTON, of Wallendbeen

The death occurred, at the home of his brother Fred, on Tuesday evening, of Mr. Sidney Loiterton, 58, well known Wallendbeen identity.

Deceased had been assisting his brother Mr Fred Loiterton, with the harvesting, and collapsed after work on Tuesday afternoon.

The Cootamundra Ambulance was called out, and brought him to the District Hospital, where he failed to rally.

The late Mr. Loiterton's wife predeceased him on January 3, 1943. There were no children. She was Annie May.

The widow was formerly Annie May Coddington, of Wallendbeen.

Surviving brothers and sisters are: Steve, Don, Fred, and Ken, Mrs. G. Ceeney, Mrs. Adams (Vic), Mrs. Troy (Woollongong), Mrs. Roy Duffey, and Mrs. Ivor Davies.

The remains were laid to rest in the Church of England portion of the Murrumburrah cemetery yesterday, at 11 a.m.

Deceased was the eldest son of the late Charles Loiterton, Wallendbeen.

A brother, Jim, died last July, and another brother, George, was electrocuted at Wallendbeen.2

the Cootamundra Daily Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG9 June 1947William Thomas Loiterton was mentioned in an article in the Cootamundra Daily Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, AustraliaG, on Monday, 9 June 1947 as follows:

IN MEMORIAM

LOITERTON.- In loving memory of William Thomas Loiterton, who passed away on 8th June, 1938.

Always sadly missed.
-By his loving wife and family.2


Other Details

LabelDateDetails
Num ChildWilliam Thomas Loiterton and Oriel Dacey had four children.
NoteWilliam Thomas Loiterton was a shearer and general farm hand and for the six months prior to his death had been renovating the house of Mr. Dixon of "Bramshott" near Wallendbeen. He had been doing some odd jobs for his mother during a few days he had taken off from working on the house.

William lived in a house near his mother's. He and his wife Oriel had 4 children at the time of the accident.3
ChartsDescendant Chart - Charles Loiterton
Descendant Chart - Stephen Oxford
Descendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Last Edited20 Apr 2014

Citations

  1. [S22] Ian Douglas Loiterton, A Loiterton History, page 62.
  2. [S999] Trove, online http://trove.nla.gov.au
  3. [S22] Ian Douglas Loiterton, A Loiterton History, page 71.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.