Elizabeth Ellen Crossley

F, #881, b. 19 May 1863, d. 1 April 1950
FatherJeremiah Crossley b. 16 Aug 1811, d. 1 Aug 1884
MotherSarah James b. 11 Aug 1824, d. 18 Feb 1909
RelationshipsGreat-grandaunt of Robert Mote
Great-granddaughter of James Thomas John Bean
Granddaughter of James Crossley

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth19 May 1863Elizabeth Ellen Crossley was born on Tuesday, 19 May 1863 at Wargeila, near Yass, NSW, AustraliaG.1
She was the daughter of Jeremiah Crossley and Sarah James.
Marriage25 June 1879Elizabeth Ellen was married to William Mills, son of William Mills and Elizabeth Tuckwell, on Wednesday, 25 June 1879 at near Yass, NSWG. The Minister was W H H Yarrington and the witnesses were James Crossley and William Eager.2,3
Death1 April 1950Elizabeth Ellen Crossley died on Saturday, 1 April 1950 at Mount Elliott, Wargeila, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 86.
Burialafter 1 April 1950She was buried after 1 April 1950 at Church of England cemetery, Yass, NSW, AustraliaG; The inscription on the headstone reads - William MILLS, died 10 March 1936 aged 79 years; also Elizabeth E MILLS, died 1 April 1950 aged 86 years.4

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1879As of 25 June 1879, her married name was Mills.2

Family with

William Mills b. 1 Oct 1856, d. 10 Mar 1936
Children
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - James Crossley
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Descendant Chart - George Best
Descendant Chart - Richard Tuckwell
Last Edited21 Jun 2001

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Yass
    Registration Year: 1863
    Registration Number: 15282.
  2. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Yass
    Registration Year: 1879
    Registration Number: 5286.
  3. [S249] Letter, Patrick Martin McCormack to Robert Mote, June, 2001.
  4. [S10] Pam Ray, Yass Cemetery, Page: 17
    Number: 129.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Emma Amelia Crossley

F, #882, b. 13 May 1867, d. 1868
FatherJeremiah Crossley b. 16 Aug 1811, d. 1 Aug 1884
MotherSarah James b. 11 Aug 1824, d. 18 Feb 1909
RelationshipsGreat-grandaunt of Robert Mote
Great-granddaughter of James Thomas John Bean
Granddaughter of James Crossley

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth13 May 1867Emma Amelia Crossley was born on Monday, 13 May 1867 at Wargeila, near Yass, NSW, AustraliaG.
She was the daughter of Jeremiah Crossley and Sarah James.
Death1868Emma Amelia Crossley died in 1868 at Yass, NSW, AustraliaG.1
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - James Crossley
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Last Edited12 Sep 1999

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Yass
    Registration Year: 1868
    Registration Number: 7180.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Ada Eliza Rosetta Crossley

F, #883, b. 15 April 1869, d. 15 November 1951
Ada Eliza Rosetta McGregor (née Crossley)
FatherJeremiah Crossley b. 16 Aug 1811, d. 1 Aug 1884
MotherSarah James b. 11 Aug 1824, d. 18 Feb 1909
RelationshipsGreat-grandaunt of Robert Mote
Great-granddaughter of James Thomas John Bean
Granddaughter of James Crossley

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth15 April 1869Ada Eliza Rosetta Crossley was born on Thursday, 15 April 1869 at Wargeila, near Yass, NSW, AustraliaG.1
She was the daughter of Jeremiah Crossley and Sarah James.
Marriage29 June 1887Ada Eliza Rosetta was married to Alexander McGregor, son of James McGregor and Elizabeth McIntosh, on Wednesday, 29 June 1887 at near Yass, NSWG.2
Death15 November 1951Ada Eliza Rosetta Crossley died on Thursday, 15 November 1951 at Rosebank, Wargeila, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 82.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1887As of 29 June 1887, her married name was McGregor.

Family with

Alexander McGregor b. 1861, d. 23 Sep 1915
Children
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - James Crossley
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Last Edited6 Dec 2004

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Yass; Registration Year: 1869; Registration Number: 20071.
  2. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Yass
    Registration Year: 1887
    Registration Number: 7495.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

William Shelley

M, #884, b. 29 May 1774, d. 6 July 1815
FatherJohn Shelley
MotherElizabeth Unknown

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth29 May 1774William Shelley was born on Sunday, 29 May 1774 at Hanley, Staffordshire, EnglandG.
He was the son of John Shelley and Elizabeth Unknown.
Baptism16 June 1775William Shelley was baptized on Friday, 16 June 1775 at Leek Parish Church, Staffordshire, EnglandG.1
Marriage7 October 1801William was married to Elizabeth Bean, daughter of James Thomas John Bean and Elizabeth Taylor, on Wednesday, 7 October 1801 at St John's Church of England, Parramatta, NSW, AustraliaG.2
Marriage13 June 1814William Shelley witnessed the marriage of William Bean and Elizabeth Bradley on 13 June 1814 at Parramatta, NSWG; One of the witnesses was Esther Harley, the daughter of Thomas Bradley whose family accompanied the Beans to Sydney on the Buffalo.
Death6 July 1815William Shelley died on Thursday, 6 July 1815 at Parramatta, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 41.3
BurialHe was buried at Parramatta, NSWG.

Voyages

DateDetails
13 February 1800William Shelley arrived on 13 February 1800 in Port Jackson, NSW, AustraliaG, aboard the sailing ship Duff/Betsey.1

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
ArticleAustralian Dictionary of Biography entry for:
SHELLEY (SHELLY) WILLIAM (1774-1815), missionary and trader, was born on 29 May 1774 at Hanley, Staffordshire, England, where his family had long been associated with the local potteries He was apprenticed to a cabinet maker at Leek, joined the Congregational Church in 1794 and volunteered as an artisan missionary to the (London) Missionary Society He was one of the party which sailed in the Duff in 1796 with Rev J F Cover [q. v.] and was a member of the original mission to Tonga. When the Tongans killed three missionaries in 1799 he escaped and next year went to Sydney in the Betsy, in company with the Anna Josepha, navigated by Rev John Harris [q. v.] Shelley took up his residence with Rowland Hassall [q. v.] at Parramatta, commenced his own trade, and helped in the religious work of the settlement

In March 1801 he left for England in the Royal Admiral in the hope of reopening the Tongan mission, but after arriving at Tahiti decided to join the mission there He returned to Sydney to marry Elizabeth Bean, daughter of a free settler, which he did on 7 October and returned to Tahiti next month While in the colony he impressed Samuel Marsden [q. v.] with the dangers to the mission of establishing a government colony at Tahiti and proposed that the pork trade should be conducted by the Missionary Society Shelley was deeply impressed with the need of a ship to support the mission by trade and, being dissatisfied with the organization of the mission, determined to work independently He returned to Sydney in the Lucy in April 1806, taking with him about forty gallons of rum made secretly at the mission still to use for barter Soon he entered into a commercial arrangement with John Macarthur and Garnham Blaxcell [q. v.] and engaged as supercargo in the Elizabeth, which had been bought to open trade in sandalwood with Fiji. However, Shelley sailed to Tahiti in the Harrington in January 1807 There he built the Halcyon, which he sent to Sydney with a cargo of pork, and in May he joined the Elizabeth, returning to Sydney in June and again in November, estimating that his own share was upwards of 1,000-pounds Convinced that a trading ship was essential if the mission was to prosper, and with plans to reopen the Tongan mission, he sailed for London in the Albion in November 1808, but he could not convince the directors that he was right, even though he had the help of Marsden, who was then in England

Early in 1810 Shelley returned to New South Wales and next year opened a general store in York Street, Sydney In August 1812 he was granted 400 acres at Cabramatta and a town lease at Cockle Bay, but early in 1813 he closed his business and sailed from Sydney in May as master of the Queen Charlotte. In the Tuamotus the ship was seized by Raiatean pearl divers, three men were murdered and Shelley narrowly escaped with his life He recovered the ship at Tahiti and returned to Sydney in February 1814 with a large cargo of shells and 'as large a quantity of pearls as has ever yet been procured by a single vessel' It was probably during this voyage that Shelley left a European artisan at Tongatapu preparatory to reopening the mission there

Resettling at Parramatta, Shelley conducted Congregational services in his house and commenced work among the Aboriginals He attempted to learn the language, took some children into his own family and addressed Governor Macquarie on 'the practicability of civilizing them. He was invited to draw up plans and in December was appointed superintendent and principal instructor of the Native Institution at Parramatta, the first of its kind in the colony However, after establishing the school, he died on 6 July 1815.

According to Marsden, with whom he was on intimate terms, Shelley was a man 'of very comprehensive mind.' Macarthur described him as 'respectable and intelligent' Captain House found him an over 'busy' person, whilst to W. P. Crook [q. v.], he was 'bustling and active', with his heart set on this world' Macquarie described him as well qualified and a 'Moral, Well Meaning Man' Mrs Shelley continued the work of the institution, but despite Macquarie's interest it met with little success and was closed in 1826. Shelley's plans to reopen the Tongan mission were also abandoned, but later Mrs Shelley persuaded Rev Walter Lawry [q. v.] to reopen it She died on 20 September 1878. Two of their sons, William (1803-1845) and George (1812-1852), were among the pioneers of the Tumut district, taking their herds beyond the Nineteen Counties in 1829.

Occupation1800William Shelley was a missionary and trader in 1800.
ReligionHe and Elizabeth Bean were Church of England.

Family with

Elizabeth Bean b. 31 Dec 1782, d. 20 Sep 1878
Children
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - John Shelley
Last Edited7 Jul 2006

Citations

  1. [S49] Lynn Smith, "Thomas Beane", Record #4.
  2. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Denomination: Church of England; Parish: Parramatta, St John's; Registration Year: 1801;Volume Reference: V1801502 3A.
  3. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Parramatta, Registration Year: 1815, Registration Number: V18153432 2B.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Thomas Dunn

M, #885, b. 1776, d. 6 April 1832

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1776Thomas Dunn was born in 1776 at EnglandG; or possibly Ireland.
Marriage10 October 1804Thomas was married to Rose Bean, daughter of James Thomas John Bean and Elizabeth Taylor, on Wednesday, 10 October 1804 at St John's Church of England, Parramatta, NSW, AustraliaG.1
Death6 April 1832Thomas Dunn died on Friday, 6 April 1832 at Castlereagh Street, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaG.2
BurialApril 1832He was buried in April 1832 at St James, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaG.3

Criminal Record

DatePlaceDetails
10 October 1796the Old Bailey, London, EnglandGThomas Dunn was sentenced at the Old Bailey.
OLD BAILEY SESSION PAPERS - Dec 8 1780-Nov 1 1834 (MFLM 345.4207)

Trial date: 10th October 1796

622. THOMAS DUNN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of September, thirteen pieces of brown paper, value 1d. fourteen hundred and fifty two halfpence value 3 pound and 6d. and two hundred and fifteen farthings, value 4s6d. the property of Richard Pearce.

EUSEBIUS SWEET sworn
The prosecutor is a brewer, in King street, Westminster, the prisoner was his servant, I am clerk to him; I have been in the habit if missing money for some time; on the 18th of September, I missed money from a place we call the iron-house, where we lock up our books for safety from fire, and there we frequently put a great quantity of copper money: we got a search warrant, and the Magistrates advised us to mark the papers; I accordingly told out 12 pound worth of halfpence, in five shilling papers; I put twenty four of these papers into the iron-house marked; on Wednesday the 20th of September, I missed seventeen out of the twenty four; I replaced that seventeen, with seventeen more marked; on Saturday morning the 24th September, all was safe in the iron house; at eight o'clock in the morning, when I went to breakfast, and returned at nine, I had left the keys of the iron-house hanging up in the counting-house, where they always hung; a few minutes after that, Mr Green saw him lurking about, and fancied he had stole some beer, and heard some keys fall: when I came to look into the iron-house, I found some papers of which these are the checks, (producing them); we had him then in possession, and applied for a search warrant to the Police-Office, then he was brought up, and confessed it.

THOMAS GREEN sworn
I am a brewer; upon entering the tun-room, I heard a person in the adjoining store-house, moving about, and I found Dunn in a dark part of the store-house, I enquired his business, and he told me, that he was assisting the tun-men, placing the barrels; there were no barrels for him to place, as the business was already done; I looked about and found these keys, which I had heard him, upon entering the store-house, let fall; I consequently took them, and bringing them to the light, I found they were the keys of the lobby and iron-house; I took them to the counting house to Mr Sweet, and told him I had discovered the means by which his money went, and immediately went into the yard and called the prisoner, charged him with having taken the keys, and insisted upon his appearing before Mr Pearce to clear the matter, and I took him to the counting-house to Mr Pearce, where I left him.

Cross examined by Mr Ally. Q. You heard the keys fall?
A.     Yes
Q.     They did not make any great noise, but such as if a man was going along and these keys were lying on the ground, as if he kicked against them?
A.     They were not upon the ground; they fell into a utensil about four feet from the ground, and six inches deep.
Q.     Was it after you went in that you heard it?
A.     As I entered the store-house.

     
PATRICK M'NEAL sworn
     I was in the counting-house with the younger Mr Pearce, when he acknowledged it.
Q. Was anything paid to induce him to confess it?
A. Mr Pearce told him, after the constable came, he could not do anything in it, but it would be better for him to confess it before he came; and I saw him pull out of his breeches pocket a five shilling paper of halfpence, ( produces it.)
SWEET. This is one of the papers that I had marked: the piece fits in, and the number too; I swear this is one of the papers I marked.
Q. You pay your workmen some halfpence and some silver?
A. Yes, according as their pay is; I used to pay them about seven shillings in halfpence.
Q. It is no great wonder therefore that any man should have five shillings or six shillings worth of halfpence?
A. No; but it was odd he should have marked by me for the purpose of detection.

WILLIAM ATWOOD sworn
I belong to Queen square, Westminster: On the 24th of September I was sent for to apprehend this man, and in the counting-house he owned to me he had concealed twelve papers in the coal-hole; I went there and found these papers of halfpence in a coal-hole under a cloth.
Q. By his direction?
A. Yes; he went with me and showed me where they were, (produces twelve five shilling papers)
SWEET: These are ours also; he had worked with us fourteen or fifteen months.
Mr ALLY: You had, I believe, a good character with the prisoner?
A.     I don't recollect that we had any character.
Q.     But he was raised from the good opinion you had of him?
A.     I never suspected him of it.

(The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY (Aged 20)

Transported for seven years.

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.4     

He was a carpenter who had been tried at Newgate and sent to the Lafortuna and Ceres hulks. On 24 November 1798 he was transferred to the Hillsborough.

Voyages

DateDetails
23 December 1798Thomas Dunn was a convict aboard The Ship Hillsborough which left at Portland Roads, EnglandG, on Sunday, 23 December 1798 and arrived in Sydney, NSW on 26 July 1799. The Master was William Hingston.

Three hundred convicts were on board the ship when it left England and the long trip to Australia was dreadful. Governor Hunter described it to the Under Secretary as follows - "Figure to yourself a ship having out of three hundred people embark'd in England, and having stopped for their refreshment several weeks at the Cape of Good Hope, yet hav'g upon her voyage buried of the above number ninety-five, and four since landing; those who still survive are in the most sickly and wretched state, put on board the ship in England with the cloaths only in which they stood, consequently arriv'd here naked, where cloathing is not to be found.

According to the description of the voyage by William Noah, a convict died nearly every day. Discontent was rife among the convicts who meted out a horrible punishment to one called Wiltshire, whose nick name was "Muckbolt", for telling the sailors who among the convicts had removed their irons and how they were plotting to seize the ship. The convicts dealt summarily with Muckbolt by giving him twelve dozen lashes, gagged him and put needles in his tongue so he couldn't put it into his mouth. Some wanted to cut off his tongue for having betrayed them. The Captain, hearing of this then inflicted most severe punishment on all the guilty convicts. They were also deprived of provisions and water. The voyage was so uncomfortable that "indeed Death would have been a welcome friend".

The Hillsborough was a large and roomy ship, and, according to the Transport Commissioners, had been fitted out on an improved plan; the bars on the prison being built far apart to admit the air more freely. She embarked 152 prisoners at Gravesend, and when she arrived at the Motherbank on November 17th 1798, her Master, William Hingston, reported to the Transport Board's agent at Portsmouth, Captain Charles Patton, that one convict died and several others were sick. Sir John Fitzpatrick, who had inspected the ship in the Thames, ordered the sick to be transferred to a hospital ship, and urged most strongly that the ship's complement of convicts should not be made up from the prisoners in the Langstone Harbour hulks, aboard which the gaol fever, or typhoid, had raged in a malignant form for some time. His advice was disregarded, as were his further protests after the Langstone convicts had been embarked. He insisted, however, that five prisoners, all in an advanced stage of the disease, should be disembarked, and all five died within a few days.

The Hillsborough sailed in a convoy from Portland Roads on 23rd December 1798, and at once ran into heavy weather. As her decks required caulking, and the sea was breaking over her continuously, the convicts' quarters were deluged and their bedding soaked. When the weather moderated a few days later, a youthful informer told the Captain that many of the convicts were out of their irons and intended to murder the officers. Those found out of their irons were flogged, receiving from one to six dozen lashes each, and were shackled and handcuffed, some with iron collars round their neck. The allowance of rations and water was also reduced, so that for several days the prisoners were half starved.

In all the circumstances it is not surprising that the disease carried aboard by the Langstone convicts spread rapidly, and from the beginning of January deaths became alarmingly frequent. Yet the convicts were kept closely confined and double-ironed, were short of water, and were half starved. It was, one would think, wrote William Noah, a convict who left a moving account of the prisoners sufferings in his diary of the voyage, enough to soften the heart of the most inhuman being to see us ironed, handcuffed and shackled in a dark, nasty dismal deck, without the least wholesome air, but all this did not penetrate the breasts of our inhuman Captain, and I can assure you that the Doctor was kept at such a distance, and so strict was he look after, that I have known him sit up till opportunity would suite to steal a little water to quench the thirst of those who were bad, he being on a very small allowance for them.

According to Noah, thirty convicts had died when the Hillsborough anchored in Table Bay on April 13th 1799. There were then about 100 prisoners very ill, and although fresh provisions were served, deaths became so frequent that the authorities were alarmed, and the ship was ordered to move to False Bay. Noah alleges that to avoid further interrogation, the Master buried some of the convicts at the Harbour Entrance, but within a few days the bodies were washed ashore. On may 5, by which time at least 28 convicts had died since the Ship's arrival at Table Bay, the Surgeon, JJW Kunst, returned from Capetown with an order permitting the sick to be landed. Why this step was so long delayed is incomprehensible but it was useless because no provision was made for the proper accommodation of the patients ashore. When 146 were landed on May 6 they found that their miserable hospital had previously been a stable and was without a fireplace, windows and lavatory accommodation, and next morning 56 of the prisoners were returned to the ship. When the Hillsborough sailed on May 29 at least 50 of the convicts had been buried at the Cape.

Governor Hunter, when the Hillsborough reached Sydney, described the survivors as the most wretched and miserable convicts I have ever beheld, in the most sickly and wretched state. almost every prisoner required hospital treatment. The frightful mortality was due primarily to the embarkation of the Langstone prisoners, but also partly to the harsh treatment of the convicts on the voyage. Noah's diary proves that they were kept double-ironed, and when on deck were chained together, so that they could not walk about at all, but had to stand up or lie down on the deck. They were inadequately fed, and, especially between the Cape and Port Jackson, the weather was so stormy that the prison was continuously damp and the convicts bedding seldom dry.

Census Entries

Census DatePlaceDetails
1828Cumberland Street, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaGThomas Dunn and Rose Bean appeared on the census of 1828 at Cumberland Street, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaG. Also in the household were Richard Dunn and Rose Maria Ellen Dunn; Thomas is listed as owning one horse.5

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
OccupationDecember 1810Thomas Dunn was appointed a Constable in December 1810 at Sydney, NSW, AustraliaG.
ArticleJune 1814In June 1814 Thomas received 80 acres in Sydney on the recommendation of Mr Cowper.
Occupation1817He was appointed District Constable in 1817.
Occupation19 October 1820He was appointed Chief Constable on 19 October 1820.
ArticleNovember 1825In November 1825 Thomas was granted an additional 300 acres in Sydney by Sir Thomas Brisbane.

Family with

Rose Bean b. 22 Jan 1786, d. 7 Nov 1831
Children
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Last Edited6 Feb 2014

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Denomination: Church of England; Parish: Parramatta, St John's; Registration Year: 1804;Volume Reference: V1804604 3A.
  2. [S139] Perry McIntyre & Adele Cathro, Thomas Dunn's Descendants, page: 63.
  3. [S49] Lynn Smith, "Thomas Beane", Record #5.
  4. [S95] Barbara Butler, "B Butler," e-mail to Robert Mote, 1 December 1999.
  5. [S4] M R Sainty and K A Johnson, NSW 1828 Census, 132.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Susan Hannah Muldoon1

F, #886, b. 1846
FatherThomas Muldoon
MotherSusan Browne

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1846Susan Hannah Muldoon was born in 1846 at Monaro District, NSW, AustraliaG.
She was the daughter of Thomas Muldoon and Susan Browne.
Marriage1862Susan Hannah was married to Charles Bean, son of James Thomas John Bean Jnr. and Esther Short, in 1862 at Gunning, NSW, AustraliaG.2

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1862As of 1862, her married name was Bean.2
Name VariationSusan Hannah Muldoon was also known as Susannah as shown on the NSW BDM for her daughter Lucy's birth.

Family with

Charles Bean b. 1819, d. 20 Jan 1870
Children
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

Citations

  1. [S49] Lynn Smith, "Thomas Beane", record #21.
  2. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Marriage Registration: Yass, Registration Year: 1862, Registration Number: 3293.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Emma Saunderson

F, #887, b. 1827

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1827Emma Saunderson was born in 1827.
Marriage11 April 1842Emma was married to Joseph Bean, son of James Thomas John Bean Jnr. and Esther Short, on Monday, 11 April 1842 at St Marks Church, Appin, NSW, AustraliaG.1

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1842As of 11 April 1842, her married name was Bean.1

Family with

Joseph Bean b. 3 Mar 1823, d. 9 Jan 1884
Children
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Last Edited26 May 2015

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Denomination: Church of England
    Parish: Appin
    Registration Year: 1842
    Volume Reference: V1842714 26C.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Sarah McConville1

F, #888, b. circa 1812, d. 30 August 1895

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birthcirca 1812Sarah McConville was born circa 1812; based on her reported age when she died.
Marriage1877Sarah was married to Joseph Bean, son of James Thomas John Bean Jnr. and Esther Short, in 1877 at Queanbeyan, NSW, AustraliaG.2
Death30 August 1895Sarah Bean died on Friday, 30 August 1895 at NSW, AustraliaG.3

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Name VariationSarah McConville was also known as Sarah MacGouville.4
Name VariationSarah McConville was also known as Sarah McGouville.5
Married Name1877As of 1877, her married name was Bean.

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
The Goulburn Herald and Chronicle, Goulburn, NSW, AustraliaG28 June 1879Sarah McConville was mentioned in an article in The Goulburn Herald and Chronicle, Goulburn, NSW, AustraliaG, on Saturday, 28 June 1879 as follows:

GUNNING. On Tuesday evening last, at the mutual improve ment class, the debate on the Abolition of Capital Punishment was postponed for a month on account of the paucity of members present.

Serious Accident.-On Monday last Mrs. Bean of the Frankfileld Hotel, Gunning, met with a very nasty accident, which might have proved fatal. It appears that her nephew was in the bar serving customers, and having occasion to go down the cellar, which is about ten feet deep, he locked the door between the back parlour and the bar, which is a usual thing to do in case of anyone coming into the bar while the cellar was open and falling into it; but being busy serving, and Mrs. Bean having oc- casion to go into the bar and finding the door locked, she called hes nephew, who forgetting the cellar was open, opened the door and Mrs. Bean walking in and going in the direction of the cellar accidently fell into it, receiving a most dreadful shaking and some nasty bruises. Considering that Mrs. Bean is an elderly lady, it is a marvellous thing that such a fall did not end in the loss of her life. In falling she came in contact with a large cask, which must have broken her fall in some degree. Dr. Hunter was immediately called in, who attended the sufferer, and we are glad to state that she is now as well as can be expected.3

the Goulburn Evening Penny Post, Goulburn, NSW, AustraliaG3 September 1895She was mentioned in an article in the Goulburn Evening Penny Post, Goulburn, NSW, AustraliaG, on Tuesday, 3 September 1895 as follows:

Death at Gunning.
Our correspondent writes :- Mrs. Bean, relict of the late Mr. Joseph Bean, of Frankfield, died at the residence of her daughter-in-law, Mrs. A. Rodram, on Friday, about noon, in her 83rd year. She survived her husband by about 10 years. The cause of death was general decay. She leaves behind her two sons, Joseph and Charles, and a daughter, Mrs. J. Waye, of the Yass and Collector Inn. She was a sister-in-law of Mrs. J. Collet, of Goulburn. Mrs. Bean and her husband came to the district over 50 years ago. They kept an hotel at Frank field for some time, and later on built in Gunning what is now known as the Frankfield Hotel. Since the death of her husband she had never been con tent at home and had lived with her daughter-in- law for the past five years. She died quietly and peacefully.3

ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Last Edited8 Jun 2015

Citations

  1. Sarah's name may be McGouville, as shown in the NSW Index of marriages.
  2. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Queanbeyan
    Registration Year: 1877
    Registration Number: 4186.
  3. [S999] Trove, online http://trove.nla.gov.au
  4. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Marriage
    Place of Registration: Queanbeyan
    Registration Year: 1877
    Registration Number: 4186.
  5. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Marriage
    Place of Registration: Queanbeyan, NSW
    Registration year: 1877
    Registration Number.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Philip Collett

M, #889, b. 7 November 1819, d. 24 October 1876
Philip Collett
FatherWilliam Collett b. c 1788, d. Dec 1864
MotherMary Knights

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth7 November 1819Philip Collett was born on Sunday, 7 November 1819 at Botsdale, Norfolk, EnglandG.
He was the son of William Collett and Mary Knights.
Baptism19 December 1819Philip Collett was baptized on Sunday, 19 December 1819 at Wortham, Suffolk, EnglandG.1
Marriage1 November 1841Philip was married to Maria Hammond, daughter of William Hammond and Elizabeth Harbour, on Monday, 1 November 1841 at Wortham, Hartismere, EnglandG.
Marriage16 December 1845Philip was married to Lucy Bean, daughter of James Thomas John Bean Jnr. and Esther Short, on Tuesday, 16 December 1845 at St Marks Church, Appin, NSW, AustraliaG.
Death24 October 1876Philip Collett died on Tuesday, 24 October 1876 at Gunning, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 56.

Voyages

DateDetails
26 October 1843Philip Collett was a passenger aboard The Barque Neptune which sailed from Cork, IrelandG, on Thursday, 26 October 1843 and arrived in Sydney, NSW on 11th February 1844 under the Master William James Ferris. The ship was carrying 308 Bounty Emigrants; ten people died during the voyage and the ship was placed in quarantine for three days on arrival in Sydney due to smallpox.

Census Entries

Census DatePlaceDetails
1841Wortham, Suffolk, EnglandGPhilip Collett appeared on the census of 1841 in the household of William Collett and Mary Knights at Wortham, Suffolk, EnglandG.2

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
ArticleOn Monday 1st November 1841, at the age of 21, Philip married Maria Hammant, 19 years old, (Hammond) in the Parish Church of Wortham. The witnesses to the wedding were Charles Elvin, Sarah Anna Bryant and Maria's two sisters Mary and Hannah Hammant. Philip was a farm labourer and Maria was to become a school mistress. They had a baby girl, Eliza, who was born on Tuesday 12th July 1842 in Suffolk, England. Eliza was to die at the age of 52 at Maldoon in New South Wales on Monday 13th May 1895. Philip and his family emigrated to the colony of New South Wales at the invitation of Maria's father, William Hammant. The Reverand Richard Cobbold of Wortham had married Philip and Maria and in 1843 he received a letter and a sum of money from the Bishop of Sydney, Dr. Broughton, who was a nephew of the Rev. James Merest, a former curate of Wortham for 40 years. The Bishop had been approached by Maria's father following a service at Appin, NSW and asked "Sir, I have five children at Wortham, would you be so good as to write and say 'if they will come to me I will take care of them', and will you have the kindness to transmit for me this sum of money for their passage" The five children referred to are assumed to be his three daughters - Maria, Mary and Hannah - his son-in-law Philip and his grand daughter Eliza as this was the family group that subsequently sailed for Sydney on the Ship Neptune. The Rev. Cobbold wrote that "I took the whole of his family (William Hammant's) - all daughters - one married Philip Collett, who went out with her, to the Immigration Depot.

     Dear children I did weep to say farewell
     Because I knew in this life never more
     On happy faces that I loved to dwell
     I should behold them bound for distant shore
     We parted as we all must do in present pain
     That parted weeping, hoping to meet again."

     The Rev. Cobbold received a vote of thanks from the Board of Guardians on 25th October 1843 for seeing the children to Deptford to embark. The children had belonged to the Parish of Burgate. In time the Rev. Cobbold received news from the Rev. D D Sparling of Appin, NSW that the children had all arrived safely, although Maria died shortly after arrival. Rev. Cobbold passed the news on to the aged grandmother and great grandmother, both poor people in his parish. Grandmother Elizabeth Hammant lived to the age of 94 under the care of her daughter Mrs Elvin of Yaxley and we are told that "she could read to her very advanced age even without spectacles and many persons of 70 looked older than she did at ninety. Great grandmother Charity Harbour died at the age of 92.
     Maria's father William Hammant had been convicted, together with his older brother James, when stolen wheat was found in the Hammant family's Dolphin Inn near Wortham, Suffolk on the High Road Norwich to Bury. On 6th January 1832 they were sentenced at Suffolk Quarter Sessions to 14 years transportation and arrived in Sydney on 17th August 1832 on board the Lady Harewood. William is said to have became a sincere penitent in Australia and was later a church warden at Appin and was able to afford to offer to take care of his family if they would join him in Australia. Twenty Pounds to cover the cost of the voyage was given. The money was then sent to the Rev. Richard Cobbold at Wortham as mentioned previously. William's youngest daughter Hannah was born the year he was transported, 1832. His wife Elizabeth died sometime between 1832 and 1842 and the two youngest daughters Mary and Hannah then lived with their great grandmother Charity Harbour. Philip Collett was provided free passage to Sydney provided he took his two sisters-in-law under his protection for the duration of the trip and for two weeks after their arrival.
     Philip Collett, his wife and daughter arrived in Sydney on 11th February 1844 on board the ship Neptune. The Neptune was a 643 ton ship that sailed first from Deptford then Cork on 26th October 1843. She was carrying some 308 Bounty Emigrants and the list of passengers shows:

Collett, Philip     23     Farm Lab.     £18-14-0
     Maria     20     School Mistress     £18-14-0
     Eliza     1     Daughter      £9-7-0
Hammant Mary     16     Nurse          £18-14-0     Bounty
(There was no mention of 45 male and 43 female children between the ages of 1 and 14. Hannah Hammant would have been one of these)
     Ten people died during the voyage, including three infants and two small children. The ship was quarantined in Sydney on arrival for three days for smallpox.
     Philip and his family initially stayed in a house in Domain Terrace that had been taken for him by the Bishop of Sydney, who had written to Wortham to arrange the family's trip to Australia. Maria's health was only fairly good when they departed England and it deteriorated so that only three months after her arrival in Sydney she died on Tuesday 7th May 1844 at a Benevolent Asylum. The burial service was conducted by J Edmonston on the 9th May 1844. Philip and the children went to Appin where his father-in-law was living. Philip worked for the Rev. D D Sparling of Appin who wrote to the Rev. Cobbold in Wortham to confirm the arrival of the Hammant children. Following Philip's marriage to Lucy Bean they both lived and worked for Rev. Sparling in the parsonage at Appin.
     Lucy and Philip's first child, Mary, was born in the Appin parsonage. Philip later became a farmer living at Rev. Sparling's properties at Elladale, Lachlan Vale and Macquarie Dale as shown in the birth certificates of their subsequent children. While at Appin Philip was one of six local patrons elected at a public meeting to establish a Vested National School in Appin.
     The family's final move was to the Gunning area where Lucy had a number of Bean family relatives. Philip died at Gunning on Tuesday 24th October 1876.

Family with 1

Maria Hammond b. 1822, d. 7 May 1844
Child

Family with 2

Lucy Bean b. 29 Jul 1825, d. 26 Mar 1897
Children
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - William Collett
Last Edited17 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S593] Margaret Chadd & Michael Collett, "The 2nd Supplement of the Collett Saga", Report 1, 30 May 2003 from Margaret Chadd.
  2. [S515] Ian Collett, "Ancestors of Philip Collett," e-mail to Robert Mote, July 2004, e-mail report from Mrs Karen Bali, People Search Tracing Services.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

John Hoy

M, #890, b. 10 February 1819
FatherTimothy Hoy b. 1785, d. 28 Jul 1838
MotherBethia Freeman b. 1 Dec 1794, d. 1864

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
DeathJohn Hoy died at AustraliaG.
Birth10 February 1819He was born on Wednesday, 10 February 1819 at Liverpool, NSW, AustraliaG.
He was the son of Timothy Hoy and Bethia Freeman.
Marriage7 September 1846John was married to Emma Bean, daughter of James Thomas John Bean Jnr. and Esther Short, on Monday, 7 September 1846 at St Marks Church, Appin, NSW, AustraliaG.1
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Parish of Marriage Registration: Appin; Registration Year: 1846; Registration Number: V1846303 31C.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

William Gurney Thornton1

M, #891

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
BirthWilliam Gurney Thornton was born at Kent, EnglandG.
Marriage4 March 1852William Gurney was married to Sarah Jane Bean, daughter of James Thomas John Bean Jnr. and Esther Short, on Thursday, 4 March 1852 at St Marks Church, Appin, NSW, AustraliaG.2
DeathWilliam Gurney Thornton died at New South Wales, AustraliaG.

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
Occupation1876William Gurney Thornton was a fencer, as stated on his daughter's birth certificate in 1876 at Campbelltown, NSW, AustraliaG.3

Family with

Sarah Jane Bean b. 9 Nov 1834, d. 8 Dec 1921
Children
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Last Edited17 Aug 2013

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Marriage Registration: Appin, Registration Year: 1852, Registration Number: V1852459 38C.
  2. [S83] Letter, John Lambeth to Robert Mote, 21 November 1990.
  3. [S125] Letter, Robyn Bode to Robert Mote, March 2000.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

John Kentwell

M, #892, b. 29 February 1804, d. 9 October 1897
John Kentwell
FatherWilliam Kentwell b. 23 Mar 1761, d. 8 Jan 1809
MotherElizabeth Morris b. 31 Aug 1777, d. 25 Jan 1852

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth29 February 1804John Kentwell was born on Wednesday, 29 February 1804 at Hawkesbury River, NSW, Australia.
He was the son of William Kentwell and Elizabeth Morris.
Marriage9 August 1824John was married to Elizabeth James, daughter of Samuel James and Ann Bean, on Monday, 9 August 1824 at St John's Church of England, Parramatta, NSW, AustraliaG.
Death9 October 1897John Kentwell died on Saturday, 9 October 1897 at Castle Hill, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 93.

Family with

Elizabeth James b. 6 Sep 1810, d. 27 May 1885
Children
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Last Edited6 Dec 2004

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Simon Moulds

M, #893, b. 29 March 1805, d. 31 October 1874
FatherSimon Moulds b. 1775, d. 17 Jun 1843
MotherAnn Davis b. 1773, d. 11 Mar 1854

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth29 March 1805Simon Moulds was born on Friday, 29 March 1805 at Parramatta, NSW, AustraliaG.1
He was the son of Simon Moulds and Ann Davis.
Baptism19 May 1805Simon Moulds was baptized on Sunday, 19 May 1805 at St John's Church of England, Parramatta, NSW, AustraliaG.1
Marriage25 January 1830Simon was married to Rosetta James, daughter of Samuel James and Ann Bean, by Reverend Samuel Marsden on Monday, 25 January 1830 at Parramatta, NSWG.
Death31 October 1874Simon Moulds died on Saturday, 31 October 1874 at Castle Hill, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 69.
Burialafter 31 October 1874He was buried after 31 October 1874 at St Pauls Church of England cemetery, Castle Hill, NSW, AustraliaG.1
Probate27 November 1874His estate was probated on 27 November 1874 at New South Wales, AustraliaG, probate number 1065.1

Census Entries

Census DatePlaceDetails
1828New South Wales, AustraliaGSimon Moulds appeared on the census of 1828 at New South Wales, AustraliaG, and his entry shows him as a settler at Castle Hill with 60 acres of which 10 acres were cleared and 10 were cultivated. He had one horse and seven cattle.2

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
Education12 August 1870Simon Moulds signed his will with a mark so we can assume he could not read and write.1
Occupationbefore 1874He was a farmer and fruit grower before 1874.

Family with

Rosetta James b. 9 Jul 1814, d. 9 Sep 1889
Children
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Last Edited20 Aug 2000

Citations

  1. [S43] T S New, New Family History.
  2. [S4] M R Sainty and K A Johnson, NSW 1828 Census, page 277, Ref. No. M3289.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Elizabeth Florella Brien

F, #894, b. 26 September 1819, d. 13 July 1909
Elizabeth Florella Brien
FatherDaniel Brien b. 1770, d. 22 Aug 1837
MotherMary Ann Parker b. 10 Apr 1789, d. 13 Jul 1865

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth26 September 1819Elizabeth Florella Brien was born on Sunday, 26 September 1819 at Seven Hills, NSW, AustraliaG.
She was the daughter of Daniel Brien and Mary Ann Parker.
Baptism6 February 1820Elizabeth Florella Brien was baptized on Sunday, 6 February 1820 at St John's Church of England, Parramatta, NSW, AustraliaG.
Marriage4 April 1836Elizabeth Florella was married to John Robert James, son of Samuel James and Ann Bean, on Monday, 4 April 1836 at Parramatta, NSWG.
Death13 July 1909Elizabeth Florella Brien died on Tuesday, 13 July 1909 at Kellyville, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 89.
Burial14 July 1909She was buried on 14 July 1909 at St Pauls Cemetery, Castle Hill, NSW, AustraliaG.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1836As of 4 April 1836, her married name was James.

Census Entries

Census DatePlaceDetails
1828NSW, AustraliaGElizabeth Florella Brien appeared on the census of 1828 in the household of Daniel Brien and Mary Ann Parker at NSW, AustraliaG; and are shown as living at Seven Hills with 300 acres, 50 acres cleared and cultivated, 5 horses and 97 cattle.1

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
The Cumberland Argus Fruit Growers' Journal, NSW, Australia14 July 1909Elizabeth Florella Brien had an obituary appear in The Cumberland Argus Fruit Growers' Journal, NSW, Australia, on Wednesday, 14 July 1909 as follows: Death of Elizabeth James
July 13 James, at Kellyville, at residence of her son H G James, Elizabeth, relic of John James of Castle Hill, in her 90th year.

Family with

John Robert James b. 10 Oct 1816, d. 6 Jan 1897
Children
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Last Edited3 May 2008

Citations

  1. [S4] M R Sainty and K A Johnson, NSW 1828 Census, page: 61, record # B2298.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Amelia Ann Fishburn

F, #895, b. 14 November 1823, d. 15 June 1909
FatherWilliam Henry Fishburn b. 7 Aug 1795, d. 19 Apr 1872
MotherCatherine Ash b. 5 Jul 1796, d. 14 Feb 1839

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth14 November 1823Amelia Ann Fishburn was born on Friday, 14 November 1823 at Hills District, NSW, AustraliaG.1,2
She was the daughter of William Henry Fishburn and Catherine Ash.
Marriage26 July 1841Amelia Ann Fishburn married James James, son of Samuel James and Ann Bean, on Monday, 26 July 1841 at St Simons Church, Rogans Hill, NSW, AustraliaG.
St. Simons church was originally a stone barracks built in 1801 for convicts. It was later used as a lunatic asylum and from 1828 it was used for church purposes. In 1840 it became a parish church and was eventually demolished between 1850 and 1860. Records of St. Simon church were transferred to St. Pauls church, Castle Hill.
Death15 June 1909Amelia Ann Fishburn died on Tuesday, 15 June 1909 at NSW, AustraliaG, at age 85.
Burialcirca 16 June 1909She was buried circa 16 June 1909 at Mile End Road cemetery, Rouse Hill, NSW, AustraliaG.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1841As of 26 July 1841, her married name was James.

Family with

James James b. 30 Nov 1820, d. 9 Feb 1905
Children
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Descendant Chart - Andrew Fishburn
Last Edited21 Aug 2000

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Parish of Registration: Parramatta, St John's; Year: 1824; Number: V18241527 148.
  2. [S129] Letter, Elisabeth Jill Clift to Robert Mote, 20 April 2000.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Joseph Hendle

M, #896, b. 19 February 1815, d. 1859
FatherJohn Hendle b. 5 Jul 1789, d. 19 Feb 1823 or 22 Feb 1823
MotherEsther Beckett b. 2 Apr 1798, d. 24 Aug 1840

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth19 February 1815Joseph Hendle was born on Sunday, 19 February 1815 at Parramatta, NSW, AustraliaG.1
He was the son of John Hendle and Esther Beckett.
MarriageJoseph was married to Sarah Unknown at New South Wales, AustraliaG.
Marriage19 October 1840Joseph was married to Lucy Jane James, daughter of Samuel James and Ann Bean, on Monday, 19 October 1840 at St John's Church of England, Parramatta, NSW, AustraliaG.2,3
Marriage16 December 1845Joseph was married to Lucy Jane James, daughter of Samuel James and Ann Bean, on Tuesday, 16 December 1845 at St Marks Church, Appin, NSW, AustraliaG.
Death1859Joseph Hendle died in 1859 at Queensland, AustraliaG.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Name Variation1840As of 1840, Joseph Hendle was also known as Hindle as shown in their marriage entry in the NSW BDM Index.3

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
Occupationbefore 1859Joseph Hendle was a farmer before 1859.4

Family with 1

Sarah Unknown
Child

Family with 2

Lucy Jane James b. 2 Oct 1822, d. 1901
Children
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Last Edited3 Jun 2006

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Birth Registration: Parramatta, St John's; Year of Registration: 1815; Registration Number: V18153546 1A.
  2. [S43] T S New, New Family History.
  3. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Marriage Registration: Parramatta, St John's; Year of Registration: 1840; Registration Number: V1840345 24B.
  4. [S604] Douglas Mason McDougall, "Alfred George Hubert McDougall's Family," e-mail to Robert Mote, May 2006.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

John Sharp

M, #897, b. 23 May 1855, d. 26 November 1889
John Sharp

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth23 May 1855John Sharp was born on Wednesday, 23 May 1855 at AustraliaG.
Marriage3 May 1880John was married to Martha Maria Alt, daughter of Christopher Alt and Martha Crossley, on Monday, 3 May 1880 at Yass, NSW, AustraliaG.
Death26 November 1889John Sharp died on Tuesday, 26 November 1889 at AustraliaG at age 34.

Family with

Martha Maria Alt b. 23 Jan 1863, d. 13 Apr 1934
Children
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - James Crossley
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Thomas Fox

M, #898, b. 1857, d. 6 March 1941
Thomas Fox

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1857Thomas Fox was born in 1857 at Gloucester, EnglandG.
MarriageOctober 1879Thomas was married to Ellen Rayward, daughter of Richard Rayward, in October 1879.
Marriage6 July 1892Thomas was married to Martha Maria Alt, daughter of Christopher Alt and Martha Crossley, on Wednesday, 6 July 1892 at Murrumburrah, NSW, AustraliaG.1
Death6 March 1941Thomas Fox died on Thursday, 6 March 1941 at Coogee, NSW, AustraliaG.
Burialafter 6 March 1941He was buried after 6 March 1941 at Randwick, NSW, AustraliaG.

Family with 1

Ellen Rayward d. 1891
Children

Family with 2

Martha Maria Alt b. 23 Jan 1863, d. 13 Apr 1934
Children
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - James Crossley
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Last Edited21 Jan 2001

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Murrumburrah; Year: 1892; Number: 5212.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

John Cox

M, #900, b. 19 March 1845, d. 13 January 1907
FatherRobert Cox b. c 1808, d. 8 Oct 1888
MotherMary Tafy b. c 1824, d. 4 Apr 1877

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth19 March 1845John Cox was born on Wednesday, 19 March 1845 at NSW, AustraliaG.1
He was the son of Robert Cox and Mary Tafy.
Birth18 December 1845John Cox was born on Thursday, 18 December 1845 at Yass, NSW, AustraliaG.2
Marriage2 January 1865John was married to Jane Crossley, daughter of Jeremiah Crossley and Sarah James, on Monday, 2 January 1865 at the bride's father's house, Wargiela (near Yass), NSW, AustraliaG; by special licence.3,4
Death13 January 1907John Cox died on Sunday, 13 January 1907 at Yass, NSWG, at age 61.5
Burialafter 13 January 1907He was buried after 13 January 1907 at Roman Catholic cemetery, Yass, NSW, AustraliaG; The inscription on the headstone reads - John COX, died 13 Jan 1907 aged 62 years.6

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
OccupationJohn Cox was a Carrier.2

Family with

Jane Crossley b. 28 Dec 1846, d. 9 Jul 1922
Children
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - James Crossley
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Last Edited18 Feb 2005

Citations

  1. [S500] Sue-Ann Burton, "Robert Cox's Descendants," e-mail to Robert Mote, 18 February 2005.
  2. [S151] Grieves Family and Yass Indexes, online http://members.iinet.net.au/~sgrieves/grieves_family.htm
  3. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Yass
    Registration Year: 1865
    Registration Number: 3556.
  4. [S151] Grieves Family and Yass Indexes, online http://members.iinet.net.au/~sgrieves/grieves_family.htm, Yass Courier Index, page 7 of 31.
  5. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Yass
    Registration Year: 1907
    Registration Number: 3319.
  6. [S10] Pam Ray, Yass Cemetery, Page: 67
    Number: 1428.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.