Enid Agnes Graham Alt

F, #61, b. 5 February 1911, d. 28 February 2007
FatherJohn Alt b. 13 Mar 1867, d. 23 Dec 1935
MotherMary Ann Crawford Smith b. 15 Jul 1872, d. 18 Dec 1929
Relationships1st cousin 1 time removed of Robert Mote
3rd great-granddaughter of James Thomas John Bean
2nd great-granddaughter of James Crossley

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth5 February 1911Enid Agnes Graham Alt was born on Sunday, 5 February 1911 at Smollett Street, Albury, NSW, Australia.1
She was the daughter of John Alt and Mary Ann Crawford Smith.
Marriage30 November 1935Enid Agnes Graham Alt was married to Dr. Stanley George Bradfield, son of John Job Crew Bradfield and Edith Jenkins, on Saturday, 30 November 1935 at The Chapel of the Sydney Church of England Grammar School, North Sydney, NSW, Australia.2,3
Death28 February 2007Enid Agnes Graham Alt died on Wednesday, 28 February 2007 at Canberra, ACT, Australia, at age 96.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1935As of 30 November 1935, her married name was Bradfield.

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
Occupation1935Enid Agnes Graham Alt was a nurse in 1935.
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - James Crossley
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Last Edited18 Apr 2007

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Albury; Year of Registration: 1911; Registration Number: 12517.
  2. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: North Sydney; Year: 1935; Number: 18910.
  3. [S208] Certificate, marriage, Marriage Certificate for Stanley George Bradfield & Enid Agnes Alt.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Dr. Stanley George Bradfield

M, #63, b. 12 September 1906, d. 12 August 1951
Stanley George Bradfield
FatherJohn Job Crew Bradfield b. 26 Dec 1867, d. 23 Sep 1943
MotherEdith Jenkins b. 1869, d. 1954

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth12 September 1906Dr. Stanley George Bradfield was born on Wednesday, 12 September 1906 at Park Avenue, Gordon, NSW, Australia.1,2
He was the son of John Job Crew Bradfield and Edith Jenkins.
Marriage30 November 1935Dr. Stanley George Bradfield was married to Enid Agnes Graham Alt, daughter of John Alt and Mary Ann Crawford Smith, on Saturday, 30 November 1935 at The Chapel of the Sydney Church of England Grammar School, North Sydney, NSW, Australia.3,4
Death12 August 1951Dr. Stanley George Bradfield died on Sunday, 12 August 1951 at The Drive, Stanwell Park, NSW, Australia, at age 44.5
Cremation14 August 1951He was cremated on 14 August 1951 at Northern Suburbs Crematorium, Sydney, NSW, Australia.5

Military Service

EventDateDetails
Mil-Action1 July 1941Dr. Stanley George Bradfield enlisted with the 2/12 Australian General Hospital on 1 July 1941, embarked from Australia on 7 October 1941, embarked for return to Australia on 9 January 1943 and his appointment was terminated on 13 February 1945.

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
The Medical Journal of Australia, Australia29 September 1951Dr. Stanley George Bradfield had an obituary appear in The Medical Journal of Australia, Australia, on Saturday, 29 September 1951 as follows:

We are indebted to Dr. S. Livingstone Spencer for the following appreciation of the late Dr. Stanley George Bradfield.

     Stanley George Bradfield was killed in an accident on August 12, 1951. He had taken a tree-felling expert to his holiday property at Stanwell Park in order to dispose of a tree which endangered a neighbour's home. A rope which was being used fouled a second tree, and then whipped with tremendous force against Bradfield's chest, breaking his ribs and causing intrathoracic injuries which were immediately fatal.
     Stan Bradfield was born at Gordon in New South Wales in 1906, and came of a distinguished family. His father was the late Dr J J C Bradfield, for many years chief engineer for metropolitan railway construction, and designer of the Sydney Harbour Bridge. His mother, sister and four brothers survive him including Dr. E. V. Bradfield formerly of Belmont and now practicing in Arncliffe, Sydney. He was educated at the Sydney Church of England Grammar School, and passed the leaving certificate examination with first class honours in mathematics and physics, going on to receive his undergraduate education at the University of Sydney. Always near the top of his year, he won the Parkinson Memorial Prize for pathology and bacteriology, and graduated in 1930 with first class honours. During the last three years of his medical course he was a member of Saint Paul's College.
     He was appointed to the resident medical staff of the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, and after terms in residence at the Royal South Sydney Hospital, the Women's Hospital, Crown Street, and the Royal Alexandra Hospital for Children, he went abroad for post-graduate study, and remained in England from 1933 to 1935, gaining further experience as resident medical officer at the Stockton and Thornaby District Hospital and at the Hampstead Children's Hospital. During this period, also, he passed the examination for membership of the Royal College of Physicians, London. Later, in 1938, he became a foundation member of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians.
     On his return to Sydney in 1935, Bradfield commenced in general practice at Bankstown, a suburb of Sydney, in succession to the late Dr. E. M. Goard. Here, by his ability, his boundless energy and his conscientious devotion to his calling, he attracted a wide circle of patients, who were also his friends. Always a lover of children, he gave more and more attention to paediatrics, and in 1950 he entirely relinquished the care of his adult patients to Dr. Colin Ratcliff and from then on restricted his practice to the treatment of sick children, whom he saw at Bankstown and in his rooms in Macquarie Street, Sydney. He had been a member of the honorary medical staff of the Royal Alexandra Hospital for Children since 1936, and an honorary physician since 1949. He had also served the hospital for two years as secretary to the honorary medical staff, and had been a tutor in paediatrics in the University of Sydney. In 1949, when the Government of New South Wales set up a panel of consultants who might be called to examine patients suspected of having anterior poliomyelitis, Bradfield was one of the two nominees of the Royal Alexandria Hospital for Children. He attended the Australasian Medical Congress (British Medical Association) in Brisbane in 1950, and the inaugural meeting of the Paediatric Association of Australia, of which he was a foundation member. On seceral occasions he lectured on child health for the Post-Graduate Committee in Medecine in the University of Sydney. In 1941 Bradfield went overseas with the 2/12 Australian General Hospital, and soon rose to the rank of major, returning to practice in 1944.
     In 1935 Stan Bradfield married Miss Enid Alt, also of Gordon. Only a few months before his untimely death he had acquired a beautiful home in this suburb, and was looking forward to the full indulgence of one of his keenest interests, that of gardening. His love of the open air was an expression of his unflagging energy, and his close friends will remember the slender tireless figure which tramped briskly ahead through the bush when his companions would willingly have rested or turned back. The operas of Gilbert and Sullivan formed another interest. Bradfield knew many of the songs by heart, and every Gilbert and Sullivan season saw him prominent in the audience.
     Always a devoted husband and father, Stan Bradfield leaves his widow and four young children, two daughters and two sons. He is also mourned by countless patients and friends, who knew him as a fine physician and a staunch comrade. The memory of Stan Bradfield's sincerity and generosity will live on in the hearts of those who knew him together with universal sorrow that he should have been taken from us when he stood on the threshold of a great career.
     Dr. Lennox Price writes: Stanley Bradfield's brilliant academic record and his skill as a physician were known by many, but it is of his more personal qualities that I wish to write. Our two families being linked in friendship, it naturally followed, on our return from active service , that our children should be growing up together, and that we should associate more closely. Here it was, within the family circle, that one saw him in his happiest moments for he loved all children, and in his devotion to his own he was, I believe, the ideal parent. Firm when necessary, but always kindly and never patronizing, he seemed naturally to draw children to him; and it was surely fitting that paediatrics should be his chosen specialty. It became necessary to seek his help in the case of one of my own children and I was thus able to appraise at first hand the careful history-taking and meticulous physical examination, followed by the necessary advice, all quietly and without fuss or frill. He possessed no artificial airs and graces, nor did he seem to encourage those who adopted them. The somewhat clipped form of speech gave a first impression of an abrupt manner, but this was mollified by a bubbling sense of humour, which would burst forth at unexpected moments, and one learnt to appreciate the sudden quip, followed by the merry twinkle of the eye which was his characteristic.
     Of small stature, he yet possessed an inexhaustible fund of physical and mental energy, and was never idle for a moment. Up with the lark, he would be off on an early morning consultation long before the normal breakfast hour, or when time permitted he might be found energetically tilling his kitchen garden in which he took a pride. Work or the welfare of his patients was his chief concern; but his great delight was to take a brief respite with his children at his holiday retreat at Stanwell Park. Tragically, it was in this manner that he met his death, for while he was felling a tree, no doubt in preparation for summer camps, the fatal accident occurred. Death, we are told, was instantaneous.
     Our sympathy goes out to his widow and the four young children whom he left, the oldest a girl aged twelve years and the youngest a baby boy a little over one year old.
     Medicine in this generation could ill afford to lose such a man as Stan Bradfield.6

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
Occupation1935Dr. Stanley George Bradfield was a medical practitioner in 1935.
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - James Crossley
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Last Edited18 Apr 2001

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: St Leonards; Year: 1906; Number: 38948.
  2. [S235] Birth Certificate, No: 498, in the District of St Leonards, Willoughby and Warringah, NSW.
  3. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: North Sydney; Year: 1935; Number: 18910.
  4. [S208] Certificate, marriage, Marriage Certificate for Stanley George Bradfield & Enid Agnes Alt.
  5. [S106] Death Certificate, for S G Bradfield, Robert Mote, 1 Ringrose Crescent, Isaacs, ACT, Australia.
  6. [S244] Medical Journal of Australia, 29 September 1951.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Mary Lewis

F, #64, b. circa 1803

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birthcirca 1803Mary Lewis was born circa 1803.
Marriage17 December 1827She was married to William James, son of Samuel James and Ann Bean, on Monday, 17 December 1827 at St John's Church of England, Parramatta, NSW, Australia.1

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1827As of 17 December 1827, her married name was James.1

Voyages

DateDetails
8 September 1826Mary Lewis was a convict aboard The Ship Grenada which sailed from The Downs, Kent, England, on Friday, 8 September 1826 and arrived in Sydney, NSW on 23 January 1827 under the Master John Tracy.
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Last Edited5 Dec 2000

Citations

  1. [S49] Lynn Smith, "Thomas Beane", Record #7.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Ethel Vere McKinnon

F, #65, b. 1890, d. 1970
Ethel & Peg McKinnon
FatherLachlan McKinnon b. 29 Nov 1850, d. 3 Dec 1928
MotherMargaret Ann Powell Faulder b. 1852, d. 9 Dec 1928

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1890Ethel Vere McKinnon was born in 1890 at Yass, NSW, Australia.1
She was the daughter of Lachlan McKinnon and Margaret Ann Powell Faulder.
Marriage16 November 1917Ethel Vere was married to Walter John Mote, son of James Frederick Mote and Martha Crossley, on Friday, 16 November 1917 at Yass, NSW.
Death1970Ethel Vere McKinnon died in 1970 at Sydney, NSW, Australia.2

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1917As of 16 November 1917, her married name was Mote.

Family with

Walter John Mote b. 15 Oct 1884, d. 1965
Child
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - James Crossley
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Descendant Chart - John William Mote
Last Edited22 Oct 2005

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Birth Registration: Yass, Registration Year: 1890, Registration Number: 38741.
  2. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Number: 4356/1970.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

John Farndale

M, #66, b. 25 February 1723/24, d. 24 January 1807
FatherJohn Farndale b. 27 Jun 1680, d. 5 Oct 1757
MotherElizabeth Bennison b. c 1685, d. c 1 May 1726
Relationships5th great-grandfather of Robert Mote
4th great-grandson of Nicholas Farndaile

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth25 February 1723/24John Farndale was born on Friday, 25 February 1723/24 at Brotton, Yorkshire, England.
He was the son of John Farndale and Elizabeth Bennison.
Baptism28 February 1723/24John Farndale was baptized on Monday, 28 February 1723/24 at Brotton, Yorkshire.1
Marriage16 April 1750John was married to Grace Simpson on Thursday, 16 April 1750 at Brotton, Yorkshire.2
Death24 January 1807John Farndale died on Saturday, 24 January 1807 at Brotton, Yorkshire, at age 82.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Name VariationJohn Farndale was also known as "Old Farndale" of Kilton.3

Family with

Grace Simpson b. 1733, d. 3 May 1789
Children
ChartsPedigree Chart for Robert Mote
Descendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Last Edited17 Nov 2001

Citations

  1. [S192] The Farndale Directory, online http://www.farndalefamily.co.uk, Volume 1, Page 48.
  2. [S192] The Farndale Directory, online http://www.farndalefamily.co.uk, Volume 1, Page 60.
  3. [S192] The Farndale Directory, online http://www.farndalefamily.co.uk

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

William Farndale

M, #67, b. 30 March 1760, d. 11 March 1846
FatherJohn Farndale b. 25 Feb 1723/24, d. 24 Jan 1807
MotherGrace Simpson b. 1733, d. 3 May 1789
Relationships4th great-grandfather of Robert Mote
5th great-grandson of Nicholas Farndaile

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth30 March 1760William Farndale was born on Sunday, 30 March 1760 at England.
Baptism30 March 1760He was baptized on Sunday, 30 March 1760 at Brotton, Yorkshire, England.1
He was the son of John Farndale and Grace Simpson.
Marriage20 September 1789William was married to Mary Ferguson by J Parrington, Minister on Sunday, 20 September 1789 at Brotton, Yorkshire.1
Death11 March 1846William Farndale died on Wednesday, 11 March 1846 at England at age 85.

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
PhotoHis home Gilling Wood Hall, England.

Family with

Mary Ferguson b. 1761, d. 25 Mar 1843
Children
ChartsPedigree Chart for Robert Mote
Descendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Last Edited18 Apr 2009

Citations

  1. [S192] The Farndale Directory, online http://www.farndalefamily.co.uk

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Mary Ferguson

F, #68, b. 1761, d. 25 March 1843
Relationship4th great-grandmother of Robert Mote

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1761Mary Ferguson was born in 1761 at England.
Marriage20 September 1789Mary was married to William Farndale, son of John Farndale and Grace Simpson, by J Parrington, Minister on Sunday, 20 September 1789 at Brotton, Yorkshire, England.1
Death25 March 1843Mary Ferguson died on Saturday, 25 March 1843 at England.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1789As of 20 September 1789, her married name was Farndale.

Family with

William Farndale b. 30 Mar 1760, d. 11 Mar 1846
Children
ChartsPedigree Chart for Robert Mote
Descendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Last Edited6 Jan 2007

Citations

  1. [S192] The Farndale Directory, online http://www.farndalefamily.co.uk

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Matthew Farndale

M, #69, b. 30 September 1793, d. 8 August 1884
Matthew Farndale
FatherWilliam Farndale b. 30 Mar 1760, d. 11 Mar 1846
MotherMary Ferguson b. 1761, d. 25 Mar 1843
Relationships3rd great-grandfather of Robert Mote
6th great-grandson of Nicholas Farndaile

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth30 September 1793Matthew Farndale was born on Monday, 30 September 1793 at Kilton, Yorkshire, England.
He was the son of William Farndale and Mary Ferguson.
Baptism3 November 1793Matthew Farndale was baptized on Sunday, 3 November 1793 at Brotton, Yorkshire, England.1
Marriage13 May 1829Matthew was married to Hannah Thompson on Wednesday, 13 May 1829 at Brotton, Yorkshire.1
Death8 August 1884Matthew Farndale died on Friday, 8 August 1884 at Birregurra, VIC, Australia, at age 90.
Burial11 August 1884He was buried on 11 August 1884 at the Irrewarra cemetery, Warncoort, VIC, Australia.

Voyages

DateDetails
8 October 1852Matthew Farndale was a passenger aboard The Ship Argo which sailed from Liverpool, Lancashire, England, on Friday, 8 October 1852 and arrived in Melbourne, Australia on 19th January 1853 after a journey of 103 days. The Master was Samuel Macodock and there was a total of 242 passengers aboard.2

Census Entries

Census DatePlaceDetails
1841Kilton, Yorkshire, EnglandMatthew Farndale appeared on the census of 1841 at Kilton, Yorkshire, England, and is listed as a farmer of 45 years of age.2
1851Hallgarth, Kildale, Yorkshire, EnglandHe appeared on the census of 1851 at Hallgarth, Kildale, Yorkshire, England, and is listed as a farmer of 57 years of age with 150 acres and two labourers.2

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
The Geelong Advertiser, Geelong, VIC, Australia15 July 1878Matthew Farndale was mentioned in an article in The Geelong Advertiser, Geelong, VIC, Australia, on Monday, 15 July 1878 as follows:

THE GOVERNMENT GAZETTE.

The following notices appear in the
Gazette :-

Mr Edward Darling, Clerk of Courts at Steiglitz, has been appointed a Commissioner
of the Supreme Court.

The following have been appointed trustees :-Mr John Bell, for land temporarily reserved as a site for a cemetery at Bambra, in the room of Mr J. Dennithorne, who has left the colony; Messrs Alex. and Richard Dennis, Samuel Gilbert, Samuel Talbot, and Matthew Farndale, for land temporarily reserved as a site for Wesleyan Church purposes at Birregurra; Messrs Francis Orinon and Chas. Shannon, for land reserved as a site for a Presbyterian place of worship and minister's dwelling in the town of Geelong.3

The Colac Herald, Colac, VIC, Australia12 August 1884He was mentioned in an article in The Colac Herald, Colac, VIC, Australia, on Tuesday, 12 August 1884 as follows:

We regret to record the death of Mr. Matthew Farndale, a very old and respected resident of this district, which took place on Friday last at his residence, Birregurra. Mr. Farndale, who had reached the great old age of 90 years, was a wonderfully robust and sound constitutioned man, but, of course, during late years a general breaking up of the system was taking place, and his death was not unexpected. His remains were interred in the Irrewarra cemetery yesterday afternoon in the presence of a large number of friends and acquaintances of the family.3

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
Articlebetween 1835 and 1850All the Poll Books between 1835 and 1850 show Matthew Farndale as 'Farmer; occupier of Kilton Hall Farm.2'
PhotoHis home at Kilton, Yorkshire, England.
PhotoMatthew Farndale helped establish the Birregurra Methodist Church.
Article1893The details of Matthew's and Hannah's deaths also appear on his twin brother's headstone in the Old Churchyard at Brotton in Yorkshire as follows:

Memorial of William son of William and Mary Farndale who died October 21st 1831 aged 38 years. Also to Matthew Farndale, twin brother of the above of Birregurra, Australia, who died 8th August 1884 aged 90 years. Also of Hannah his widow who died, 9th December 1892 aged 85 years.

Blessed are the dead, that lie in The Lord.4

Family with

Hannah Thompson b. 11 Oct 1807, d. 9 Dec 1892
Children
ChartsPedigree Chart for Robert Mote
Descendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Last Edited11 Jan 2015

Citations

  1. [S192] The Farndale Directory, online http://www.farndalefamily.co.uk, Volume 2, Page 36.
  2. [S192] The Farndale Directory, online http://www.farndalefamily.co.uk, Volume 2, Page 37.
  3. [S999] Trove, online http://trove.nla.gov.au
  4. [S192] The Farndale Directory, online http://www.farndalefamily.co.uk, Volume 2, Page 35.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Hannah Thompson

F, #70, b. 11 October 1807, d. 9 December 1892
Hannah Farndale (née Thompson)
Relationship3rd great-grandmother of Robert Mote

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth11 October 1807Hannah Thompson was born on Sunday, 11 October 1807 at Sleights, Yorkshire, England.
Marriage13 May 1829Hannah was married to Matthew Farndale, son of William Farndale and Mary Ferguson, on Wednesday, 13 May 1829 at Brotton, Yorkshire, England.1
Death9 December 1892Hannah Thompson died on Friday, 9 December 1892 at Birregurra, VIC, Australia, at age 85.
BurialShe was buried at Warncoort, VIC, Australia.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1829As of 13 May 1829, her married name was Farndale.

Voyages

DateDetails
8 October 1852Hannah Thompson was a passenger aboard The Ship Argo which sailed from Liverpool, Lancashire, England, on Friday, 8 October 1852 and arrived in Melbourne, Australia on 19th January 1853 after a journey of 103 days. The Master was Samuel Macodock and there was a total of 242 passengers aboard.2

Census Entries

Census DatePlaceDetails
1841Kilton, Yorkshire, EnglandHannah Thompson appeared on the census of 1841 at Kilton, Yorkshire, England; and is listed as 30 years of age.2
1851Hallgarth, Kildale, Yorkshire, EnglandShe appeared on the census of 1851 at Hallgarth, Kildale, Yorkshire, England, and is listed as 43 years of age and born at Sleights.2

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
The Colac Herald, Colac, VIC, Australia23 December 1892Hannah Farndale was mentioned in an article in The Colac Herald, Colac, VIC, Australia, on Friday, 23 December 1892 as follows:

MEMORIAL SERVICE -It is not often a minister is called upon to hold a double memorial service, but on Sunday evening last this solemn duty devolved on the Rev. H. J. Cock, who conducted a special service in memory of Mr John Gaylard and Mrs Hannah Farndale, two old and respected members of the Wesleyan Church.
The rev. gentleman based his sermon on the words "The sting of death is sin and the strength of sin is the law." But thanks be to God which giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ " (I Corinthians XV. 56.57.) He commenced by relating the parable of the angel of sleep and the angel of death in illustration of the universally natural aversion in man to death. We welcome sleep, and are to glad to have our senses locked in its sweet and refreshing embrace. But with what hated breath we speak to death. There were all around them the signs and emblems of mourning, many of those present having known what bereavement was. He would like to ask them how it was that such a horror centres in and around the dying hour? St. Paul gave us the explanation where he says "the sting of death is sin and the strength of sin is the law." Another cause was that in death we cease to be, Everything clings most tenaciously to life: man as well as the brute creation. Then again death separates bcdy and soul, after having been closely linked or welded together, for say 70 years. There is also the fear of ceasing to be, the fear that death will blot out our existence for ever. But faith looks beyond, to that home prepared for the soul. Loved ones may minister to us in the dying hour, they may go down to the very verge of the grave, and we may hear them say the last fond good-bye, the last fond farewell, yet we must all pass out of this world in utter loneliness, that is, to the soul out of Christ. The apostle, while not ex cluding these causes of pain and anguish from the dying hour, lays stress on the fact that the sting of death is sin, and, as Shakespeare says " Conscience makes cowards of us all." In that hour how many sins crowd in upon us, and we feel terror stricken at going out into eternity and meeting God, if he is not our friend. Innocence is not afraid to die, but guilt always is. The little babe is not afraid to die, and had we re tained the innocence of early life, we should not be afraid, but the angel passed out of man and the devil came in. It was no wonder that man was afraid to be called to the bar of God's judgement remembering how often he had broken His law. Turning from the dark side of the picture he drew the attention of his hearers to the bright side, as contained in Paul's words " But thanks be unto God which giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ." Fear of death may be conquered in many ways. There was a certain amount of steel and iron in man, by which he could nerve himself for the trying ordeal, as was often the case with the infidel, the scoffer, and the world ling. It was said that Jay Gould died calmly and peace fully, but of a man who had lived such a life as he had it might well be said " Ephraim is joined to idols; let him alone." Jay Gould had made gold his God, and bent all his energies in acquiring wealth ; so God let him alone, and he who com menced life by selling mouse-traps died worth £14,000,000. God giveth us the victory in overcoming the sins thatoppresses our lives. Thechristian had the victory over death, and in a joyful resurrection ; and also had a final victory at the bar of God. Thus there was the victory of pardon, of sin, of the broken law, of death and the resurrection, and then the passing in to the eternal home. Of the two whose memory he would bring to their remembrance that night, and who had worshipped with them in past times, they had passed in to their reward. He then proceeded to read an obituary notice of each of the departed, of which the following is a summary :
John Gaylard was born on the 10th August, 1818, in Martick, England, and came to Australia, landing in Adelaide in 1853. In the following year he came over to Victoria, and almost immediately settled in Colac, where he continued to reside until his death. In 1842, eleven years before leaving England, he was married to Mliss Emma Locock, on his 24th birthday. Being a man of modest gifts he never took a -prominent part in church work or secular matters. His christian life was a very quiet, retired one, though he was always ready to talk about spiritual things, and was a constant attendant at the Sabbath services. His last illness was an exceedingly painful one, but in the midst of all the joy of the Lord was his strength. The Lord was with himin the fiery furnace, and his testi mony to the supporting grace of God was most satisfactory. His last in telligent communication was a requ s! made to his daughter to sing the hymns " Down at the Cross," and "My God I am Thine," and to read the 14th chapter of St John's gospel. Shortly afterwards he fell into a comatose state, and lingered for two or three . days until Wednesday, Nov 9th, when he fell asleep in Jesus.
Hannah, relict of the late Mathew Farndale was born in Slights, York shire, England on the 11th October 1807. She was married in 1828, and in 1853 accompanied her husband to to this colony, providence directing their steps into the Colac district. Here their children grew to manhood and womanhood; here their grand children climbed their grandsire's knee "the envied kiss to share," and here too the aged grandparents saw and blessed the children of the fourth generation. About eight years ago the fond husband, on whose strong arm the wife had leaned, and in whose love she had dwelt for 56 years was taken from her side to the higher life and service of heaven. The loneliness of widowhood has been greatly cheered by the presence sympathy, and loving kindness of her children. Not quite three years ago the sad affliction of blindness rendered her life yet sadder still, and the present being shut out from view, she naturally lingered on the past, to her so full of love and happiness. When a girl she was associated with the Church of England, but before her marriage she joined as a member of the Wesleyan Methodist Church, and during her long life remained a most consistent loyal member of the church. Though ailing for a long time past the end came rather un expectedly on Friday, December 9th. How bright the vision that suddenly burst upon her gaze. Now she sees the King in His beauty. Those darkened orbs are now feasting in delight on Him who is the fairest among ten thousand and altogether lovely.3



Other Details

LabelDateDetails
Article1893The details of Matthew's and Hannah's deaths also appear on his twin brother's headstone in the Old Churchyard at Brotton in Yorkshire as follows:

Memorial of William son of William and Mary Farndale who died October 21st 1831 aged 38 years. Also to Matthew Farndale, twin brother of the above of Birregurra, Australia, who died 8th August 1884 aged 90 years. Also of Hannah his widow who died, 9th December 1892 aged 85 years.

Blessed are the dead, that lie in The Lord.4

Family with

Matthew Farndale b. 30 Sep 1793, d. 8 Aug 1884
Children
ChartsPedigree Chart for Robert Mote
Descendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Last Edited30 Jan 2015

Citations

  1. [S192] The Farndale Directory, online http://www.farndalefamily.co.uk, Volume 2, Page 36.
  2. [S192] The Farndale Directory, online http://www.farndalefamily.co.uk, Volume 2, Page 37.
  3. [S999] Trove, online http://trove.nla.gov.au
  4. [S192] The Farndale Directory, online http://www.farndalefamily.co.uk, Volume 2, Page 35.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Mary Ann Farndale

F, #71, b. 1 April 1831, d. 20 January 1923
Mary Ann Martin (née Farndale)
FatherMatthew Farndale b. 30 Sep 1793, d. 8 Aug 1884
MotherHannah Thompson b. 11 Oct 1807, d. 9 Dec 1892
Relationships2nd great-grandmother of Robert Mote
7th great-granddaughter of Nicholas Farndaile

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1 April 1831Mary Ann Farndale was born on Friday, 1 April 1831 at Kilton, Yorkshire, England.
She was the daughter of Matthew Farndale and Hannah Thompson.
Birth6 April 1831Mary Ann Farndale was born on Wednesday, 6 April 1831 at Brotton, Yorkshire, England.1
Marriagecirca September 1852Mary Ann was married to William John Martin, son of John Martin and Susanna Robinson, circa September 1852 at Hensington, London, England.2,3
Marriage30 September 1897Mary Ann Farndale witnessed the marriage of William John Matthew Martin and Irene Erlandson on 30 September 1897 at Colac, VIC, Australia; by Rev. Robert Brown.3
Death20 January 1923Mary Ann Farndale died on Saturday, 20 January 1923 at "Kilton", Camperdown, VIC, Australia, at age 91.
Burial22 January 1923She was buried on 22 January 1923 at Warncoort, VIC, Australia.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1852As of circa September 1852, her married name was Martin.

Voyages

DateDetails
8 October 1852Mary Ann Farndale was a passenger aboard The Ship Argo which sailed from Liverpool, Lancashire, England, on Friday, 8 October 1852 and arrived in Melbourne, Australia on 19th January 1853 after a journey of 103 days. The Master was Samuel Macodock and there was a total of 242 passengers aboard.4

Census Entries

Census DatePlaceDetails
1841Kilton, Yorkshire, EnglandMary Ann Farndale appeared on the census of 1841 at Kilton, Yorkshire, England; and is listed as 10 years of age.1
1851Hallgarth, Kildale, Yorkshire, EnglandShe appeared on the census of 1851 at Hallgarth, Kildale, Yorkshire, England; and is listed as 19 years of age and unmarried.4

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
The Camperdown Chronicle, Camperdown, VIC, Australia23 January 1923Mary Ann Farndale was mentioned in an article in The Camperdown Chronicle, Camperdown, VIC, Australia, on Tuesday, 23 January 1923 as follows:

DEATH.
MARTIN.-At the home of her daughter. Mrs. Aspland, Hopetoun street Camperdown. on January 20th, 1923. Mary Ann, widow of the late William Martin. formerly of Hawthorn. Birregurra and Newton, Geelong, and elder daughter of the late Matthew and Hannah Farndale, aged 92 years.5

Family with

William John Martin b. 5 May 1829, d. 26 May 1888
Children
ChartsPedigree Chart for Robert Mote
Descendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Descendant Chart - Thomas Martin
Last Edited7 Apr 2013

Citations

  1. [S192] The Farndale Directory, online http://www.farndalefamily.co.uk, Volume 3, Page 53.
  2. [S192] The Farndale Directory, online http://www.farndalefamily.co.uk, Volume 3, Page 54.
  3. [S320] The Martin/Bird Families, online Web address nolonger valid --http://www.birdsinthetree.com
  4. [S192] The Farndale Directory, online http://www.farndalefamily.co.uk, Volume 2, Page 37.
  5. [S999] Trove, online http://trove.nla.gov.au

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

William John Martin

M, #72, b. 5 May 1829, d. 26 May 1888
William John Martin
FatherJohn Martin b. 1788
MotherSusanna Robinson
Relationship2nd great-grandfather of Robert Mote

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth5 May 1829William John Martin was born on Tuesday, 5 May 1829 at Kildale, Yorkshire, England.
He was the son of John Martin and Susanna Robinson.
Baptism31 May 1829William John Martin was baptized on Sunday, 31 May 1829 at Kildale, Yorkshire.1
Marriagecirca September 1852William John was married to Mary Ann Farndale, daughter of Matthew Farndale and Hannah Thompson, circa September 1852 at Hensington, London, England.2,1
Death26 May 1888William John Martin died on Saturday, 26 May 1888 at "Hawthorne", Birregurra, VIC, Australia, at age 59.
BurialHe was buried at Warncoort, VIC, Australia.

Voyages

DateDetails
8 October 1852William John Martin was a passenger aboard The Ship Argo which sailed from Liverpool, Lancashire, England, on Friday, 8 October 1852 and arrived in Melbourne, Australia on 19th January 1853 after a journey of 103 days. The Master was Samuel Macodock and there was a total of 242 passengers aboard.3

Family with

Mary Ann Farndale b. 1 Apr 1831, d. 20 Jan 1923
Children
ChartsPedigree Chart for Robert Mote
Descendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Descendant Chart - Thomas Martin
Last Edited10 Oct 2011

Citations

  1. [S320] The Martin/Bird Families, online Web address nolonger valid --http://www.birdsinthetree.com
  2. [S192] The Farndale Directory, online http://www.farndalefamily.co.uk, Volume 3, Page 54.
  3. [S192] The Farndale Directory, online http://www.farndalefamily.co.uk, Volume 2, Page 37.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Elizabeth Clarissa Teresa Martin

F, #73, b. 19 December 1853, d. 26 June 1946
Elizabeth Clarissa Teresa Aspland (née Martin)
FatherWilliam John Martin b. 5 May 1829, d. 26 May 1888
MotherMary Ann Farndale b. 1 Apr 1831, d. 20 Jan 1923
RelationshipsGreat-grandmother of Robert Mote
8th great-granddaughter of Nicholas Farndaile

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth19 December 1853Elizabeth Clarissa Teresa Martin was born on Monday, 19 December 1853 at Colac, VIC, Australia.
She was the daughter of William John Martin and Mary Ann Farndale.
Marriage30 August 1876Elizabeth Clarissa Teresa was married to William Middleton Aspland, son of James Aspland and Eliza Poole, on Wednesday, 30 August 1876 at Birregurra, VIC, Australia.
Marriage30 September 1897Elizabeth Clarissa Teresa Martin witnessed the marriage of William John Matthew Martin and Irene Erlandson on 30 September 1897 at Colac, VIC; by Rev. Robert Brown.1
Death26 June 1946Elizabeth Clarissa Teresa Martin died on Wednesday, 26 June 1946 at Cobden, VIC, Australia, at age 92; (I am uncertain of this date of death. It may be 25 or 26.)2

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1876As of 30 August 1876, her married name was Aspland.

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
the Camperdown Chronicle, Camperdown, VIC, Australia17 November 1883Elizabeth Clarissa Teresa Martin was mentioned in an article in the Camperdown Chronicle, Camperdown, VIC, Australia, on Saturday, 17 November 1883 as follows:

We learn that Mr. Wm. Aspland has taken the Temperance Hotel, and intends to open it for the accommodation of the public from this date. Mr. Aspland is well and favourably known in the district; tho building has been thoroughly renovated and is now roomy and convenient; and Mrs. Aspland's management will be a sufficient guarantee as to the efficient and correct conducting of the establishment. A house of this kind was wanted in the town - witness the late show time.
The Argus, Melbourne, VIC, Australia26 June 1946She was mentioned in an article in The Argus, Melbourne, VIC, Australia, on Wednesday, 26 June 1946 as follows:

DEATHS

........ ASPLAND.-On June 25. at the residence of her daughter (Mrs. Woodmason), Grange, Cobden. Elizabeth Clarissa, eldest daughter of the late William and Mary Anne Martin, of Birregurra, beloved wife of William Aspland and loving mother of Percy, Ethel, Nellie, Hilda, Herbert. Ada, Leslie, Clarice, and Doris, aged 92 years. -The long day closes. .......3

the Camperdown Chronicle, Camperdown, VIC, Australia2 July 1946She had an obituary appear in the Camperdown Chronicle, Camperdown, VIC, Australia, on Tuesday, 2 July 1946 as follows:

OBITUARY
MRS. E C. ASPLAND ONE of Camperdown's oldest and most respected residents. in the person of Mrs. Elizabeth Clarissa Aspland, passed away on Tuesday last at the residence of her son-in-law, Mr A. Woodmason, "The Grange," Cobden. after a lengthy illness. The late Mrs. Apland had reached the age of 92 years and was the daughter of the late Mr and Mrs. William Martin of Birregurra, and was born at Colac. Her late husbanad. Mr. William Aspland, died 38 years ago. She arrved in Camper down 74 years ago, being em ployed in the drapery depart ment of a general store owned by her uncle, Mr. Darby in premises on the site now occupied by Pirone and Pitcher. Her memory went back to the days when the blacks held corroborees in Wa?s paddock between the present butter factory and the town. She was a devoted, life-long member of the Methodist Church and took a tnirsinre in its activities and ne sutnes bre was one or the Unra genretr srn ia reach an Savantteu age. I ri mother atlnedan l9years ne? gran ather 91 years. one sister is in her nineties. an three his reas andF a brother are over P2 years of age- She leaves a family of three sons and six daughters. who are Percy, Herbert, Les,
(The mess at the end of the obituary is caused by bad fading of the copy of the newspaper being scanned.)3
the Camperdown Chronical, Camperdown, VIC, Australia24 June 1948She was mentioned in an article in the Camperdown Chronical, Camperdown, VIC, Australia, on Thursday, 24 June 1948 as follows:

IN MEMORIAM

ASPLAND.-
- In loving memory of our dear mother and grandmother, who passed away, at Cobden June 25. 1946, dear mother of Ada (Mrs. Campbell), mother-in-law of Robert, loving grandma of Bill, Lindsay, Alfred, Reg, and Jean. "In silence we remember."3

Family with

William Middleton Aspland b. 29 Mar 1852, d. 11 Jul 1908
Children
ChartsA Timeline of Robert Mote's Ancestors
Pedigree Chart for Robert Mote
Descendant Chart - Allexsander Aspland
Descendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Descendant Chart - Thomas Martin
Last Edited25 Feb 2014

Citations

  1. [S320] The Martin/Bird Families, online Web address nolonger valid --http://www.birdsinthetree.com
  2. [S41] Index of Deaths in Victoria, Vic Deaths 1921-85, Registration Number: 18328.
  3. [S999] Trove, online http://trove.nla.gov.au

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

William Middleton Aspland

M, #74, b. 29 March 1852, d. 11 July 1908
William Middleton Aspland
FatherJames Aspland b. 26 Apr 1825, d. 14 Feb 1914
MotherEliza Poole b. 1827, d. Sep 1885
RelationshipsGreat-grandfather of Robert Mote
4th great-grandson of Allexsander Aspland

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth29 March 1852William Middleton Aspland was born on Monday, 29 March 1852 at Bridge Road, Ely, Cambridgeshire, England. His mother Eliza provided the information for the Birth Certificate on 7 May 1852 and signed it with her mark, so apparently was unable to write.1
He was the son of James Aspland and Eliza Poole.
Marriage30 August 1876William Middleton was married to Elizabeth Clarissa Teresa Martin, daughter of William John Martin and Mary Ann Farndale, on Wednesday, 30 August 1876 at Birregurra, VIC, Australia.
Marriage30 September 1897William Middleton Aspland witnessed the marriage of William John Matthew Martin and Irene Erlandson on 30 September 1897 at Colac, VIC, Australia; by Rev. Robert Brown.2
Death11 July 1908William Middleton Aspland died on Saturday, 11 July 1908 at Camperdown, VIC, Australia, at age 56.

Voyages

DateDetails
25 April 1874William Middleton Aspland was a passenger aboard The Steam Ship Somersetshire which sailed from Plymouth, Devon, England, on Saturday, 25 April 1874 and arrived in Melbourne, VIC on 25 June 1874.

Census Entries

Census DatePlaceDetails
187114 Eden Street, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, EnglandWilliam Middleton Aspland appeared on the census of 1871 at 14 Eden Street, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England; He was a lodger at this address.3

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
the Camperdown Chronicle, Camperdown, VIC, Australia17 November 1883William Middleton Aspland was mentioned in an article in the Camperdown Chronicle, Camperdown, VIC, Australia, on Saturday, 17 November 1883 as follows:

We learn that Mr. Wm. Aspland has taken the Temperance Hotel, and intends to open it for the accommodation of the public from this date. Mr. Aspland is well and favourably known in the district; tho building has been thoroughly renovated and is now roomy and convenient; and Mrs. Aspland's management will be a sufficient guarantee as to the efficient and correct conducting of the establishment. A house of this kind was wanted in the town - witness the late show time.
the Camperdown Chronicle, Camperdown, VIC, Australia23 May 1885He was mentioned in an article in the Camperdown Chronicle, Camperdown, VIC, Australia, on Saturday, 23 May 1885 as follows:

A BOLT that was fortunately unattended with serious consequences occurred yesterday evening. Mr. Aspland was engaged removing furniture to his new residence, Cr??sy road, when the horse took fright at a bicyclist, and bolted in spite of the exertions of two men to hold it. It first of all came into contact with, a buggy and pair driven by Mr. Gibson, and capsized the trap. The animal then careered wildly up Manifold street, and turned down into Scott street, where it was subsequently caught. The contents of the waggonette were scattered abroad and somewhat damaged. Mr. Aspland, himself, was knocked down in his attempt to stay the progress of the animal, and dragged several yards. He was stunned and bruised by the fall.4

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
EducationWilliam Middleton Aspland spent his early years at the Ely Preparatory School and sang in the famous Ely Cathedral Choir as a tenor. However, he didn't like the lessons and stopped attending the school and choir.
Occupation1871He was a French Polisher in 1871.3
OccupationHe was a cabinet maker.

OccupationHe was a house painter.

Family with

Elizabeth Clarissa Teresa Martin b. 19 Dec 1853, d. 26 Jun 1946
Children
ChartsA Timeline of Robert Mote's Ancestors
Pedigree Chart for Robert Mote
Descendant Chart - Allexsander Aspland
Descendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Descendant Chart - Thomas Martin
Last Edited4 Feb 2014

Citations

  1. [S584] UK BDMs, online various, Birth 1852 Q2 Ely 3b 539.
  2. [S320] The Martin/Bird Families, online Web address nolonger valid --http://www.birdsinthetree.com
  3. [S587] 1871 Cambridgeshire Census, online www.thegenealogist.co.uk.
  4. [S999] Trove, online http://trove.nla.gov.au

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Leslie James Aspland

M, #75, b. 9 April 1890, d. 15 July 1987
Leslie James Aspland
FatherWilliam Middleton Aspland b. 29 Mar 1852, d. 11 Jul 1908
MotherElizabeth Clarissa Teresa Martin b. 19 Dec 1853, d. 26 Jun 1946
RelationshipsGrandfather of Robert Mote
5th great-grandson of Allexsander Aspland
9th great-grandson of Nicholas Farndaile

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth9 April 1890Leslie James Aspland was born on Wednesday, 9 April 1890 at Camperdown, VIC, Australia.
He was the son of William Middleton Aspland and Elizabeth Clarissa Teresa Martin.
Marriage30 September 1897Leslie James Aspland witnessed the marriage of William John Matthew Martin and Irene Erlandson on 30 September 1897 at Colac, VIC, Australia; by Rev. Robert Brown.1
Marriage24 July 1916Leslie James Aspland was married to Phyllis Nellie Mutch, daughter of Robert Mutch and Louisa Loiterton, on Monday, 24 July 1916 at Cootamundra, NSW, Australia.
Divorce1947Leslie James Aspland and Phyllis Nellie Aspland were divorced in 1947.2
Death15 July 1987Leslie James Aspland died on Wednesday, 15 July 1987 at Young, NSW, Australia, at age 97.

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
The Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, Australia28 July 1916Leslie James Aspland was mentioned in an article in The Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, Australia, on Friday, 28 July 1916 as follows:

WEDDING BELLS.

Despite the scarcity of flowers at present, the surroundings of the pulpit in the Methodist Church were prettily decorated for the wedding, on Monday evening of Phyllis Nellie, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Mutch, of Cootamundra, and Leslie James, son of the late William Middleton and Mrs. Aspland, of Camperdown, Victoria. The Rev. H.E. Bellhouse officiated. The bride, who was given away by her father, wore a costume of cream crepe de chine, the bodice being daintily trimmed with satin and pearls, and lined with pale pink lilies of the valley, and wore a veil over a wreath of orange Blossoms, also an aquamarine pendant, the gift of the bridegroom. The brides- maid, Miss Ethel Mutch, wore a frock of white coil, trimmed with shadow lace, and a cap of white tuile, lined with pale pink ninon and ninon roses, with black velvet streamers. She car- ried a bouquet of pale pink roses, and wore a cameo ring, the bridegroom's present. Mr. Ernest Thompson acted as best-man. Whilst the register was being signed Miss Laura Row rendered in pleasing style, the solo, 'Because.' During the service the congregation joined in the singing of the hymns, 'The voice that Breathed o'er Eden' and 'O, Perfect Love!' whilst as the bridal party left the church the organist, Mr. W. B. Breyley, played the 'Wedding March'. A reception was held at the residence of the bride's parents; and later the newly-married couple left by the express for Melbourne.3

The Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, Australia30 January 1918He was mentioned in an article in The Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, Australia, on Wednesday, 30 January 1918 as follows:

Youthful Burglars.

When Mr. Les. Aspland went to his business place on Monday morning he found the back door open, and things a bit topsy turvy, but a look over his stock revealed nothing amiss. A few shillings were gone from a cash box. The back window was broken, but the hole was only big enough to let a very small person through. The police took the matter up, and we under stand that two boys are to be dealt with.3

the Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, Australia6 August 1920He was mentioned in an article in the Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, Australia, on Friday, 6 August 1920 as follows:

CRUMBS

Mr. Les. Aspland, of Brawlin, reports getting an eagle hawk bigger than the one displayed in our window for a few days. Nine feet from tip to tip! It was a dead bird- had picked up some poison. Anything to beat this one?3

The Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, Australia18 February 1921He was mentioned in an article in The Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, Australia, on Friday, 18 February 1921 as follows:

QUARTER SESSIONS

(Continued from page 7) A 'SLEEPY' ACCUSED

Robert Gordon was called to answer a charge of stealing from person.
Accusod was on bail. When called he did not answer.
He was located, asleep, in the gallery, and when 'the police got him down they said he was under the influence.

His Honor asked the police to lock him up till 2 o 'clock.
Gordon was brought in again at 2 o 'clock, and Mr. Maxwell, who appeared for him, said he seemed well enough. Accused had been travelling all night, and was not physically fit (returned soldier), and had got excited.
The charge was that he had stolen £14 and a book, the property of George Henry Tilden, from the person, at or near Cootamundra.
Plea, not guilty.

Jury: W. Elliott, H. T. Merriman, Joseph Moore, T. Bannon, I. Brovman, L. J. Aspland, P. Reardon, John Scott, George Gill, M. B. Sutton, Maxwell J. Wilson, P. J. Bartley.
Several of the jurymen who had officiated in the Temora case were called, but requested by the C-P. to 'stand aside.'
Sergeant Macdonald deposed: On 21st December, at 8.15, I was on the Cootamundra station when the Albury mail arrived. Tilden, who was in a second class carriage, called me. Ac cused was lying down in the carriage, drunk, but seemed to know what was said.
Mr. Maxwell objected, as his client was at the time incapable.
Witness: He was not too drunk to know.
Mr. Maxwell: He was arrested for drunkenness. I can call evidence that he did not understand.

His Honor: It is no use objecting. The constable said he could hear and understand.
Witness admitted that accused was half drowsy.
Evidence admitted
Witness: Tilden said, 'l have been robbed of £15.' I said, ' Where did you miss it ?' He said, ''About Beth- ungra.' ' ' ' Whom do you .suspect? ' 'I don't know. It must have been some- one in the carriage." We shook accused up and said we would search him. Ar- rested him. He was sober enough to walk along the platform. Sergeant Jeffrey handed me £7 in notes and some silver which he took out of accused's hip pocket. I said, 'How much did you have?' He said, 'About £8.' From the right side pocket we took two £5 notes and four £1 notes. I said, 'There are more notes here- What have you got altogether. ' ' He said. 'About £12.' I said, 'You have got. 'about £20 altogether.' He made no reply. On the following morning I said '.'You were a bit drunk last night. How much did you have on you last night? ' ' He, said, 'About £21.' I said, 'Where did you get it!' He said, 'I sold some furniture in Melbourne, and had a few pounds be sides. I found a receipt for £8, and asked did he pay it out of the £24. 'He said yes. He further said the money got separated in his pockets, but it was all his own. I produce the bank book. The bank book, has the name of Tilden in t'

By Mr. Maxwell: There were six or severn passengers. Only searched accused.

Tilden, a laborer at Beveridge's, be tween Gundagai and Wagga, deposed., that he was travelling to Goulburn. Waa drunk when he got in the train. Had £14 on him, including two £5 notes. Put it in the bank book produced, and put the book in his inside breast pocket. This chap was next to him all the time and offered him a drink. Witness was skylarking. When he missed the money he said he would give them all in charge at Cootamundra. A man named Morris said he would call the police if witness did not.
His Honor: Nice ,company travelling! Was the skylarking all in fun?
Witness: Yes. When I took the mouthful of spirits I spat it over him.
Didn't the railway officials try and put you out for being drunk ?
No.
They should have.
By Mr. Maxwell: Anyone could have seen the book sticking out of the top of my pocket. I came to Wagga with a cheque of £38. Spent a good bit Put £10 in the bank. Spent about £12 Gave a good bit to my grandchildren. It could not have fallen on the floor while I was flopping about.

Daniel Morris, lineman on the rail way deposed to Tilden pulling his money out, and witness told him to put it back and not be silly. Accused and Tilden were falling about on one an other. Drink was going round. No one sat next to Tilden but accused.
By Mr. Maxwell: I called tho police at Cootamundra. Tilden fell out of the carriage at Junee and I put him back. I did not have any of the liquor. Neither did Tilden. Tilden got in drunk at Wagga. I joined the train at Culcairn- I was not searched by the police but was willing to be.
Sergt. Jeffrey: The Bethungra station- master handed me Tilden's bank book.

Accused deposed: I live in Victoria. Came back in 1919. Was discharged as medically unfit, due to wounds. Produce the discharge.
Mr. Maxwell: It reads on active service three years. Discharge not due to misconduct.
Continuing: On 17th December I had about £32 on me. Went to see my mother at Milgrove, and sent £3 to my wife. Leaving Melbourne had about £21. At Wagga I was getting towards drunk. Someone gave me a dinner the other side of Junee. Remember nothing after that till I was at the police station. Have never been in trouble before. Sold my furniture to go and live in Sydney.
By Mr. Mason: Got the furniture from the Repatriation. Have arranged for the payment of the balance due, about £21. Thought I had the right to sell it and put the money in my pocket. Have now to pay it at £1 a week.
To Mr. Maxwell: I received three £5 notes and six £1 notes for the fur- niture. By Mr. Mason: If Mr. Shannon said he paid me one £10 note, one £5 note, and six £1 notes, he would be wrong
The jury returned a verdict of not guilty. '
Accused was discharged, and his Honor directed the money to be held to give an opportunity to apply for it.3



the Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, Australia26 September 1921He was mentioned in an article in the Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, Australia, on Monday, 26 September 1921 as follows:

PERSONAL

The death occurred on Friday night last in Wagga District Hospital, of Mr. James Foley, at the age of 61.

It is stated that the A.L.P. executive intends to ask the Labor party to make further appointments to the Upper House. What!

Congratulations, to a Cootamundra native who has beeome an L.L.B., and is now practising as a barrister in Ade laide. We refer to Mr. E. J. C. Hogan, son of Mr. and Mrs. Mat. Hogan, who will be well remembered.

Mr. L J. Aspland, late of Brawlin, writes from ''Kiiton,'' Hopetown street, Camperdown, Victoria, to say that he managed to get down there in time to go to bed with the 'flu, but is now on the mend. Our fellow sumpathy! Most of us had an attack of it, and can feel sorry for one another!

In appointing Mr. J. Simpson, of Cootamundra, secretary of the newly formed Southera Districts Hospital As sociation, the delegates picked one who should suit admirably. For one reason, Mr. Simpson visits every centre in the south once a month in his ordinary business capacity, as representative of a Sydney firm.3

the Young Witness, Young, NSW, Australia20 May 1922He was mentioned in an article in the Young Witness, Young, NSW, Australia, on Saturday, 20 May 1922 as follows:

PUBLIC NOTICES

_______________

For a Good Haircut or Shave go to LES ASPLAND.3


the Young Witness, Young, NSW, Australia23 May 1922He was mentioned in an article in the Young Witness, Young, NSW, Australia, on Tuesday, 23 May 1922 as follows:

Advertising

.........
Les Aspland for all Smokers' Requirements.
.......................3

the Daily Witness, Young, NSW, Australia16 November 1923He was mentioned in an article in the Daily Witness, Young, NSW, Australia, on Friday, 16 November 1923 as follows:

ADVERTISING

.........................
WANTED KNOWN!

LES ASPLAND

Has secured the services of Mr. JOE GARRY, who is known far and wide as a FIRST CLASS TRADESMAN, and new and old clients can rely on first class atten tion. Three chairs-No Waiting. Our Saloon has a reputation second to none for cleanliness and civility. If we please you tell your friends ----- if not tell us.

.........................
Just arrived --- Indent of Bengall Razors --- all guaranteed. LES ASPLAND.

.........................
LES ASPLAND'S Saloon has reputation second to none for Cleanliness and Civility.

.........................
See Pipe Display at Les Aspland's. Hundreds to choose from.

.........................3

The Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, Australia18 December 1931He was mentioned in an article in The Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, Australia, on Friday, 18 December 1931 as follows:

TOBACCONIST ROBBED

YOUNG, Friday.

Thieves at night stole good? valued at £50, mostly tobacco and cigarettes, from L. Aspland's hairdressing saloon.3

the Young Witness, Young, NSW, Australiacirca 16 July 1987He had an obituary appear in the Young Witness, Young, NSW, Australia, circa 16 July 1987 as follows:
One of the district's oldest and likeable residents passed away last month.
He was Leslie James Aspland better known as Les, to his many friends.
He was born at Camperdown in Victoria on APRIL 9th, 1890 and passed away in July at 97 years of age.
After working as a painter with his Father and Brother, Les came to Cootamundra around 1910 to act as best man at a wedding in town, and liked Cootamundra, so he stayed and secured a job as a coach painter.
While in Cootamundra he married Phyllis Mutch, and purchased a barbers shop, learned the trade and conducted this business until he purchased a 550 acre farm near Brawlin.
After 3 years on the farm he came to Young in 1921 and opened a barbers' shop on the present site of COLES store in Boorowa Street.
He later moved into the Great Eastern Hotel building, (now the Cherry Blossom Florist) and continued his business until 1954.
He had many friends who used to call into his shop just to say hello and have a yarn.
One of his closest friends was the late Sid Briggs who also conducted a hairdressing business in the town at the same time. They shared many hours together in their later years swapping stories and recalling their early days. Some recollections at the time were;
- Customers paying 6d for a shave, and 9d for a haircut.
- A 2oz. packet of tobacco was 9d.
- A packet of cigarettes was 3d , or 5 packets for one shilling.
Les had a liking for gardening and this hobby became part of his business, as he used to sell many of the plants he grew through his barbers shop. This hobby filled many happy hours when he retired from business.
He had a capacity for making friends, and many of these friendships he maintained by writing, and other means, almost until the day he passed away.
At 96 years of age he must have been one of the oldest to receive a Citizenship Award at the Australia Day Celebrations.
His "CERTIFICATE OF APPRECIATION" hung proudly in his room at Mount St. Joseph's Home where he was very well liked and respected, by those who came in contact with him.
Les and his wife, who predeceased him, had four children ;
Gwen Brown (Young)
Audrey Mote (Bowral)
Mona Dwyer (Young)
and son Raymond (Mick) of (Young)

A good innings by a fine man.

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
PhotoThe home of Les and Phyllis Aspland.
Photocirca 1935Leslie James Aspland was in the photograph taken circa 1935.
Anecdote1981Autobiographical note written by Les Aspland circa 1981 when he was 91 years old.

My family consisted of Mum and Dad, Perce, Nell, Ethel, Hilda, Bert, Ada, Clarice, Dorrie and myself.

Mum had very little to feed the family, but we were all fed well. At meal times there was no talking unless it was from Mum or Dad. There was all the old style cooking - stews, puddings and plenty of meat which was cheap then.

Perce was a cabinet maker and upholsterer. Ethel was a governess, Nell in a shop, Hilda in a drapers shop, Bert a house painter with Dad, Ada in a baker's shop, Clarice a nurse girl and Dorrie in a drapery shop.

We had a big tub for a bath, no shower in those days, and heated the water on the stove. I belonged to a bike club but the others were not involved in any sport. Hilda was learning singing and sang very well. I was at all their weddings and got bilious at every one of them, except at my own wedding. Nervous attacks!

One of my earliest memories was when I was 5 years old and my father was a paper hanger and house painter working out at Cobden. A man at Cobden had a small piebald pony, and he asked DAD (William) if he would bring it into Camperdown behind his wagon. It duly arrived, and I went out into the yard to see it, and DAD put me on it, and it raced around the back yard and I sat on it till it ran under the clothes line which caught me under the neck and I thought it had cut my head off.

We lived about 100 yards from the school. When I was 6 years old my sister took me to school, but as soon as the bell rang to go inside I used to run home. It took about two weeks to break me in.

As time went on, it was the usual thing for two boys to have a fight every day after school, and I eventually finished up with about six fights all of which I won, but they were all very gory. As soon as I was hit on the nose I used to bleed freely and there was blood everywhere. I have only had one fight since I left school, which I won, and that was in the Sunday School ground, and the Superintendent tried to stop it. They had cut down a pine tree in the yard and I picked up a limb and hit him on the legs and made him sick, and he went home, but that ended the fight and we both went into Sunday School covered in blood. Another chap took over and gave a speech about it and cautioned us.

[The following is an extract from a story Les told his grand daughter Louise Schuhkraft (nee Dwyer) Ed.]
"Les tells the story of one Friday evening of Mr. Birrell, the Headmaster of the Camperdown School where Les attended, and who lived next door to Les, went to Melbourne for the weekend and left three of his daughters at home. Les and Billy Hall, Maurie Bailey, and Alf Fringer, sneaked over to Mr. Birrell's home and legged each other up to the high windows to look at the girls chasing each other around the lounge room. Les legged the other three boys into the room but of course was then left stranded outside. A great time was had by all except Les. However on Monday morning at assembly Mr. Birrell called the four boys into his office. Maurie Bailey jumped out the window as he had a heart condition and knew that his Father would protect him from being caned, but Billy and Alf got 6 cuts and Les received 12 as he had been the one to leg them in.

On another occasion a Mr. McNicoll arrived for his first day of teaching at the school, and upon entering Les's class room, stated to his pupils that he operated on one system only and that was discipline; discipline; discipline; Les turned to the boy next to him and whispered, "Gee this is going to be rough" and was immediately called to the front of the classroom and caned. However the following day Mr. McNicoll must have regretted his hasty decision as he gave Les all the good jobs to do. After this a mutual liking sprang, and later Les and his sister corresponded with Mr. McNicoll. This gentleman went on to become a politician and eventually the Administrator Of New Guinea."

LES treasured these letters that he received from his old school teacher and kept them for many years, in fact it was for 74 years. When going through his things he decided to send one of the letters to his son David McNicoll. He did this and received the following reply;
               
BOX 4088, SYDNEY
               JAN. 12
DEAR MR.ASPLAND,
               What a wonderful surprise to be sent a 74- year- old letter from my father. I found it most interesting, and have sent a copy to my eldest brother, who completed a biography of my Father last year. My Father certainly had a varied career - Teacher - Soldier - Politician - and finally Administrator Of New Guinea.

We were very proud of him.

I wish you many more years of health and happiness.

Yours sincerely,

DAVID McNICOLL.



Now back to Les's own words.

Only once was I roused on by Dad. I met him down the street on Christmas Eve with his foreman, they were both drunk and I said to him, "go home you silly fool". As he turned towards me I ran up a lane into the backyard of a grocer's shop and hid in a big box till I thought I was safe. When I got home at 10 o'clock Mum was waiting at the front gate and told me to sneak in as Dad was very annoyed with me. So, I sure was quiet. I got up early the next morning and went down to a mate until I thought Dad had gone down the street. But, when I went home he was just coming out of the gate and said, "don't you ever speak to me like that again." I was quite happy with this outcome.

Dad used to buy a pig at the saleyards and get a man to cut it up. On one occasion I was helping bring it home with a rope on its leg when, a quarter of a mile from home the rope came off. It was nearly dark and we had quite a job catching it and getting it home.

I left school at the age of thirteen (in some letters he says twelve Ed.) years on a Friday with William Fisher (who was later to marry my sister Ada), and we were both apprenticed on the Monday for seven years, with Walls and Horne; I as a Coach Painter and Bill on the Woodwork, as they were Carriage Builders and also Undertakers. I stayed there several years during which time I always drove the pair of horses in the Hearse, and later when the boss was on holidays or sick, I conducted the funerals, some of which were very funny as we hired horses from the livery stables and at times got one that would jib and it was an awkward position to be in, and it happened four times to me.

We had a very big area to cover, up to 50 miles on one occasion. About 15 miles out we had to go down a very steep hill, but half way down we had to turn into the gate to go to the house and all was well but, when we came out as soon as we struck the hill one horse jibbed, and no effort could get them to go. Another chap was the driver that day, and I was conducting. The Carriage following had two horses so we changed over, and when the funeral topped the hill my mate belted them all the way at a gallop, and I made it in time for the burial.

On one occasion when my boss was in Melbourne I conducted a funeral of an old lady, very thin, about 82 years old, and her husband was about the same build. I had been out to measure her, and they made the coffin, and the next day I went to conduct the funeral. In those days a fair amount of liquor was taken by some of the mourners, and I asked the husband if he wanted any particular people to carry the coffin, and he asked how many I wanted. I said," sometimes they have six, and sometimes four " and he said, " six be buggered, you and I can carry her, she's as light as a feather." He was well under the grog so I got four. I could write a book on my experiences at funerals.

A few days after my father died my boss and I went to lift a woman into her coffin and I let go and fainted, and came to on the floor with the nurse bathing my head.

Another time we went to Darlington and there was a mouse plague on and all harness was put on wires out of reach, and when we got there the mourners were sitting around a table with a kerosene tin on the floor at the end, and on the table they had a board with cheese on the end. The board was fixed so it would tilt, and the mice were in the tin of water in hundreds. In the night my mate had his moustache half eaten off.

When I was about 14 years old I used to go out shooting rabbits that were very plentiful at the time and sell them for sixpence a pair and made good money for the half day holiday.

I left Walls & Thorne after three years and went to work in Terang, fourteen miles from Camperdown, for A J Thomas the leading carriage builders of Victoria. They had a very big staff and used to win every year at the Melbourne Show in those years. A year later I switched over to house painting in Terang for Clarke Bros. I rode my push bike from Camperdown to Terang and back each day for the two years I worked with the two companies, and was never late but often wet through.

I bought a block of land opposite my mother's place in Hopetoun Street for £50 and when I was 19 years old I got two weeks off from Clarke Bros. to put up the frame of a new house with Maurice McMahon and Boyle. Maurice was paid £3 per week to build the house and Boyle £2-8-0. The house cost £208. I never lived in it but rented it out. I later sold it to my sister Ada. When I later built a home in Young, I used the same design as that I had built in Camperdown.

I had worked as a house painter for a man named Hugh Cummins. The manager of the Bank in Camperdown owned two houses in Gippsland and he wanted the boss to go down and paint them. The boss took me with him so we went on the train and stayed the night in Melbourne, and that night we went to see Sinbad The Sailor, and next morning we caught the Cobb & Co. Coach at Dandenong for Toora.

We boarded with a man and wife with two daughters about my age and I fell in love with the younger one, and for a long time after I went back home we wrote regularly, but I met another girl, and somehow we parted. I had letters from her, and her mother wrote and asked me to make it up as Phyllis was fretting over it. Even to-day I feel sorry it turned out that way, as she was a lovely girl. Many years later I had afternoon tea with her sister, but I never saw Phyl. again.

About a year after I started with Clarke Bros., they took on a contract to paint Danedite Homestead, which was being renovated for Marion Manifold's wedding (Sir Chester's sister, I think) to Captain Adams, a Sea Captain, and they got two carpenters out from England to build the new stables, all built of Jarra wood. Four stalls, a chauffeur's room, car room, a 20ft x 20ft all white tiled room for washing cars and buggies, and a feed room etc. to cost £10,000 ($20,000), a lot of money in those days. The stalls were boarded up 4ft, then lattice with 6 inch openings and all morticed in one another, and they were sure experts couldn't get a bit of putty in anywhere. Feed boxes of porcelain and the same with the automatic water drinkers.

I was still painting Danedite Homestead when I got two weeks holiday to come to NSW to be best man at my brother's wedding. (His brother Alfred Herbert Aspland, who married Minnie Knight in August 1914. Ed.) I met a girl I later married, and was offered a job as coach painter, so stayed at my sister's home in Cootamundra, that was in August 1914. My sister Hilda was Mrs. Lloyd Holmes.

When I left Victoria I was to return after two weeks as I had no idea of staying in NSW, so I had left everything behind including my sulky, two ponies, harness, saddles etc. I had to get my brother to sell everything.

After being in NSW a while, I bought a hairdressing business in Cootamundra with two barbers employed, so I set to learn the trade. After about two years I found one of the men to be a thief so sacked him, and carried on the shop for about 8 years and did well, but had got very sick and had to sell out. The doctor said I needed outside work. and so, on recovery, I bought 550 acres eight miles out at Brawlin, and had a new home built on it as I had sold my home in Cootamundra.

I bought 500 sheep and was a grazier for four years and eventually sold out.

I went to Grenfell to buy a Newsagency but although the two brothers had it for sale, when I got there one of them decided not to sell. I came back as far as Young and stayed the night, and met a man I knew from Cootamundra who was working at Young and boarding with a hairdresser who wanted to sell. I saw him the next morning and decided to buy it, and at one time was employing three barbers, and a girl in the shop. I had a very large stock of tobacco and cigarettes and all hairdressing and smokers' equipment, and carried on the business with the addition of seeds and plants for thirty five years, very successfully. I bought the shop in 1921 and sold out and retired in 1954

I have had a very good life and have enjoyed having a family of four; Gwen, Audrey, Mona, & Ray, and they have all been very good to me throughout my life, and I hope that they will have as good a life as I have had.

LIFE IS WHAT ONE MAKES IT.

YOURS SINCERELY,

LESLIE JAMES ASPLAND.

Photo9 April 1984He with his daughters Gwen and Mona on his 94th birthday taken 9 April 1984 at Young, NSW, Australia.

Family with

Phyllis Nellie Mutch b. 6 Jul 1896, d. 27 Jan 1948
Children
ChartsA Timeline of Robert Mote's Ancestors
Pedigree Chart for Robert Mote
Descendant Chart - Allexsander Aspland
Descendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Descendant Chart - Charles Loiterton
Descendant Chart - Thomas Martin
Descendant Chart - William Much
Descendant Chart - Stephen Oxford
Descendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Last Edited12 Jan 2015

Citations

  1. [S320] The Martin/Bird Families, online Web address nolonger valid --http://www.birdsinthetree.com
  2. [S999] Trove, online http://trove.nla.gov.au, The Sydney Morning Herald, Saturday 19 April 1947 Page 15.
  3. [S999] Trove, online http://trove.nla.gov.au

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Phyllis Nellie Mutch

F, #76, b. 6 July 1896, d. 27 January 1948
Phyllis Nellie Mutch
FatherRobert Mutch b. 17 Aug 1867, d. 23 Nov 1925
MotherLouisa Loiterton b. 20 Jun 1877, d. 29 Oct 1966
RelationshipsGrandmother of Robert Mote
4th great-granddaughter of William Much
4th great-granddaughter of Charles Loiterton
7th great-granddaughter of Thomas Sheather

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth6 July 1896Phyllis Nellie Mutch was born on Monday, 6 July 1896 at Parker Street, Cootamundra, NSW, Australia.
She was the daughter of Robert Mutch and Louisa Loiterton.
Marriage24 July 1916Phyllis Nellie Mutch was married to Leslie James Aspland, son of William Middleton Aspland and Elizabeth Clarissa Teresa Martin, on Monday, 24 July 1916 at Cootamundra, NSW, Australia.
Divorce1947Phyllis Nellie Aspland and Leslie James Aspland were divorced in 1947.1
Death27 January 1948Phyllis Nellie Mutch died on Tuesday, 27 January 1948 at Young, NSW, Australia, at age 51.
BurialJanuary 1948She was buried in January 1948 at the Methodist Cemetery, Young, NSW, Australia.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1916As of 24 July 1916, her married name was Aspland.

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
The Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, Australia28 July 1916Phyllis Nellie Mutch was mentioned in an article in The Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, Australia, on Friday, 28 July 1916 as follows:

WEDDING BELLS.

Despite the scarcity of flowers at present, the surroundings of the pulpit in the Methodist Church were prettily decorated for the wedding, on Monday evening of Phyllis Nellie, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Mutch, of Cootamundra, and Leslie James, son of the late William Middleton and Mrs. Aspland, of Camperdown, Victoria. The Rev. H.E. Bellhouse officiated. The bride, who was given away by her father, wore a costume of cream crepe de chine, the bodice being daintily trimmed with satin and pearls, and lined with pale pink lilies of the valley, and wore a veil over a wreath of orange Blossoms, also an aquamarine pendant, the gift of the bridegroom. The brides- maid, Miss Ethel Mutch, wore a frock of white coil, trimmed with shadow lace, and a cap of white tuile, lined with pale pink ninon and ninon roses, with black velvet streamers. She car- ried a bouquet of pale pink roses, and wore a cameo ring, the bridegroom's present. Mr. Ernest Thompson acted as best-man. Whilst the register was being signed Miss Laura Row rendered in pleasing style, the solo, 'Because.' During the service the congregation joined in the singing of the hymns, 'The voice that Breathed o'er Eden' and 'O, Perfect Love!' whilst as the bridal party left the church the organist, Mr. W. B. Breyley, played the 'Wedding March'. A reception was held at the residence of the bride's parents; and later the newly-married couple left by the express for Melbourne.2

the local paper at, Young, NSW, Australiacirca 28 January 1948She had an obituary appear in the local paper at, Young, NSW, Australia, circa 28 January 1948 as follows: The death occurred at her home 51 Nasmith St. on Tuesday last of Phyllis Nellie Aspland, at the age of 52.
Deceased was the daughter of Mrs. Mutch and the late Robert Mutch, and was born at Cootamundra.
She married Leslie James Aspland at Cootamundra in 1916, and he and 4 children survive. A son is Raymond of Young.
Daughters are : Gwendoline (Mrs. E. Brown) Young.
Audrey (Mrs. G. Mote) Bowral.
Mona - Young.

Mr. Jack Mutch of Auburn was a brother
Mr. Bert Mutch of Braidwood was a brother
Sisters -- Mrs. Elma Rigney (Balgowlah)
Mrs. Ethel Long (Cootamundra)

The remains were conveyed to the Methodist Church where Rev. L.A.R. Taylor conducted a service. As the coffin was being carried from the church it passed through a guard of honor composed of members of the Methodist Ladies' Guild. The interment took place at the Young cemetery, the family wreath being lowered with the remains.

Pallbearers were: Mr. Claude Long (brother-in-law)
Mr. Milton Mutch (cousin)
& Messrs. Mr. F. Carnley & Mr. Alex Murray.
H.R. Blackett & Son conducted the funeral arrangements.
The Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, Australia2 February 1948She was mentioned in an article in The Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, Australia, on Monday, 2 February 1948 as follows:

OBITUARY

MRS. PHYLLIS LES. ASPLAND

The death occurred at her home, of Phyllis Nellie Aspland, 48, daughter of Mrs. Mutch and the late Robert Mutch. Born at Cootamundra, she married Leslie James Aspland, at Cootamundra, in 1916, and he and four children survive. A son is Raymond, of Young.

Daughters are Gweneth, (Mrs. E. Brown), Young, Audrey (Mrs. B. Mote), Bowral, Mona (Young).

Mr. Jack Mutch, of Auburn is a brother, and sisters are Mrs. Elma Rigney (Balgowlah, Manly) and Mrs. Ethel Long (Cootamundra). A brother predeceased her.

The remains were conveyed to the Methodist Church, where the Rev. L. A. R. Taylor conducted the service.

The coffin passed through a guard of honor composed of members of the Methodist Ladies' Guild. The interment took place at the Young cemetery, the family wreath being lowered with the remains.

Pallbearers were Mr. Claude Long (brother-in-law), Mr. Milton Mutch (cousin), and Messrs. F. Carnley and Alex Murray.2



The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, NSW, Australia10 February 1948She was mentioned in an article in The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, NSW, Australia, on Tuesday, 10 February 1948 as follows:

DEATHS

.............
.............
ASPLAND, Phyllis Nellie - January 27 1948 at her residence 51 Nasmith Street Young Loved mother of Gwen (Mrs. E Brown) Audry (Mrs Mote) Mona and Raymond and beloved daughter of Mrs L Mutch and late Robert Mutch of Cootamundra aged 48 years.
........2

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
PhotoThe home of Les and Phyllis Aspland.
Anecdote1997Biographical note written by her daughter Audrey Mote
Phyllis was the first child born to Louisa and Robert Mutch of 44 Crown Street, Cootamundra. She was born on Monday 6 July 1896 at Parker Street, Cootamundra, and was registered by her father, Robert Mutch, a farmer of 28 years, on 20th August 1896. The witness was Mrs Sharp.
Phyllis eventually had two brothers, Bert and Jack, and two sisters, Ethel and Elma.
Nothing is known at present of her early school days up until her teens when she worked in the office of Attwood's shop at Cootamundra. I also seem to remember that she worked at some time as a milliner, making and decorating ladies' hats.
It was in her teens that she met my Dad, Leslie James Aspland, who had come up to Cootamundra from Camperdown in Victoria, to be best man at his brother Bert's wedding. Les was staying with his sister Hilda and her husband Lloyd Holmes.
Evidently Phyllis saw this nice looking young stranger in town, dressed to the nines in a double breasted navy suit and fur felt swedish style hat, and decided to get to know him. And according to Leslie she often went out of her way to do just that. Anyway it must have worked for both of them as they were married in the Methodist Church in Cootamundra on 24th JULY, 1916 and travelled to Victoria for their honeymoon. It was a Monday night when Phyllis Nellie Mutch and Leslie James Aspland were married by Rev. Bellhouse. The bride was given away by her father, and wore a pretty frock of white crepe-de-chene, the bodice being daintily trimmed with satin and pearls, and lined with pale pink ninon. She wore the customary wreath and veile.
Miss Ethel Mutch was bridesmaid; her dress was of white cotton voile, trimmed with shadow lace. She also wore a mob cap of white tulle, lined with pale pink ninon, ninon roses, and velvet streamers. The bridegroom's gift to the bridesmaid was a cameo ring. Mr. E. Thompson acted as best man. The bride's mother wore a black costume.
At the end of the ceremony, the bridal party and guests adjourned to the residence of the bride's parents, "Glenroy", Crown Street, Cootamundra, where the wedding breakfast was held.
Later in the evening, the happy couple left by the express train for Camperdown, Victoria, where the honeymoon was spent. The bride's travelling dress was a navy coat and skirt , and a violet hat.
The bride's gift to the bridegroom was a pair of silver sleeve links, and the bridegroom's gift to the bride being an aquamarine pendant.
They came back to Cootamundra and settled, and Lloyd Holmes lent Les £275 to purchase a barber's shop. He had this for about 3 years and suffered fainting spells (probably from too much standing) so the Doctor advised a change of work.
I can imagine it was an important decision for them, but they eventually decided to try the land, and bought 550 acres at Brawlin (just out of Coota.) The purchase price was £4,000 and they borrowed £500 so I imagine it was an important step for them to take. They built a new home on the land and were there for 4 years.
My Dad then decided that he would very much like to own a paper shop, and on hearing of one for sale at Queanbeyan for £800, he tried to talk my Mother into going to have a look at it, but she was very definite and wouldn't consider it, as she said it was too far away from home and family. Evidently my Mother must have considered Grenfell close enough as Dad went across by train to inspect a paper shop there, but by the time he got there it was withdrawn from sale.
On the way home he stayed at the Great Eastern Hotel at Young overnight, and the next morning met a friend from Coota. in the street who told him of a hairdressing business for sale. He must have contacted Mum and she said she would come to Young, so next day he went down and bought the business from Mr. Stan McKellar. He did very well in the business and carried a very large stock of tobacco, and sometimes on Saturdays I would go down and run the shop part for him. Customers from the hairdressing used to bring their ticket out to me and I would attend to them.
Sometimes to make extra money Dad would bundle up plants that he had grown at home and sell them at the shop. He had his regular customers and did quite well, but it was a lot of hard work, and each night he could be found out in the garden in the dark with a lantern, digging up and bundling his plants, ready for the next day. He often told Bob (my husband) and me that he had been sorry not to have had a paper shop, so I think that was a dream that he didn't fulfil.
When my Mother and Father decided to come to Young, Dad bought a block of land on the Burrowa Road, now known as 5 Whiteman Avenue. Mr. Vogt built the house in 1922 and in fact Dad told me that the night I was born he could remember sitting on the floor joists as the floor wasn't finished, and that was where he received the news that he had another daughter. My elder sister Gwen was born while my parents were at Cootamundra. I guess I was a disappointment for them as I suppose they badly wanted a son. However they were to have another daughter Mona, before they finally got their son Ray .
My Mother lead a fairly quiet life as she was mostly a home person. She belonged to the Methodist Ladies' Church Aid but she didn't go along often. Her interests were sewing and gardening and she always kept her family and the house spotless. She liked dressing nicely, but she didn't have a lot of money, so the dressmaking helped a lot. She was often frustrated because of the shortage of money, and Bob (Gordon) my husband used to help her as much as he could, if she wanted any furniture or goods that he sold, in the furniture shop he was in.
This shortage of money often caused arguments between my parents - they were both strong willed, and neither would give in during an argument. They were not very compatible as the years rolled on, and they very rarely did anything, or went anywhere together. They drifted apart, and one day without any warning, my Mother moved out with the two children, Mona and Ray. Gwen and I were married . She moved to a home at 51 Nasmith Street, Young, and took in girl boarders to make ends meet.
Of course it was a great shock to my Father to come home from work one night and instead of finding his dinner waiting for him, to find most of the house empty of furniture, and his family gone.
This led to a divorce, a divorce I don't think either of them wanted, but both being pig-headed they couldn't talk to one another and admit how they really felt. None of the family took sides.
Dad put some boarders in his house and continued to live there for a time, until Mona married, and she and Pat Dwyer moved in with him and stayed.
Mum always suffered from Hayfever and Varicose Veins, and her legs must have gotten so bad that she went to Dr. Stocks to have some treatment for them. I wasn't living at Young at this time, but I believe she was having injections for them, and shortly after became ill and confined to her bed. I can never understand why the Doctor didn't put her in hospital, but perhaps she wouldn't go and leave Mona and Ray on their own to look after the boarders. Perhaps they didn't realise how serious it was, as I know for myself I didn't, and I didn't know at the time the nature of her illness.
Bob and I and our 2 children Robert and Jan were living at Bowral at this time, and towards evening I had an urge to ring Mum to see how whe was. Having no phone, we put our kids in the car and drove to Bowral P.O. to ring up. I went in to ring while Bob and Robert and Jan waited in the car. I got through O.K. and Teddy Brown (my brother-in-law) answered and said, " just a minute, Dr. Stocks wants to speak to you. " He came on and told me that Mum had just died. She got out of bed and died from a clot. It was a terrible shock.
On the death certificate it says she died from;
1 a Coronary embolism
1b Hepatic thrombosis cause of death
11 Severe neurasthemia
2 a 40 mins.
b ?
11 1 month duration of last illness
3 DR. STOCKS
27th JANUARY, 1948.

My Dad was a total wreck emotionally at the funeral, who knows what thoughts were going through his head. He retired from business not long after and spent his time in his garden which he really enjoyed, and he often came to us for holidays at Bowral and later when we moved to Goulburn. Then at other times he would travel to Victoria to visit with his many relatives and he was always a good letter writer. Bob and I were always interested in photography and one time when Dad was staying with us Bob suggested to Dad to buy a camera to take photos on his travels. They went down to see Ian Steele a friend of Bob's, who owned a camera store and bought one. From then on he took many lovely colour slides of the various gardens that were open for inspection like " MILTON PARK " at Bowral. He was very proud of the collection that he acquired.
Dad went on to live another 39 years after Mum died. His later years were spent at Mount Saint Joseph's Home, at Young, where he was very happy and very well cared for. He used to write to us every week until his eyesight failed, and then Bob & I made the decision to ring him every Sunday morning, and that continued until he died. He used to look forward to our calls, and was always waiting near the office. His health was very good, and right up until the end his memory was outstanding, even remembering things that we couldn't. He passed away quietly on 15th JULY, 1987, at the remarkable age of 97.

Family with

Leslie James Aspland b. 9 Apr 1890, d. 15 Jul 1987
Children
ChartsA Timeline of Robert Mote's Ancestors
Pedigree Chart for Robert Mote
Descendant Chart - Allexsander Aspland
Descendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Descendant Chart - Charles Loiterton
Descendant Chart - Thomas Martin
Descendant Chart - William Much
Descendant Chart - Stephen Oxford
Descendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Last Edited21 May 2016

Citations

  1. [S999] Trove, online http://trove.nla.gov.au, The Sydney Morning Herald, Saturday 19 April 1947 Page 15.
  2. [S999] Trove, online http://trove.nla.gov.au

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Clarice Gwendoline Aspland

F, #77, b. 14 May 1917, d. 11 October 2014
Clarice Gwendoline Brown (née Aspland)
FatherLeslie James Aspland b. 9 Apr 1890, d. 15 Jul 1987
MotherPhyllis Nellie Mutch b. 6 Jul 1896, d. 27 Jan 1948
RelationshipsAunt of Robert Mote
6th great-granddaughter of Allexsander Aspland
5th great-granddaughter of William Much
5th great-granddaughter of Charles Loiterton
8th great-granddaughter of Thomas Sheather
10th great-granddaughter of Nicholas Farndaile

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth14 May 1917Clarice Gwendoline Aspland was born on Monday, 14 May 1917 at Wallendoon Street, Cootamundra, NSW, Australia.
She was the daughter of Leslie James Aspland and Phyllis Nellie Mutch.
Marriage26 December 1934Clarice Gwendoline Aspland was married to Edmund Brown, son of John Lewis Brown and Alice Maud Jennings, on Wednesday, 26 December 1934 at Church of England, Young, NSW, Australia.
Death11 October 2014Clarice Gwendoline Brown died on Saturday, 11 October 2014 at Young, NSW, Australia, at age 97.
Cremation23 October 2014She was cremated on 23 October 2014 at Norwood Park Crematorium, Canberra, ACT, Australia.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Name VariationClarice Gwendoline Aspland was also known as Gwen.
Married Name1934As of 26 December 1934, her married name was Brown.

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
The Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, Australia7 January 1935Clarice Gwendoline Aspland was mentioned in an article in The Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, Australia, on Monday, 7 January 1935 as follows:

St. John's, Young, was the scene of an attractive wedding on Boxing Day, when Mr. Edmond Brown, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Brown, of Trafalgar Farm, was united to Miss Gwendoline Aspland, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Aspland, of Young, the Rev. Canon McKeown officiating. The future home of the happy couple will be at Young.1

Young, NSW, AustraliaMay 1997She had an article appear in Young, NSW, Australia, in May 1997 as follows:

Four Generations Together For Gwen Brown's 80th Birthday
     Family members spanning four generations converged on Young last Wednesday to celebrate Gwen Brown's 80th birthday.
     People travelled from Melbourne, Gosford, Cootamundra and from just down the road to share this special day with Gwen.
     Gwen was born in the small village of Brawlin, near Cootamundra.
     When she was four years old her family moved to Young where her parents established the family home in Whiteman Avenue.
     When she left school at 14 she began working at Gilpin's store in Young.
     On Boxing day in 1934 she married Ted Brown, who she has shared the last 63 years with.
     Their first home together was an original two roomed hut on Ted's family property, "Trafalgar", three miles from Young.
     Later they moved to a property near Back Creek Road where they started a farm.
     In 1956 the couple decided to leave the land and moved into Young to run a corner store where the Caltex service station is today, on the corner of Boorowa and Zouch Streets.
     During her time in Young, Gwen has been an active member of the community.
     She has been part of the Young Women's Bowling Club, Young Garden Club, Probus Club, Neighbourhood Watch, Tidy Towns, and the Young Veteran and Vintage Car Club.
     As well as all this, Gwen had the time to raise four daughters and enjoy watching 11 grand children and 16 great grand children grow.
local newspaper, Young, NSW, Australiacirca 26 December 2000She was mentioned in an article in local newspaper, Young, NSW, Australia, circa 26 December 2000 as follows:

Special Celebration For Boxing Day
     For most people, December 26 is Boxing Day, a day for watching the cricket and the start of the Sydney to Hobart yacht race.
     But in one home at the Young Retirement Village this Boxing Day, two people celebrated a marriage that has been going strong for 66 years.
     Ted and Gwen Brown have both spent their lives in Young, and have been together since their marriage at the Anglican Church by Reverand McKeown, in 1934.
     Ted remembers Young in 1925 when there were still gravel roads, as he used to deliver milk from his family's dairy.
     This year, their anniversary was acknowledged by means of transcript, received from Queen Elizabeth II, Australian Prime Minister John Howard, Australian Governor General Sir William Dean, and Federal Member for Hume, Alby Schultz.
     The Brown's, who have been at the retirement village for a little over a year now, celebrated their anniversary this year with friends and family.
     A family that is, by the way, quite large. The Brown's boast four daughters, 11 grandchildren, and 19 great grandchildren.
     The family is so large in fact that a tally had to be done to work out just how many there were.
     Gwen highlighted the importance of the family unit and patience to keeping a good marriage alive.
     "They're like birds in a nest, they all fly out sooner or later," Gwen said.
     Ted said the many years of marriage had certainly been hard work, but it was a very rewarding experience.

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
Anecdote1997Autobiographical note written by Gwen Brown

My memory takes me back to when I was four years old when my father took me on a horse up a hill on our property at Brawlin, to dig out rabbits. He was digging at a burrow when he said, "Oh, there are some baby rabbits in here", and of course I leaned over the hole to have a look, inquisitive like, just as he lifted the pick out of the hole and it hit me in the corner of my eye; I have the scar to this day. Dad (Les Aspland) was so upset and it was a wonder that he never fainted as he was good at that - even on the night that I was born, so he told me. Anyhow, he put me on the horse and quickly rode home.

My school days at Young Primary, after leaving Cootamundra at the age of four years, are memorable regards a ringworm I had once on the point of my nose when I was eight years old. The doctor prescribed black ointment to be put on it. I hated going to school. I was also made to wear a pair of shoes I disliked very much because they had a strap across the instep and very thick crepe soles.

My High School days were better as I loved sport and was always chosen in sports events. In 1928 I won a silver medal in the shape of a shield for running and I will always treasure it. I achieved the Intermediate Certificate in third year and left school at the age of fourteen.

I started work at O Gilpins store for a weekly wage of seven shillings and nine pence (79 cents) of which I gave my mother five shillings (50 cents). After working there for twelve months I left and went and worked for a Mr Wareham who owned the store named C.D.S. I never did ask what those letters stood for. My wage then was seventeen shillings and sixpence ($1.75) per week and I was still giving my mother five shillings per week. I thought I was made; I even bought a wardrobe and dressing table for my bedroom. When I got married my mother said, "You had better take that with you as you will need it". Even up to this day it causes a lot of laughs between our four daughters as, one day when they were young, they were playing hide and seek; one hid in the wardrobe and broke through the bottom of it.

I fell in love with my husband Ted Brown and we were married on 26th December 1934. We have four daughters and have had a very happy and interesting life together. We have just celebrated our 61 years of marriage. On our fortieth anniversary one of our grandsons asked his grandfather, "How do you live so long with one person?"; he made us a leather medal.

Ted, when we were married, was a dairyman on his father's dairy. We also had a poultry farm and when the girls were older we moved to town (Young) and bought a mixed business, stayed in that for eight and a half years (1956 - 1964) and then we retired. I now play bowls after giving up tennis and have achieved something that hasn't been done in the club for over twenty odd years. In 1994 I won the "Grand Slam" in our club (YWBC) Championships. Skipped the fours, triples and pairs then won the singles. I also helped win a pennant for the club the same year and was chosen by the council and tourism committees as "Sports Person of the Year". I was presented with an engraved silver tray of which I am very proud.

ChartsDescendant Chart - Allexsander Aspland
Descendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Descendant Chart - Charles Loiterton
Descendant Chart - Thomas Martin
Descendant Chart - William Much
Descendant Chart - Stephen Oxford
Descendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Last Edited28 Oct 2014

Citations

  1. [S999] Trove, online http://trove.nla.gov.au

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Raymond Robert William Aspland

M, #79, b. 24 May 1932, d. 24 April 2006
FatherLeslie James Aspland b. 9 Apr 1890, d. 15 Jul 1987
MotherPhyllis Nellie Mutch b. 6 Jul 1896, d. 27 Jan 1948
RelationshipsUncle of Robert Mote
6th great-grandson of Allexsander Aspland
5th great-grandson of William Much
5th great-grandson of Charles Loiterton
8th great-grandson of Thomas Sheather
10th great-grandson of Nicholas Farndaile

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth24 May 1932Raymond Robert William Aspland was born on Tuesday, 24 May 1932 at Young, NSW, Australia.
He was the son of Leslie James Aspland and Phyllis Nellie Mutch.
Marriage14 January 1984Raymond Robert William was married to Linda Mortloch on Saturday, 14 January 1984 at Uniting Church, Young, NSW, Australia.
Death24 April 2006Raymond Robert William Aspland died on Monday, 24 April 2006 at Budgewoi, NSW, Australia, at age 73.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
NicknameRaymond Robert William Aspland was often called Mick.
ChartsDescendant Chart - Allexsander Aspland
Descendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Descendant Chart - Charles Loiterton
Descendant Chart - Thomas Martin
Descendant Chart - William Much
Descendant Chart - Stephen Oxford
Descendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Last Edited17 Feb 2014

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Edmund Brown

M, #80, b. 29 December 1913, d. 7 June 2005
Edmund Brown
FatherJohn Lewis Brown b. 7 Jul 1876, d. 24 Aug 1958
MotherAlice Maud Jennings b. 4 Jul 1883, d. 31 Dec 1967

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth29 December 1913Edmund Brown was born on Monday, 29 December 1913 at Young, NSW, Australia.
He was the son of John Lewis Brown and Alice Maud Jennings.
Marriage26 December 1934Edmund Brown was married to Clarice Gwendoline Aspland, daughter of Leslie James Aspland and Phyllis Nellie Mutch, on Wednesday, 26 December 1934 at Church of England, Young, NSW, Australia.
Death7 June 2005Edmund Brown died on Tuesday, 7 June 2005 at Young, NSW, at age 91.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Name VariationEdmund Brown was also known as Ted.

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
The Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, Australia7 January 1935Edmund Brown was mentioned in an article in The Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, Australia, on Monday, 7 January 1935 as follows:

St. John's, Young, was the scene of an attractive wedding on Boxing Day, when Mr. Edmond Brown, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Brown, of Trafalgar Farm, was united to Miss Gwendoline Aspland, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Aspland, of Young, the Rev. Canon McKeown officiating. The future home of the happy couple will be at Young.1

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
PhotoEdmund Brown was in the photograph Ted Brown and his 1923 Canadian Buick, the only one of its type registered in Australia.
Anecdote2002A book on the Brown family (cost $34) has been produced by

Esme Ingram
17 Hill Road
Birrong NSW 2143

Phone:     02 9645 3997     
Mobile:     0421 051405.
ChartsDescendant Chart - Allexsander Aspland
Descendant Chart - Nicholas Farndaile
Descendant Chart - Charles Loiterton
Descendant Chart - Thomas Martin
Descendant Chart - William Much
Descendant Chart - Stephen Oxford
Descendant Chart - Thomas Sheather
Last Edited28 Feb 2014

Citations

  1. [S999] Trove, online http://trove.nla.gov.au

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.