Josiah George Swift Perks

M, #681, b. 22 January 1808, d. 1 May 1871
Josiah George Perks
Photograph provided by Peter Cribbin
FatherRichard Millington Perks b. 14 Jan 1770, d. 13 Oct 1842
MotherAnn Snape b. 1770, d. 25 Apr 1839
Relationship3rd great-grandfather of Robert Mote

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth22 January 1808Josiah George Swift Perks was born on Friday, 22 January 1808 at Cannon Street Meeting House - baptist, Birmingham, Warwickshire, EnglandG.1
He was the son of Richard Millington Perks and Ann Snape.
Baptism1808Josiah George Swift Perks was baptized in 1808 at Cannon Street Baptists, Birmingham, Warwickshire, EnglandG.2
Marriage12 March 1832He married Isabella Ann Shelbourne, daughter of John Shelburne and Ann Killroy, on Monday, 12 March 1832 at Place of Worship, Bathurst, NSW, AustraliaG, by John Espy Kearne, Chaplain, Church of England. They had to make a formal application to the Government for permission to marry by banns. The ceremony was conducted by John Espey Keane, Chaplain of the Church of England, Bathurst. At the time of their marriage George had been in the colony for five years and was 24 years of age. Isabella had been in the colony for two years and was 28 years old.
Death1 May 1871Josiah George Swift Perks died on Monday, 1 May 1871 at Burrowa, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 63. His death was registered at Burrowa on 29 May 1871.3,4
Burial2 May 1871He was buried by the undertaker, William Keating on 2 May 1871 at Langs Creek, NSW, AustraliaG.4

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
NicknameJosiah George Swift Perks was often called George.
Name VariationJosiah George Swift Perks was also known as George Swift Perks as mentioned in the newspaper account of his trial and some of his convict records.

Description

DateDescription
Josiah George Swift Perks was described as five feet five and a half inches tall, had a pale complexion, sandy hair and dark hazel eyes.

Criminal Record

DatePlaceDetails
22 July 1826Warwick Assizes, EnglandJosiah George Swift Perks was tried and sentenced, at the age of 18, to life imprisonment at the Warwick Assizes for larceny in a dwelling house. He had two previous convictions.
31 May 1835He received his certificate of freedom on 31 May 1835 after serving nine years of his Life Sentence. He was required to remain in the District of Bathurst.

Voyages

DateDetails
18 April 1827Josiah George Swift Perks was a convict aboard The Ship Marquis of Hastings which sailed from Portsmouth, Hampshire, EnglandG, on Wednesday, 18 April 1827 and arrived in Sydney Cove, NSW on 31 July 1827 with 168 male convicts. The Master was John Jeffrey and the Surgeon was Gilbert King.

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
the Warwick Advertiser, England29 July 1826Josiah George Swift Perks was mentioned in an article in the Warwick Advertiser, England, on Saturday, 29 July 1826 as follows: George Swift Perks, Isaac Swift and William Yendell were convicted of entering the dwelling house of Elizabeth Hanson in the daytime and stealing therefrom.5

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
Education1827The "Principal Superintendent of Convicts' Printed Indents" states that George had no religion and could neither read nor write. The muster aboard the Marquis of Hastings (2) of 1st August 1827 by the Colonial Secretary states that he was Protestant and could read and write.
Occupation1828Josiah George Swift Perks was assigned to Reverend Thomas Hassall in 1828 at Macquarie Grove, NSW, AustraliaG, as a Blacksmith as he had been a steel toymaker in England.
Occupation1829Josiah George Swift Perks was employed by Reverend Thomas Hassall as a Blacksmith in 1829 at "Denbigh", Cobbitty, NSW, AustraliaG.
Anecdote1832Josiah George Swift Perks was the subject of a letter. In 1832 Richard Millington Perks and his wife Ann, after receiving a letter from their son Josiah George Swift Perks, petitioned the then Home Secretary, Viscount Melbourne for the sentence imposed on their son be remitted from transportation for life to transportation to 7 or even 14 years so that there would be a probability of him returning to take the trade of the petitioner, which he would at any time give up to him. The petition was refused.6
Occupation1837He was a Blacksmith in 1837 at Brial Street, Boorowa, NSW, AustraliaG.
ArticleMarch 1853Josiah George Swift Perks and Isabella Ann Perks bought a 10 acre block from James Grosvenor at Campbell Street, Boorowa, NSW, AustraliaG, in March 1853.7
Article1859George Perks was paid £7-10-0 on 7 December 1859 and £2-14-6 (cheque No. 18) on 24 April 1861 by James Gorham. These payments appear in the Cash Book maintained by James Gorham of Gunnary Creek.8
Article1885The 1885 Parliamentary Index of Landholders in NSW records that Josiah George Perks owned 470 acres of land near Young.

Family with

Isabella Ann Shelbourne b. 1805, d. 7 Dec 1870
Children
ChartsPedigree Chart for Robert Mote
Descendant Chart - Richard Millington Perks
Last Edited5 Dec 2009

Citations

  1. [S46] International Genealogical Index (IGI).
  2. [S693] Christopher Perks, "The Perks Family," e-mail to Robert Mote, October 2007.
  3. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Burrowa, Registration Year: 1871, Registration Number: 2941 - It is registered in the NSW BDM Index under George Perkinson but appears as George Perks in the Register.
  4. [S6] Marilyn Rowan, "Transcription of B, D or M," transcription to Robert Mote, Ref No: 1871/2941.
  5. [S219] Pauline E Sullivan, "Trial of George Swift Perks," e-mail to Robert Mote, March 2001.
  6. [S1036] Paul Andrews, "Family details," e-mail to Robert Mote, July 2016, Findmypast/TNA HO17/27/CR57.
  7. [S858] Charts, Lists Documents, Preston Family Tree.
  8. [S57] Desmond C Gorham, The Gorham Family on Gunnary Creek.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

William Wales

M, #682, b. 1800, d. 23 June 1884
FatherWilliam Wales
MotherMargaret Wales
Relationship3rd great-grandfather of Robert Mote

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1800William Wales was born in 1800 at Cockermouth, Cumberland, EnglandG.
He was the son of William Wales and Margaret Wales.
Marriage12 April 1827William Wales married Eliza Hynes, daughter of Unknown Hynes / Hyndes / Hayes and Ellen Unknown, on Thursday, 12 April 1827 at St Peter's Church of England, Richmond, NSW, AustraliaG, with the consent of Eliza's mother, Ellen. They were married by the Rev. John Cross (Assistant Chaplain in the Anglican Parish of Richmond) in the presence of John Brennan and Margaret Mills, both of Richmond.
Marriage3 June 1840William was married to Bridgette Nolan, daughter of John Nolan and Mary Glynn, on Wednesday, 3 June 1840 at Bowning, NSW, AustraliaG.
Death23 June 1884William Wales died on Monday, 23 June 1884 at Rye Park, NSW, AustraliaG.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Name VariationWilliam Wales was also known as William Wailes This spelling appears in his trial and prison records.

Criminal Record

DatePlaceDetails
1819William Wales [1800 to 23-6-1884, aged 84]

The year was 1819, end of the fifty eighth and beginning of the fifty ninth years of the reign of King George III of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and King of Hanover. About September of that year, a young man of nineteen named William Wailes stole twelve tame fowl, worth ten pence, from a Mr William Fenwick in the Parish of Gosforth, Northumberland, England; a crime for which he was destined to be transported to Port Jackson in New Holland (ie Sydney in New South Wales, Australia).

William's Sentencing
All of the records concerning William's case show the spelling of his surname as Wailes. This is also the case in the records in Australia that record his arrival. It is in later records in Australia that the spelling of Wales is first encountered and it is this spelling that the family uses to this day.

Indications are that William was a native of Cockermouth, Cumberland , England; being the son of a farming family, William and Margaret Wailes , and born about March in 1800.

William's Indictment reads as follows:

NORTHUMBERLAND - THE JURORS for our lord the King, upon their Oath, present that William Wales late of the Parish of Alnwich in the County of Northumberland, Labourer, on the twentieth day of October in the fifty ninth year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord George the Third, King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and so forth, with Force and Arms, at the Parish of Gosforth in the said county, Twelve Tame and Reclaimed Fowls, the Goods and Chattels of William Fenwick of the Value of Ten-pence, being then and there found did then and there feloniously steal, take and carry away, against the peace of our Sovereign Lord the King, His Crown and Dignity.

WITNESSES
Mary Fenwick
Elisabeth Armstrong
Thomas Auston
Thomas John Turnbull


The indictment was declared a 'true bill' by the jury which decided there was a case to be answered. William was sent to be tried by the Justices of the Peace at the Michaelmas Quarter Sessions in the Town of Newcastle Upon Tyne charged with larceny. William pleaded guilty to the charge, was found guilty and it was "ordered that he the said William Wailes be transported to such parts of His Majesty's Dominions beyond the seas as His Majesty in Council shall direct for the Term of seven years" .

Further entries mentioning William Wailes can be found in The Privy Council Register, The Criminal Register and the Transportation File but provide no additional information.

William was moved to the Convict Hulk Justitia, which was located on the Thames near Woolwich, and subsequently to the ship Neptune for his trip to Port Jackson on the other side of the world.
2 October 1826William Wales received his certificate of freedom on 2 October 1826.
William's name appeared in a Public Notice in the Australian , on 8 November 1826, announcing that William had received his Certificate of Freedom on Monday, 2 October 1826 together with Benjamin Lee, Roger Mucalear and Benjamin Wilson, all of whom had also arrived in Sydney aboard the Neptune in 1820. The certificate contains the following details:

     Name:          William Wales
     Vessel:          Neptune (3)
     Year arrived:     1820
     Where convicted:     Northumberland
     When convicted:     2 October, 1819
     Term:          7 Years
     Native Place:     Cockermouth
     Calling:          Husbandman
     Age:          26
     Height:          6' 0"
     Complexion:     Ruddy
     Hair:          Brown
     Eyes:          Hazel.

Voyages

DateDetails
23 March 1820William Wales was a convict aboard The Schooner Neptune (I) which left at The Downs, Kent, EnglandG, on Thursday, 23 March 1820. On January 29th 1820, King George III died at Windsor Palace and was succeeded by his son George IV. News of this event would first arrive in Sydney aboard the ship Neptune which transported William Wailes to Port Jackson. The surgeon on the Neptune during this trip was James Mitchell , who was appointed as Surgeon Superintendent to Male Convicts on 19th February 1820 and joined his ship the Neptune that afternoon. The Neptune was being fitted out at Deptford at the time, together with the Mangles which was also to carry convicts to Port Jackson. James Mitchell, the Surgeon, kept a Journal covering his period with the Neptune and records that "Lieutenant Rice of the 46th Regiment (which is at present in India) and a detachment of the 46th Regiment consisting of a Sergeant and 30 men with 7 wives and 3 children joined the Neptune as Guards of the convicts". Lieutenant Rice had formerly been with a Regiment of Troopers called the 7th and was with them at the battle of Waterloo. Upon their arrival in Sydney these men would become part of the 48th Regiment, then situated in New South Wales.

The Neptune ran into a number of difficulties while making her departure from England. On her way down the Thames from Deptford to Woolwich, the Pilot ran her aground on the Isle of Dogs. She was extracted from there unharmed but returned to Deptford. The following day she set off again to Blackwall and then to Woolwich where they took aboard 156 convicts, 20 of whom were boys who were kept in separate accommodations to the adult convicts on the Neptune. The convicts' ages ranged from 15 to 68. Captain McKissock (a native of Ayr in Scotland) joined his ship at this point and is described by the Surgeon as "a very fine looking man, very muscular and of an athletic appearance". The Neptune then sailed for Gravesend but the same "stupid Pilot" put them on a sand bank in the river. Although the sand was soft and the Neptune was soon off again unharmed, this must have been a frightening experience for the convicts locked below decks. As the wind was now against them, they hired a Steam Boat to tow them down to Gravesend. While at Gravesend a new Pilot was taken aboard as well as the stock for the trip.

Following reports of the high number of deaths and shocking conditions in some of the early convict ships, new rules had been introduced for the transport of convicts. Ship owners were now paid for the number of convicts that arrived in good health in Sydney rather than for the number taken aboard in England, and certain conditions applied concerning food and accommodation. For instance, provision had to be made for two gallons of Port Wine per convict for the trip (given twice a week after dinner) and lemonade daily (as protection against scurvy). In his journal the Surgeon shows his disapproval of such goods being lavished upon the convicts during the trip. He writes that they had "more provisions than they could possibly consume, they even gave their overplus of porridge and pea soup to the pigs! When sick they are allowed every luxury, such as Donkins Preserved meats at 2/6 per pound ........ they are better accommodated and better fed, and more kindly treated than our brave defenders by sea and land". During the trip, schools were held for both the men and the boys. Many learned to read and write and recite passages from the Bible during the trip. The Surgeon also provided the Sunday sermons aboard ship.

The Neptune next sailed for The Downs, in the Straits of Dover between Ramsgate and Deal, but again the Surgeon reports that "before we got to Margate our Pilot 'tho a very celebrated one, continued with great dexterity to put the Ship on a sandbank, but very providentially it did not blow for if it had we must have gone to pieces". One can only imagine how the convicts were feeling after yet another grounding. The Neptune survived her third grounding, anchored at Margate for the night, reached The Downs the next morning with a firm breeze, lay to - rather than anchor - while sending ashore their final despatches and then proceeded down the English Channel. The date was Thursday 23rd March 1820.

The Neptune's run of bad luck continued as she immediately ran into violent and contrary winds that soon had most of the convicts quite sea sick or perhaps sick with fear. While other ships apparently headed for harbour, the Neptune remained at sea in the Channel. They didn't manage to clear the Lizard Point, the most southerly point in England, until about 27th March and then, after crossing the Bay of Biscay, were past Cape Finisterre, a notorious promontory in North West Spain that juts out into the Atlantic Ocean and has claimed many a sailing ship heading south, and were finally into the open Atlantic with fine weather.

The Neptune passed to the Northward of the Desotas and Madeira Islands off the African coast and ran into two more violent storms; one on the 3rd May and a full hurricane on the 26th and 27th May. On the 13th May the Surgeon delivered a Private's wife of a baby girl. Nearing the Equator one Sunday, they met a ship returning to England and sent letters aboard to be carried home. A further storm with thunder and lightning and rolling seas hit them on the 13th June and on the 17th June the Surgeon delivered a second baby girl to another Private's wife. The Surgeon lamented in his journal that only one of the other women offered to assist at the birth of the two babies, even though they were in rough seas at the time. They passed the northern end of Tristan Da Cunah in the south Atlantic then steered a course along the 39th degree of latitude for St. Pauls Island in the Southern Ocean, which they located quite accurately, and straight on for Bass Strait. Ships took this course to take advantage of the "roaring forties" which gave a fast passage direct to Bass Strait. The Neptune, for instance, made an average 210 miles per day in the early days of July while running before a "fresh gale" and with following heavy seas. While such conditions provided a very fast passage, they were also very dangerous; requiring constant vigilance at the helm to avoid broaching side on to the waves and being swamped or being driven under by the following waves crashing down on the stern if sufficient speed was not maintained. You cannot afford to lose your sail to storm winds in such conditions. A number of ships suffered such a fate, and even today, yachts have been rolled and dismasted in such seas.

The Neptune sighted Cape Otway (in what is now southern Victoria) but then encountered strong head winds which prevented her from entering Bass Strait for five or six days. The Captain was ready to sail around Van Dieman's Land (now Tasmania), a trip of some ten days, when the winds finally changed and they were able to sail through the Strait. The Surgeon notes that in the Strait they passed between the Island of Rodents and Crocodile Rock (a rock almost submerged and therefore difficult to see) about dusk, a dangerous passage not often taken. While sailing up the east coast of New Holland (Australia) the Neptune yet again very nearly came to grief; this time on Cape Howe. It was night and the Second Mate was sailing close to the coast at a fast rate. The Captain, who was in bed, was suddenly "seized with some presentiment" and rushed on deck to find the sea breaking over a reef of rocks extending out from the Cape immediately ahead of the ship. They only just had time to put about and avoid the reef. The Surgeon notes that the Second Mate was both "very short sighted and extremely careless".

About 2 o'clock on Saturday 15th July 1820 the Neptune was off the entrance to Botany Bay. They continued up the coast until they sighted the Port Jackson Lighthouse where they fired a gun and hoisted a flag for a Pilot. The Pilot came out in a small boat and they sailed in between the heads but were becalmed out of sight of their destination, Sydney Town. They anchored for the night near a couple of South Sea Whalers and the Surgeon notes that "in the evening the Naval Officer Captain Piper came on board, he appears a very Gentlemanly man, and is considered the most liberal, and most polite man in all the Territory, and he is most undoubtedly the most universally beloved of any man in New South Wales".

The next morning, a Sunday, the Neptune finally anchored off Sydney Town but it was to be a further fortnight before the convicts were landed and handed over to Governor Macquarie. This was partly due to the fact that the Neptune carried the first news of King George the Third's death which then required various ceremonies to be conducted, and partly because the arrival of the convicts had to be published in the Gazette and sufficient time allowed for the news to be passed to the more distant parts of the colony so that the Settlers had time to come into Sydney to collect those convicts that they might wish to have as labourers.


The Surgeon, James Mitchell, moved ashore and took lodgings with a Mr Johns, one of the first convicts to arrive in New South Wales, at an exorbitant rate of 30/- ($3) per week. During his seven week stay in the colony, James Mitchell stayed or dined with many of the colony's elite. These included:

·     The Naval Officer, Captain Piper
·     Commandant of the Garrison, Major Druitt
·     Governor Macquarie
·     Commissioner Bigge (investigating the Rum Hospital among other things)
·     The Surveyor General, Lieutenant Oxley
·     Mr Hamilton Hume
·     Mr McArthur Senior

On the Sunday following the Neptune's arrival, Governor Macquarie proclaimed a meeting of all the Military, Naval and Civil Officers, together with the respectable part of the Colony, to attend a funeral sermon on the death of the Late King George III. On the Monday the same people gathered to proclaim the new King, George IV, and drink his health. The Military fired a Feu de Joie before the Government House.

The convicts were landed one morning about 6 o'clock, having first been outfitted in new clothing which consisted of spare military uniforms and forage caps. When lined up in the gaol for inspection by the Governor they looked more like a part of the Guard Regiment than prisoners. Governor Macquarie ordered that their red coats be taken back and dyed yellow. The Surgeon notes that no floggings had been necessary during the trip as minor punishments had sufficed. No convicts had any complaints when asked by the Governor if they had been treated correctly during the passage from England.

James Mitchell returned to England with the Neptune via Java. During the period 1820 - 1824 he made a total of three voyages to New South Wales on the Convict Ships Neptune and Guildford. On the second voyage of the Guildford in 1823 - 1824 he suffered a mental and physical collapse that resulted in his admission to the Lunatic Asylum at Haslar upon his return to England.

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
Family-HistoryYou can read more about the Wales Family History by clicking here.
Association1800The Wales Families existed in 1800; My Family Tree Branch.

Family with 1

Eliza Hynes b. 1811, d. c 1840
Children

Family with 2

Bridgette Nolan b. 1819, d. 8 May 1901
Children
ChartsPedigree Chart for Robert Mote
Descendant Chart - William Wales
Last Edited24 Jan 2012

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Elizabeth Pitt

F, #684, b. 24 December 1716, d. circa 31 August 1761
FatherThomas Pitt
MotherFrances Medstone
Relationships5th great-grandmother of Robert Mote
Mother of James Thomas John Bean

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Baptism24 December 1716Elizabeth Pitt was baptized on Thursday, 24 December 1716 at Portsea, Hampshire, EnglandG.1
She was the daughter of Thomas Pitt and Frances Medstone.
Marriage12 May 1734Elizabeth was married to Thomas Bean, son of Thomas Beane and Unknown Beane Thomas' Wife, on Wednesday, 12 May 1734 at St Mary's Church, South Hayling, Hampshire, EnglandG.
Deathcirca 31 August 1761Elizabeth Pitt died circa 31 August 1761 at Hayling, Hampshire, EnglandG.
Burial31 August 1761She was buried on 31 August 1761 at South Hayling, Hampshire, EnglandG.2

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1734As of 12 May 1734, her married name was Bean.

Family with

Thomas Bean b. 18 Aug 1711, d. bt 8 Oct 1761 - 11 Oct 1761
Children
ChartsPedigree Chart for Robert Mote
Indented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Last Edited9 Oct 2011

Citations

  1. [S599] Roger Blatchford Larose, "Pitt Family," e-mail to Robert Mote, April 2003.
  2. [S515] Ian Collett, "Ancestors of Philip Collett," e-mail to Robert Mote, July 2004, e-mail report from Mrs Karen Bali, People Search Tracing Services.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Eliza Hynes

F, #685, b. 1811, d. circa 1840
FatherUnknown Hynes / Hyndes / Hayes d. b 1824
MotherEllen Unknown b. 1785
Relationship3rd great-grandmother of Robert Mote

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1811Eliza Hynes was born in 1811 at IrelandG.
She was the daughter of Unknown Hynes / Hyndes / Hayes and Ellen Unknown.
Marriage12 April 1827Eliza Hynes married William Wales, son of William Wales and Margaret Wales, on Thursday, 12 April 1827 at St Peter's Church of England, Richmond, NSW, AustraliaG, with the consent of Eliza's mother, Ellen. They were married by the Rev. John Cross (Assistant Chaplain in the Anglican Parish of Richmond) in the presence of John Brennan and Margaret Mills, both of Richmond.
Deathcirca 1840Eliza Hynes died circa 1840 at AustraliaG.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Name VariationEliza Hynes was sometimes recorded under the name Hyndes.
Married Name1827As of 12 April 1827, her married name was Wales.

Voyages

DateDetails
12 March 1825Eliza Hynes was a passenger aboard The Ship Mariner which sailed from Cork, IrelandG, on Saturday, 12 March 1825 on its second voyage to Sydney and arrived there on Sunday, 10 July 1825 after a trip of 120 days. The Master for this voyage was William Fotherly and the Surgeon was Harman Cochrane.

Family with

William Wales b. 1800, d. 23 Jun 1884
Children
ChartsPedigree Chart for Robert Mote
Descendant Chart - William Wales
Last Edited8 Nov 2000

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Margaret Ann Percival

F, #686, b. 15 February 1842, d. 6 February 1930
Margaret Ann Wales, née Percival.
Photograph provided by Kathy Harris.
FatherWilliam Ambrose Percival b. 1811, d. 20 Nov 1886
MotherMargaret Ann Semple b. 15 Apr 1822, d. 22 Aug 1862
Relationship2nd great-grandmother of Robert Mote

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth15 February 1842Margaret Ann Percival was born on Tuesday, 15 February 1842 at Argyle Street, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaG.1
She was the daughter of William Ambrose Percival and Margaret Ann Semple.
Marriage1 January 1859Margaret Ann was married to Edward Wales, son of William Wales and Eliza Hynes, on Saturday, 1 January 1859 at Burrowa, NSW, AustraliaG.
Death6 February 1930Margaret Ann Percival died on Thursday, 6 February 1930 at 28 Villiers Street, Rockdale, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 87.2
Burial7 February 1930She was buried on 7 February 1930 at Methodist Cemetery, Young, NSW, AustraliaG. The officiating Methodist Minister was P H Curtis and the Undertakers were Motor Funerals Ltd, in conjunction with H R Blackett and Son, Young. The witnesses were A E Collins and W Venables.2

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1859As of 1 January 1859, her married name was Wales.

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
The Grenfell Record, Grenfell, NSW, AustraliaG22 April 1929Margaret Ann Percival was mentioned in an article in The Grenfell Record, Grenfell, NSW, AustraliaG, on Monday, 22 April 1929 as follows:
ONE OF THE MOTHERS OF THE AUSTRALIAN RACE

PIONEER CELEBRATES 90th BIRTHDAY

Her home was on the bushrangers visiting list. Mrs. Margaret Wales who lived at Young for 30 years and was one of the south western pioneers celebrated her ninetieth birthday during the week, says young witness.

The mother of thirteen children she is still hale and hearty. A typical example of the hardy race which blazed the trail in the virgin bush and laid the foundations of the great south-west. Today she surveys with pride descendants whose number total 114. A record which anyone could be justifiably proud. Unlike most of the pioneers who have reached her age Mrs. Wales is an Australian. She was born in Sydney in 1839 a daughter of the late Mr. William Percival who brought his wife and young family in a bullock dray to the heart of the bush among the densely timbered hills of Rye Park. With axe and saw and rude and primitive implements this lion hearted man carved a home for himself and family. He came from hardy stock as did his wife, experienced all the discomforts of living cut off from the warmth almost from civilization and handed down a tradition of industry and good Christian living as well as the gifts of physical strength and longevity.
Mrs. Wales is 90 and her brother Thomas Percival of Boorowa is 87 and her sister, Mrs. Nealon of Grenfell who died on Tuesday was well into her eighties. Such is the reward Mother Nature gives those who work hard in her service. Mrs. Wales had never been under a doctor’s care until she was in her seventies and the family had grown up.
Other members of the family are Oliver, Albert, Fred (Young), Charles, Alfred, Hubert in Sydney, Mrs. Pearsall in Young, Mrs. W. Herrett, Mrs. W. Hourn, Mrs. M. Gannon, Mrs. T. McBeth, Mrs. W. Gabo in Sydney.
There are 50 grandchildren, 43 great grandchildren making a total of 114 descendants.
At 90 Mrs. Wales is enjoying the best of health. She takes a great interest in all current affairs and can discuss them with intelligence and clarity. Always a splendid needlewoman her eyesight today is into fashioning beautiful examples of fancywork is as strong as ever and she travels from one member of the family to another without if assistance.
This old lady now is the sear and yellow leaf. One of the real mothers of a new and virile Australia which has proved itself in every sphere of endeavour. From such pioneers was inherited the sterling qualities of courage, resource, determination and a noble spirit of self sacrifice that overcame all difficulties.3

Family with

Edward Wales b. 19 Jul 1837, d. 3 Feb 1915
Children
ChartsPedigree Chart for Robert Mote
Descendant Chart - William Ambrose Percival
Descendant Chart - William Wales
Last Edited8 Jul 2013

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Denomination: Church of England
    Parish: Sydney, St James'
    Volume Reference: V1842345 26A
    Registration Year: 1842.
  2. [S6] Marilyn Rowan, "Transcription of B, D or M," transcription to Robert Mote, Death of Margaret Ann Wales.
  3. [S912] Dave McKeough, "Extracts from the Grenfell Record," e-mail to Robert Mote, May 2011.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Isabella Ann Shelbourne

F, #687, b. 1805, d. 7 December 1870
FatherJohn Shelburne
MotherAnn Killroy
Relationship3rd great-grandmother of Robert Mote

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1805Isabella Ann Shelbourne was born in 1805 at Dublin, IrelandG.
She was the daughter of John Shelburne and Ann Killroy.
Marriage12 March 1832Isabella Ann Shelbourne married Josiah George Swift Perks, son of Richard Millington Perks and Ann Snape, on Monday, 12 March 1832 at Place of Worship, Bathurst, NSW, AustraliaG, by John Espy Kearne, Chaplain, Church of England. They had to make a formal application to the Government for permission to marry by banns. The ceremony was conducted by John Espey Keane, Chaplain of the Church of England, Bathurst. At the time of their marriage George had been in the colony for five years and was 24 years of age. Isabella had been in the colony for two years and was 28 years old.
Death7 December 1870Isabella Ann Perks died on Wednesday, 7 December 1870 at Burrowa, NSW, AustraliaG.1
Burialcirca 8 December 1870She was buried circa 8 December 1870 at Lang's Creek Anglican cemetery, Boorowa, NSW, AustraliaG.2

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Name VariationIsabella Ann Shelbourne was also known as Shelburne.2
Name VariationIsabella Ann Shelbourne was also known as Isabella Maria Shelbourne.
Name VariationIsabella Ann Shelbourne was also known as Mary Brett.
Name VariationIsabella Ann Shelbourne was also known as Mary Britt.
Married Name1832As of 12 March 1832, her married name was Perks.

Description

DateDescription
Isabella Ann Shelbourne was described as five feet tall, had fair hair, a ruddy, freckled complexion, brown/hazel eyes and dark brown hair. She had a diagonal scar on her right side upper lip.

Criminal Record

DatePlaceDetails
Isabella Ann Shelbourne was sentenced to seven years imprisonment for stealing Golden Seals. She was 25 years old at the time.
20 August 1833She received her certificate of freedom on 20 August 1833 after serving four of her seven years sentence. She was required to remain in the District of Bathurst.

Voyages

DateDetails
3 June 1830Isabella Ann Shelbourne was a convict aboard The Ship Forth II which sailed from Cork, IrelandG, on Thursday, 3 June 1830 and arrived in Sydney, NSW on 12 October 1830. The Master was James Robertson and the Surgeon was Joseph Cook.

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
OccupationIsabella Ann Shelbourne was a Mantua Maker.
ArticleMarch 1853Josiah George Swift Perks and Isabella Ann Perks bought a 10 acre block from James Grosvenor at Campbell Street, Boorowa, NSW, AustraliaG, in March 1853.3

Family with

Josiah George Swift Perks b. 22 Jan 1808, d. 1 May 1871
Children
ChartsPedigree Chart for Robert Mote
Descendant Chart - Richard Millington Perks
Last Edited5 Dec 2009

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Death Registration: Burrowa, Registration Year: 1870, Registration Number: 2866.
  2. [S120] St John's Church, Boorowa, NSW The Parish Council, Lang's Creek Cemetery, Record # 111.
  3. [S858] Charts, Lists Documents, Preston Family Tree.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Frances Wainwright

F, #688
Relationship4th great-grandmother of Robert Mote

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
MarriageFrances was married to John Armstrong.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married NameHer married name was Armstrong.

Family with

John Armstrong
Child
ChartsPedigree Chart for Robert Mote
Descendant Chart - John Armstrong
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Mary Ann Wallace

F, #689, b. 1773
FatherJames Wallace
MotherNancy Unknown
Relationship4th great-grandmother of Robert Mote

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1773Mary Ann Wallace was born in 1773.
She was the daughter of James Wallace and Nancy Unknown.
Marriagecirca 1803Mary Ann was married to Thomas Edgerton circa 1803 at Clones, County Monaghan, IrelandG.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1803As of circa 1803, her married name was Edgerton.

Family with

Thomas Edgerton b. 1766, d. 1832
Children
ChartsPedigree Chart for Robert Mote
Descendant Chart - Thomas Edgerton
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

William Mathieson

M, #690, b. 7 January 1816, d. 4 December 1880
FatherJames Matheson
MotherMary Boyd

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth7 January 1816William Mathieson was born on Sunday, 7 January 1816 at New Monkland, Lanarkshire, ScotlandG.1
He was the son of James Matheson and Mary Boyd.
Christening14 January 1816William Mathieson was christened on 14 January 1816.
Marriage5 April 1840William was married to Agnes Brown, daughter of Alexander Brown and Mary Hart, on Sunday, 5 April 1840 at Greenside Lane, Lanark, Lanarkshire, ScotlandG; IGI - M116489.
Death13 February 1880William Mathieson died on Friday, 13 February 1880 at age 64; as supplied by Mr William Francis Macrea.
Death4 December 1880He died on Saturday, 4 December 1880 at Newcastle, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 64.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Name Variation1840As of 1840, William Mathieson was also known as Matheson as shown in IGI - M116489.

Voyages

DateDetails
30 April 1854William Mathieson was a passenger aboard The Ship Albatross which sailed from Liverpool, Lancashire, EnglandG, on Sunday, 30 April 1854 and arrived 27 July 1854 in Melbourne, VIC. The Master was William Geves and the ship carried 350 passengers.

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
Occupationbefore 1854William Mathieson was a cotton hand loom weaver before 1854.

Family with

Agnes Brown b. 7 Jun 1814, d. 18 Jun 1895
Children
Last Edited17 Nov 2008

Citations

  1. [S450] Jan McInnes, "Jonas Jackson," e-mail to Robert Mote, various.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Agnes Brown

F, #691, b. 7 June 1814, d. 18 June 1895
FatherAlexander Brown b. 1781, d. 17 Dec 1851
MotherMary Hart b. 1781, d. 26 Apr 1853

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth7 June 1814Agnes Brown was born on Tuesday, 7 June 1814 at Douglas, ScotlandG.
She was the daughter of Alexander Brown and Mary Hart.
Christening12 June 1814Agnes Brown was christened on 12 June 1814 at Douglas, Lanarkshire, ScotlandG.
Marriage5 April 1840Agnes was married to William Mathieson, son of James Matheson and Mary Boyd, on Sunday, 5 April 1840 at Greenside Lane, Lanark, Lanarkshire, ScotlandG; IGI - M116489.
Death18 June 1895Agnes Brown died on Tuesday, 18 June 1895 at Newcastle, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 81.
Burial19 June 1895She was buried on 19 June 1895 at Sandgate cemetery, Newcastle, NSW, AustraliaG.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1840As of 5 April 1840, her married name was Mathieson.

Voyages

DateDetails
30 April 1854Agnes Brown was a passenger aboard The Ship Albatross which sailed from Liverpool, Lancashire, EnglandG, on Sunday, 30 April 1854 and arrived 27 July 1854 in Melbourne, VIC. The Master was William Geves and the ship carried 350 passengers.

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
The Newcastle Morning Herald, Australia19 June 1895Agnes Brown had an obituary appear in The Newcastle Morning Herald, Australia, on Wednesday, 19 June 1895 as follows: The remains of Mrs William Mathieson sen. will be removed from her late residence, No. 5 off Melville Street, Cook's Hill this day (Thursday) afternoon at half past two o'clock for Sandgate cemetery. Archibald Hay Undertaker.

Family with

William Mathieson b. 7 Jan 1816, d. 4 Dec 1880
Children
Last Edited14 Nov 2006

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

John Miller

M, #692, b. 24 August 1812, d. 6 July 1882
FatherJohn Millar b. c 1788
MotherJanet Stirrat

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth24 August 1812John Miller was born on Monday, 24 August 1812 at Airdrie, Lanarkshire, ScotlandG.
He was the son of John Millar and Janet Stirrat.
Marriage23 November 1833John was married to Mary Wilson, daughter of William Wilson and Janet Wotherspoon, on Saturday, 23 November 1833 at New Monkland, ScotlandG.
Death3 July 1882John Miller died on Monday, 3 July 1882 at in the harbour at, Newcastle, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 69; this alternate date was advised by Peter Macrea.
Death6 July 1882He died on Thursday, 6 July 1882 at Newcastle, NSWG, at age 69.

Voyages

DateDetails
1849John Miller paid for their own passage to Sydney.
7 February 1849He was a passenger aboard The Barque Agenoria which sailed from Plymouth, Devon, EnglandG, on Wednesday, 7 February 1849 and arrived in Sydney on 25 May 1849 under Captain R Newby.

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
the local paper, Newcastle, NSW, AustraliaGafter 7 July 1882John Miller had a report on an inquest into his death appear in the local paper, Newcastle, NSW, AustraliaG, after 7 July 1882 as follows: THE LATE CASE OF DROWNING
Coroner's Inquest
     Mr Ranclaud, District Coroner, held an inquest yesterday afternoon at Scott's Albion Hotel, Watt Street, Newcastle, on the body of an elderly man named John Miller, a blacksmith, who had been found drowned in the harbour on the previous evening.
     Henry Secker, second steward of the S.S. Koonawarra, lying at the A.A. Company's wharf, deposed that about 8 p.m. he had just left the vessel, and was passing through a wicket gate in a wall dividing the A.A. Co's property from the government staiths; saw an object, which he believed to be a man or a woman, move and run towards the water, in the dark, called out, "what are you doing there?"
then sang out to the schooner " Alert", laying near at hand that there was a man in the water, but got no reply; ran down to another vessel and shouted an alarm, but the men on the deckhouse shut the door; met the second officer of the Koonawarra and accompanied by him searched the place, but saw nothing in the water, and reported the matter to the police; heard a splash when the man ran towards the water, but seeing his body disappear, did not think it necessary to venture in as the night was extremely dark.
     W. P. Constable Robert Barr deposed to having accompanied W.P. Constable Harrison to the spot, and to having discovered the body between the ketch Maggie and the wharf, on the other side of the gate from the place pointed out by previous witness; hailed the ketch; got a light and found the body in a stooping position face down, with the feet dragging on the botton as they dragged, when he pulled the corpse ashore; tried all means of resusitation before Dr. R. Harris arrived; searched the body at the dead-house and found two half-soverigns,1s 6d in silver, two coppers a pair of spectacles, and some papers by which deceased was subsequently recognised; it was low water at the time,and deceased had gone into the harbour about one or two paces.
     John Peterson, landlord of the Market Wharf Hotel, identified the body as that of John Miller, whom he had known for many years; on the day of his death about noon he visited his hotel in great pain, and was shewn into a room to fix a truss which he wore, being perfectly sober at the time; conversed with him for a considerable time, and the pain returning again, shewed him into a room, where he remained a considerable time; deceased returned to the bar and had some schnappe, and about 4 p.m. seemed in much greater pain, and again went into the room, where witness attended him, and let him lay down until 7 p.m; then called to know how long he was going to remain, as the room was engaged, and deceased rose, saying he would go home; witness having to attend a lodge meeting, told his groom to look after him; while in conversation deceased said he wanted a case of gin, paid for one; in his agony said he wished God Almighty would relieve him, but never alluded to anything about self destruction.
     Dr. Richard Harris, Government medical officer, deposed to death having occurred from drowning; recognised the body as that of John Miller, of Darby Street, whom he was intimate with for many
years; did not think it possible he would have committed suicide; he had been suffering from a painful disease for many years.
     The jury returned a verdict of accidental drowning.

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
Note1851John Miller John Miller and his son went to the goldfields in 1851 in 1851.

Family with

Mary Wilson b. 20 Dec 1813, d. 8 Sep 1881
Children
Last Edited21 May 2007

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Mary Wilson

F, #693, b. 20 December 1813, d. 8 September 1881
FatherWilliam Wilson b. 21 Sep 1783
MotherJanet Wotherspoon b. 5 Nov 1782

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth20 December 1813Mary Wilson was born on Monday, 20 December 1813 at Holytown, ScotlandG.
She was the daughter of William Wilson and Janet Wotherspoon.
Marriage23 November 1833Mary was married to John Miller, son of John Millar and Janet Stirrat, on Saturday, 23 November 1833 at New Monkland, ScotlandG.
Death8 September 1881Mary Wilson died on Thursday, 8 September 1881 at 278 Darby Street, Newcastle, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 67.
Burialcirca 9 September 1881She was buried circa 9 September 1881 at Sandgate Cemetery, Newcastle, NSW, AustraliaG, where she was the first interment.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1833As of 23 November 1833, her married name was Miller.

Voyages

DateDetails
7 February 1849Mary Wilson was a passenger aboard The Barque Agenoria which sailed from Plymouth, Devon, EnglandG, on Wednesday, 7 February 1849 and arrived in Sydney on 25 May 1849 under Captain R Newby.

Family with

John Miller b. 24 Aug 1812, d. 6 Jul 1882
Children
Last Edited14 Nov 2006

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Mary W Mathieson

F, #694, b. 27 February 1869
FatherAlexander Mathieson b. 22 Sep 1844, d. 29 Jul 1932
MotherChristina Allen Miller b. 8 Jul 1847, d. 18 Oct 1930

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
DeathMary W Mathieson died at AustraliaG.
Birth27 February 1869She was born on Saturday, 27 February 1869 at Newcastle, NSW, AustraliaG.1
She was the daughter of Alexander Mathieson and Christina Allen Miller.
Last Edited14 Nov 2006

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Birth Registration: Newcastle, Registration Year: 1869, Registration Number: 14922.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Agnes Brown Mathieson

F, #695, b. 6 February 1874, d. 27 May 1952
FatherAlexander Mathieson b. 22 Sep 1844, d. 29 Jul 1932
MotherChristina Allen Miller b. 8 Jul 1847, d. 18 Oct 1930

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth6 February 1874Agnes Brown Mathieson was born on Friday, 6 February 1874 at Newcastle, NSW, AustraliaG.1
She was the daughter of Alexander Mathieson and Christina Allen Miller.
Death27 May 1952Agnes Brown Mathieson died on Tuesday, 27 May 1952 at AustraliaG at age 78.
Last Edited19 Feb 2009

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Birth Registration: Newcastle, Registration Year: 1874, Registration Number: 15547.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

James Mathieson

M, #696, b. 16 July 1876, d. 22 July 1941
FatherAlexander Mathieson b. 22 Sep 1844, d. 29 Jul 1932
MotherChristina Allen Miller b. 8 Jul 1847, d. 18 Oct 1930

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth16 July 1876James Mathieson was born on Sunday, 16 July 1876 at Newcastle, NSW, AustraliaG.1
He was the son of Alexander Mathieson and Christina Allen Miller.
Death22 July 1941James Mathieson died on Tuesday, 22 July 1941 at Cessnock, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 65.2
Last Edited14 Nov 2006

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Birth Registration: Newcastle, Registration Year: 1876, Registration Number: 16633.
  2. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Death Registration: Cessnock, Registration Year: 1941, Registration Number: 20949.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Margaret Mathieson

F, #697, b. 3 August 1882, d. 4 October 1956
FatherAlexander Mathieson b. 22 Sep 1844, d. 29 Jul 1932
MotherChristina Allen Miller b. 8 Jul 1847, d. 18 Oct 1930

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth3 August 1882Margaret Mathieson was born on Thursday, 3 August 1882 at Newcastle, NSW, AustraliaG.
She was the daughter of Alexander Mathieson and Christina Allen Miller.
Death4 October 1956Margaret Mathieson died on Thursday, 4 October 1956 at AustraliaG at age 74.
Last Edited14 Nov 2006

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

John A B Mathieson

M, #698, b. 19 November 1880
FatherAlexander Mathieson b. 22 Sep 1844, d. 29 Jul 1932
MotherChristina Allen Miller b. 8 Jul 1847, d. 18 Oct 1930

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth19 November 1880John A B Mathieson was born on Friday, 19 November 1880 at Newcastle, NSW, AustraliaG.1
He was the son of Alexander Mathieson and Christina Allen Miller.
DeathJohn A B Mathieson died at AustraliaG.
Last Edited19 Feb 2009

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Birth Registration: Newcastle, Registration Year: 1881, Registration Number: 23105.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Beatrice A Mathieson

F, #699, b. 10 October 1885, d. 13 September 1953
FatherAlexander Mathieson b. 22 Sep 1844, d. 29 Jul 1932
MotherChristina Allen Miller b. 8 Jul 1847, d. 18 Oct 1930

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth10 October 1885Beatrice A Mathieson was born on Saturday, 10 October 1885 at Newcastle, NSW, AustraliaG.1
She was the daughter of Alexander Mathieson and Christina Allen Miller.
Death13 September 1953Beatrice A Mathieson died on Sunday, 13 September 1953 at AustraliaG at age 67.
Last Edited14 Nov 2006

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Birth Registration: Newcastle, Registration Year: 1885, Registration Number: 29199.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Ruby C A Mathieson

F, #700, b. 16 December 1887
FatherAlexander Mathieson b. 22 Sep 1844, d. 29 Jul 1932
MotherChristina Allen Miller b. 8 Jul 1847, d. 18 Oct 1930

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
DeathRuby C A Mathieson died at AustraliaG.
Birth16 December 1887She was born on Friday, 16 December 1887 at Newcastle, NSW, AustraliaG.1
She was the daughter of Alexander Mathieson and Christina Allen Miller.
Last Edited14 Nov 2006

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Birth Registration: Newcastle, Registration Year: 1888, Registration Number: 30865.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.