William Alt

M, #41, b. 10 November 1870, d. 5 March 1872
FatherChristopher Alt b. 20 May 1828, d. 15 Jul 1873
MotherMartha Crossley b. 15 Oct 1842, d. 14 Aug 1937
RelationshipsGranduncle of Robert Mote
2nd great-grandson of James Thomas John Bean
Great-grandson of James Crossley

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth10 November 1870William Alt was born on Thursday, 10 November 1870 at Yass, NSW, AustraliaG.
He was the son of Christopher Alt and Martha Crossley.
Death5 March 1872William Alt died on Tuesday, 5 March 1872 at Yass, NSWG, at age 1.
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - James Crossley
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Last Edited12 Sep 1999

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Sidonia Alt

F, #42, b. 17 December 1868, d. 15 July 1953
Hilda, Hubert, Sidonia, Olive, Norman and Dorothy Mellersh
FatherChristopher Alt b. 20 May 1828, d. 15 Jul 1873
MotherMartha Crossley b. 15 Oct 1842, d. 14 Aug 1937
RelationshipsGrandaunt of Robert Mote
2nd great-granddaughter of James Thomas John Bean
Great-granddaughter of James Crossley

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth17 December 1868Sidonia Alt was born on Thursday, 17 December 1868 at Fairy Hole Inn, Yass, NSW, AustraliaG.1
She was the daughter of Christopher Alt and Martha Crossley.
Marriage1889Sidonia was married to Hubert Leaf Mellersh, son of Frederick Mellersh and (Mary) Fanny Little, in 1889 at Yass, NSW, AustraliaG.2
Death15 July 1953Sidonia Alt died on Wednesday, 15 July 1953 at Neutral Bay, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 84.1

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1889As of 1889, her married name was Mellersh.

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
AnecdoteSidonia Alt, daughter of Christoph Alt and Martha Crossley, was born at Yass on 17 December 1868. She was reared in Yass and grew into a self-reliant, well-developed woman with dark hair, olive skin and brown eyes. In 1889, at the age of 20, she married Hubert Leaf Mellersh and bore him five children; Hilda, Hubert, Olive, Dorothy and Norman.
Mellersh was an Englishman, the son of one of two brothers, who owned a private bank, known as Mellersh Brothers Bank, at Guildford, near London. It later was taken over by a National Bank. He attended a Grammar School and his parents planned a life for him as a doctor. He got as far as studying chemistry at university before changing course and migrating, first to Fiji and then to Australia. In 1886, he entered into a partnership with Frederick George Moule to conduct a business as Auctioneers and Commission Agents at Yass. They became brothers?in?law on 1 January 1890, when Moule married Sidonia's youngest sister, Elizabeth. However, several months prior to the wedding, Mellersh disposed of his share of the business, possibly to concentrate on another business he owned at Yass, distilling and marketing eucalyptus oil. The oil was derived from the foliage of eucalypt trees, which were prolific in the area. The three elder children were born in Yass. The family subsequently moved to Young for a short time and Dorothy was born there. They then transferred to Randwick, Sydney, where Norman was born. The following entry appears in the annual Sands Directory for 1897 and 1898:
'H.L. MELLERSH, Mining Agent, 93 Pitt Street, Sydney. Private Residence "Glenburn", Fern Street, Randwick.' 93 Pitt Street was in the heart of the financial centre of Sydney. Hubert Mellersh was a likeable, charming man, adored by his sisters, played golf and was very fond of horses. The home at Randwick had stables at the rear, in which he housed his horse and phaeton. Reared in a wealthy home, he acquired, fairly early in life, a liking for alcoholic beverages. Although he was an enterprising man, his judgment in financial matters is open to some doubt, because of his investment in several unsuccessful companies, whose shares later proved to be worthless. He died of a stroke in 1898 and is buried in Waverley Cemetery.
Olive recalls her father's love of horses and remembers the family going into mourning after his death. She has vivid recollections of being delighted with her dainty black and white check frock (standard dress for young girls in mourning) and of her brothers wearing black Eton jackets with black ties. She also recalls everyone wearing black arm bands as a token of mourning following Queen Victoria's death in 1901.
Sidonia was a friendly, vital, energetic person, who kept herself constantly occupied. A good organizer, with sound financial sense, she was an active member of her Church and took a leading role in fund raising activities. In addition to liking and being very interested in young people, she was a good golfer and above average bridge player. After her husband's death, besides having the home in Randwick, she became the recipient from her Father-in-Law's Estate, of an income of £300 ($600) per annum. £300 doesn't sound much in 1987, but at that time, when an unskilled man earned only £100 a year, it was sufficient to enable her and the children, with care, to live comfortably. Food was cheap. Lamb chops cost 2½d. a pound (11¢ a kilo). Everyone grew vegetables in their backyards and a local Chinese market gardener called regularly selling vegetables very cheaply. The children were given 1½d. (3¢) a week, usually spent on home?made sweets at a little corner shop nearby. Cotton material was 2?1/2d. to 5d. a yard (5¢ to 10¢ for 914 mm.) and the girls learned to make their own clothes when they were teenagers. The girls were educated at Claremont Church of England College at Randwick and the boys at Scots College, Bellevue Hill. Norman subsequently attended Grammar and Shore, two other G.P.S. schools.
The family continued to live in the home at Randwick until 1908, when Sidonia's mother-in-law passed away, leaving her the recipient of a vastly increased income of some £1,500 per annum. It was necessary for Sidonia to go to England in connection with her inheritance and she decided to take Hilda (17) and Norman (12) with her. They had a wonderful trip lasting six or seven months, travelling both ways on the P. & O. Steamship 'India'. In England they stayed with Sidonia's sister-in-law, Fanny, in Holloway Hill House at Godalming about eight kilometres south of Guildford in Surrey. It was the home of the Mellersh family in England and was a big stone house set in some five acres of land. The house and the life style of those who lived in it were typical of a wealthy English family of that period. Norman recalls that it was a very formal home with a large staff of servants. He remembers joining girl cousins in an after school drive around the area in a dog cart driven by a coachman. Fanny died in 1971 at the age of 103. Holloway Hill House was taken over by the Armed Services in World War 2 and subsequently was purchased by the local council and demolished, the land being used for a housing estate.
While overseas, Sidonia and Hilda spent a fortnight visiting Ireland.
After returning from England, they lived at "Silverleigh", 66 Henrietta Street, Waverley. A large home, designed for entertaining, it was ideal for rearing a teenage family. Sidonia had an enlightened approach to bringing up a family and encouraged them to bring their friends home. On Sunday evenings they had a Gypsy Tea (an informal evening meal) and afterwards everyone participated in the washing up. One 'rule' was that anyone who left sugar in the bottom of the teacup had to go without sugar on the following Sunday. Olive and Dot gave up taking sugar at this time. Hilda met her future husband here, when he was brought to a tennis party. She was 23 when she married him, Henry Etherston Braylesford Loxton, a surveyor from Grafton, N.S.W., at St. Stephen's Church, Sydney, on 4 January 1913.
Prior to Hilda's marriage, Hubert had left home to go on the land and the house at Waverley was sold. The family then bought another at Mosman on the other side of the harbour. Life seemed dull after all the excitement of Hilda's marriage and Dot and Olive were very keen to go to England. They pestered their mother and eventually Sidonia told the girls that, if they could sell the house, they would all go. The girls got to work and the house and furniture were soon sold and off they went by ship for a six months trip. Norman had already joined Hubert on his property near Dalby in Queensland.
Whilst in England, Olive turned 21 on 5 June 1913 and this is how she described the celebration of her coming of age - 'June the 5th was Derby Day and the woman suffragette had thrown herself under the horse and all that sort of thing. I didn't go to the Derby, but two friends we had met on the ship coming home (to England) were in London. They had made a fuss of us on the boat and these days they would be described as our boyfriends. In those days, they were called "friends of the family", because mother was always with us and chaperoned us no doubt. She took us to dinner with the two friends at the Savoy Hotel. Derby night was a wonderful night. Everyone dressed in evening dress and top hats and opera cloaks and everything. Then we went to see a show called "The Girl in the Taxi", the musical show of the year. After the theatre, in those days, you went to supper as well. We went to the Trocadero, which was in the heart of Piccadilly at that time. We had the usual supper, very good, and then we danced until about one o'clock, after which we went home. I had the most wonderful 21st birthday. Of course, I had a beautiful new frock and new slippers and everything."
When Mellersh's mother died, she bequeathed £1,000 stg. to each grandchild, payable to each on attaining the age of 21. Olive received hers while they were in England, so the girls decided to tour the Continent while they had the opportunity. They had a wonderful time visiting places as far apart as Norway and Paris. The trip cost £300 each and as Dot, being only 19, had not yet received her £1,000 from the Estate, Olive loaned her the £300 to be repaid when she received her inheritance. In due course the money was repaid, enabling Olive to invest the remaining £700 of her legacy. This earned her £50 a year in interest, which, over the years, proved to be a very useful supplementary income.
They returned to Australia in November, 1913 and on the trip home received news of the birth of Hilda's first baby, Jack. They sat at the Purser's table and he produced champagne to celebrate, declaring that Sidonia was the youngest grandmother he had met for a long time. She was then nearly 45, full of energy, attractive and good company.
Hostilities in World War 1 commenced in August the following year. After the landing of Australian troops at Gallipoli on 25 April 1915, what was happening to them received great publicity in the newspapers.
Appeals were frequently made for help in the hospitals in Egypt, to which Australian casualties were evacuated. Sidonia and the two girls decided to volunteer for service there and were accepted ? Sidonia as a Red Cross Worker and the girls as VADs. They were posted to the No. 2 A.G.H.
(Australian General Hospital) where Sidonia worked in the sewing room while the girls worked in the wards, taking temperatures, doing dressings etc. At the same time they enjoyed themselves helping to entertain the troops, going to functions, dancing at the Officers' Club and whatever else was on.
Early in 1916, at the time of the evacuation of Gallipoli, the wards were practically cleared in anticipation of heavy casualties. As it happened, there were only five and there were great celebrations by the troops in Cairo. The girls were invited to go to the famous Shepherd's Hotel. Only officers were allowed to go there and the place was crowded. The men from Gallipoli had not seen white women for a long time and of course Olive and Dot received a great deal of attention and had a wonderful night.
The troops were then moved to France and the girls wanted to go to England to carry on the work they were doing. Sidonia decided to return to Australia, but allowed the girls to go to England. Some of the English women in Egypt were critical of her for permitting the girls to go to England on their own, contrary to social expectations at that time. She angrily replied that she had brought them up and trusted them. Dot met her future husband, Chip Burrows, an English Army Officer (a solicitor in civil life) and saw him whenever he returned to England on leave. They became engaged with the idea of marrying at the end of the war.
Towards the end of 1916, Sidonia decided to return to England. On the voyage, she became seriously ill and, despite the fact that white women were not allowed to land at Port Said, she and another woman were off?loaded and admitted to the American Hospital there. When they were well enough to travel, they were put aboard a second vessel to complete the journey. This ship was torpedoed in the Mediterranean and was quickly abandoned. The passengers took to the lifeboats and, after six or seven hours, were rescued by a Japanese ship carrying wounded from the Middle East to Marseilles, where the passengers disembarked. When they were allocated space in between the bunks bearing the wounded, the man alongside Sidonia died during the night and the following morning a Japanese officer on the ship vacated his cabin, which, to their great relief, was made available to the two women for the remainder of the voyage.
During World War 1, passengers in ships at sea, when not in their cabins, were required to have an overcoat and their money with them at all times, because in the event of the ship being torpedoed, they would not be allowed to return to their cabins. In her luggage, all of which went down with the ship, Sidonia had a valuable family collection of coins and banknotes acquired by her husband, which is doubtless still lying on the floor of the Mediterranean. After landing at Marseilles, the women were put on a train to Lyon, where they bought an English?French dictionary and clothing. They then proceeded to London via Calais and Sidonia was re?united with her daughters, and for some time the three of them lived together in England.
The following year Chip Burrows was badly gassed, evacuated to England and classed unfit for Active Service. Seeing that he would not be returning to the Front, he and Dot decided to get married. Sidonia and Olive continued living in England until after the war ended and in 1919 decided to return to Australia. They arranged to break their journey with a sojourn in Egypt. An English engineer, William Day, was staying at the hotel they selected. They found, to their surprise, that they were friends of Bill's uncle and his family, who lived near them in Randwick. Sidonia's husband, Hugh Mellersh, and Reg Day had been to the same school in Guildford in Surrey, England. Quite apart from the affinity which Bill and Olive felt, the fact that their families were friends would have lead to their ready acceptance of each other. They married in 1919 and in 1981 were still healthy and happy together, looking after themselves in their house in Staines, Middlesex, England.
After Olive married, Sidonia returned to Australia. However, as Hilda was married, Hubert lived in Queensland and Norman was farming, there was no need for her to stay there. She was a widow in her early fifties, enjoyed company, healthy, with a zest for life and an income which enabled her to do the things she wished. She loved travelling and found life in the expatriate country community in Cairo much to her liking and, in between trips to England, where Dot lived, and to Australia, spent most of the next twelve years there. She enjoyed the club life and played golf, something she hadn't done since her husband's death, and also became an above average bridge player. She was a popular person and rejected several offers of marriage during her long widowhood. Perhaps the experience of having five children in quick succession and the responsibility of rearing them on her own, made her value, above all else, the freedom from care she found once her children reached adulthood. In Sydney one suitor made a habit of composing poems about her in Church, admiring her frocks and hats etc. and posted them to her the following day. They caused great merriment in the home where her teenage daughters couldn't imagine anyone being in love with a woman as old as their mother (she was then in her thirties.) Later in Egypt, she became very attached to a younger man, but refused to marry him. He died tragically in a few days from septicaemia, after pricking his finger on a rose.
Sidonia returned to Australia in the 1930's, living first at Lindfield and Killara, before buying a large, beautiful old home set in extensive grounds at Neutral Bay. In recent years it was demolished and replaced by home units. She made her last trip to England in 1939, when 71, but hurried back, saying she couldn't face another war in England. She lived at Neutral Bay until her death, caused by a stroke, on 15 July 1953 at the age of 85.
Hubert, after finishing school and not liking office work, spent some three years or so working on a property near Warwick, Queensland, with people called Allen. He was then allocated a Government Homestead Block of 620 acres at Timber Plains outside Dalby, which he worked successfully as a mixed farm. He later acquired an additional 620 acre block. During World War 2, he sold his farm and bought a newsagency at Redcliff in Brisbane, which he conducted until he retired. He married and had two sons and five daughters.
Norman too found he disliked office work and joined Hubert on his property at Timber Plains for over twelve months. He then spent 1914 doing a course at Hawkesbury Agricultural College, after which he worked on properties on the Northern Rivers of N.S.W. He enlisted in World War 1, but was still training in England when the war ended. He married in 1921, but remained childless. In 1936 he bought a block of land at Caringbah, Sydney and has lived there ever since. In World War 2, he again joined the Army, but remained in Sydney. When the War ended, he was employed in the Public Service where he continued to work until retirement.
Olive and Bill Day had a most interesting life together. Bill went to Cairo in 1911, where he joined the Department of Roads. He returned to England to enlist in the Army early in World War 1 and served in France until the end of the War. Following discharge, he returned to his profession in Cairo, where he married Olive in 1919. He remained in Egypt, eventually becoming Engineer?in?Charge, until 1930, when he went to Athens to work for the Greek Government. The Great Depression struck and, when in 1933 the Government became bankrupt and unable to pay his salary, he returned to England. Some two years later, the Egyptian Government invited him to return to Cairo, which he did and remained there for three years. Thence to Cyprus, to the Department of Public Works, for which he worked until 1941. When World War 2 started, Olive was evacuated to Egypt and later to South Africa. Bill then joined the Shell Company, working as a Resident Engineer, first building roads and later repairing and extending airfields in the Suez Canal area. This job finished with the end of the war, so he joined what was known as "The Hirings" for six months. This was a department of the army, whose function it was to prepare detailed listings of material proposed for auction. On reaching the mandatory retiring age, he left the army and was demobolised in England. Bill returned to the Public Works Department in Cyprus, where he stayed until 1949, when he turned 60 and had to retire. He then bought a small residential hotel at Staines, which he and Olive conducted for nine years, prior to finally retiring to a house in the same suburb. Their marriage was blessed with one daughter, Mary.3

Family with

Hubert Leaf Mellersh b. 1858, d. 26 Feb 1898
Children
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - James Crossley
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Last Edited21 Jan 2001

Citations

  1. [S182] John Burrows, "Mellersh Ancestors," e-mail to Robert Mote, 17 September 2000.
  2. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Yass; Year of Registration: 1889; Registration Number: 7364.
  3. [S47] Ronald Henry Alt, Christoph Alt, Page: 64.
  4. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Yass; Year: 1888; Number: 37986.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

John Alt

M, #43, b. 13 March 1867, d. 23 December 1935
John Alt
FatherChristopher Alt b. 20 May 1828, d. 15 Jul 1873
MotherMartha Crossley b. 15 Oct 1842, d. 14 Aug 1937
RelationshipsGranduncle of Robert Mote
2nd great-grandson of James Thomas John Bean
Great-grandson of James Crossley

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth13 March 1867John Alt was born on Wednesday, 13 March 1867 at Fairy Hole Inn, near Yass, NSW, AustraliaG.1
He was the son of Christopher Alt and Martha Crossley.
Marriage22 April 1891John Alt was married to Mary Ann Crawford Smith, daughter of Thomas Maxwell Smith and Ann Murray, on Wednesday, 22 April 1891 at St Silas' Church, Breadalbane, NSW, AustraliaG.2,3
Death23 December 1935John Alt died on Monday, 23 December 1935 at Gordon, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 68.4

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
the Bowral Free Press, Bowral, NSW, AustraliaG9 October 1897James Alt and John Alt were mentioned in an article in the Bowral Free Press, Bowral, NSW, AustraliaG, on Saturday, 9 October 1897 as follows:

MR. JAMES ALT'S CASE
During the week we received the following letter from Mr. John Alt, Station Master at Gordon, near Sydney.

Dear Sir,

Will you kindly hand over the enclosed cheque for five pounds to the Treasurer of the Berrima District Cottage Hospital as a donation towards the fund of same and subscribed by the mother, three sisters and brother of Mr. James Alt, who was an inmate of the hospital for some time where he had both legs amputated. We were so pleased and satisfied with the careful and kind treatment my brother received in the institution that we could not let it pass without making a small donation.

Yours faithfully,
John Alt.5

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
AnecdoteJohn Alt was born at the Fairy Hole Inn on Fairy Hole Creek near Yass on 13 March 1867. He was the fourth son of Christoph Alt and the second of Martha Crossley, Christoph's second wife. He spent his childhood days at the Yass Hotel, where his father had become the licensee and was educated at Yass. When he was twelve years of age, he was listed in the Yass Courier as being one of the successful students at the first Annual Examinations held by the Yass Public School in December, 1879. The School was opened at the beginning of that year and apparently John was one of the first intake of scholars. Prior to that he attended St. Clement's Church of England School.
     In 1882, at the age of fifteen, he commenced a lifelong career with the New South Wales Railways, which began with his appointment as Junior Porter at Bowning near Yass. Four years later, after promotions to Porter, Shunter and Operator, he was appointed Night Officer at Breadalbane, fifteen miles south of Goulburn. Here he met and married Mary Ann Crawford Smith on 22 April 1891. She was the fifth child of Thomas Maxwell Smith and his wife, Anne Murray, who had married at Goulburn on 20 April 1864. Smith was a British Naval deserter, who jumped ship in the gold rush days of the 1850's and consequently would have been liable to severe punishment if he ever returned to England. He was, nonetheless, a descendant of the Grahams of Tamrawer, Scotland, a noble family, which traces its lineage back to the sixteenth century. Several of its members were created Lords and Knights of the Realm. He settled on a property at Breadalbane and called it "Rosemount" after his wife's birthplace. She was born on 10 January 1843 at Rosemount Farm, Ayrshire, Scotland, the youngest daughter of John and Agnes Murray.
     After appointments at Harden and Goulburn as Night Officer, John became Station Master at Mullion Creek, near Orange in 1892. He was not there for long, being transferred for short periods as Station Master at Cowan and then Bay Road (now Waverton), before being appointed to Gordon where he remained as Station Master until 1902. While at Gordon, the local Non-Official Postmistress (Mrs. Langford) resigned because of insufficient remuneration (£27 per annum). The Post Office was transferred to the Railway Station with John being appointed Postmaster from 2 October 1894, a position he retained until his transfer to Cooma in 1902. He also acted as unofficial agent at Gordon for the newspapers, selling at one penny each. They were sold on the 'honesty' system, whereby people helped themselves and left the money. The fact that it was never short reflects the integrity of the people, estimated at 200, using the Stafion every day.

Following on his transfer, this item appeared in The Pymble News on 4 December 1902:-

Travellers on the Milson's Pt. Line will notice with regret the departure from Gordon of Mr. J. Alt, who was promoted to Cooma, for which place he left last week. Mr. Alt has been on this line for nearly 10 years, of which 9 have been spent at Gordon. During this time he has earned for himself a name which one might feel proud of. Mr. Alt was one of the Churchwardens of St. John's Church of England, Gordon. He was also Honorary Treasurer of the Gordon District Cricket Club and a member of the selection committee.

     He was presented with a liquor stand in appreciation of his services to the Cricket Club.

     Promotion came rapidly after leaving Gordon. He served first at Cooma during the famous 1902 drought, where the only green feed in the State was to be found. Thousands of starving stock arrived by train daily placing the resources available at the Station under great strain. He did a very good job which was recognised by transfers, at short intervals, to larger stations at Blayney and then Cootamundra. The salary he received in each of these positions was:-

1886     Night Officer Breadalbane £120 per annum plus Postal £20 per annum.

1893     O.I.C. Gordon £150 per annum plus free house.

1899     Station Master Cooma £175 per annum plus free house.

1905     Station Master Cootamundra £210 per annum plus free house.

     John was then promoted to Traffic Inspector and spent what was for him probably the most unsatisfactory four years of a very successful career spanning nearly half a century. A Traffic Inspector was the executive officer directly responsible for the efficient operation of a length of the Railway System. The actual length, sometimes hundreds of miles long, depended on the volume of business done. The job imposed tremendous strains on the individual, who was expected to be on the job whenever deemed necessary, irrespective of the hours worked. It was a salaried position and overtime was not paid. After four years in this position, he had a breakdown in health, following on which he returned to the job of Station Master, one at which he obviously excelled.

     Four years to early 1914 were then spent as Station Master at Albury. This was in the days when the N.S.W. and Victorian Railways operated on different gauges and everything, passengers and goods, travelling by rail between the two States, had to be transhipped at Albury from one system to the other. It was a position, constantly beset by problems, calling for dedication, sound judgment and good personal relations with both staff and public. The volume of business at Albury increased dramatically during his time there, resulting in the classification of the Station being upgraded. When this happened, despite John's good work, a more senior man was appointed Station Master and received the higher salary payable on reclassification. John was promoted to the position of Station Master of Bathurst. The local townspeople were most appreciative of what he had accomplished at Albury and several send-offs were organized in his honour. The largest was held on 2 February 1914 on the evening prior to his departure. The Albury Banner and Wodonga Express of the following Friday gave this account of the function.

A POPULAR STATION MASTER - One of the most representative of valedictory gatherings ever held in Albury took place in the Town Hall on Monday night, the object being to pay honour to Mr. John Alt, by inviting him to be the guest of the citizens. Mr. Alt had been stationed in Albury as railway station master for four years, and during that time he carried the respect and esteem of every section of the people, because of his uniform courtesy, efficiency and consideration for the interests of the public in the discharge of the duties of his office. As soon as it became known that Mr. Alt had been promoted to Bathurst, various presentations were arranged by his admirers, but the most important of the series was the large gathering of representative citizens of the town on Monday night. The chair was occupied by the Mayor, Ald. Frere and five other aldermen were present. The toast of Mr. Alt's health was proposed by the Mayor, his remarks being supplemented by Messrs. John Campbell (president of the Albury Chamber of Commerce), Mr. F.J. Belbridge (president of the Albury P. and A. Society and Race Club), Mr. J.D. McDonnell (on behalf of the railway staff), Mr. G.A. Thompson, Mr. P. Bell Munro (manager of the Albury branch of Dalgety and Co.), Ald. Burrows and Mr. H.C. Langley (vice-president of the Cricket Association). The Mayor said he had pleasure in presenting Mr. Alt, on behalf of the citizens, with a handsome and massive tray, bearing the inscription "Presented by the Citizens of Albury to J. Alt, Esq. station master at Albury, on the occasion of his transfer to Bathurst, February 2, 1914."
In responding, Mr. Alt said he regretted very much that the call of duty demanded that he should leave Albury, where he had spent four very pleasant years. Unhappily his duties had until lately been of such a character that he had not been able to participate as he might have desired in the social side of the town's life. In the matter of responsibility, the Albury station ranked next to Sydney and it was his ambition to become stationmaster at the central station. He came to the town on Good Friday, 1910. In 1910 the tickets sold were 38,654 and in 1913 67,532. In 1910 the fares amounted to £33,018 and in 1913 £46,611. During those three years the fares had been reduced. In 1910 the goods tonnage was 73,722 and in 1913 it was 124,583. In 1910 the traffic staff (outside), loco and permanent way men numbered 34. In 1913 it numbered 59 permanent men and between 15 and 20 casuals. In the face of these figures, Albury had been standing back in the regrading. He had nothing to do with that. When the regrading came out, he appealed against it. He had known the new stationmaster, Mr. Irwin, for about fourteen years and he was confident that he would prove himself in every way capable of directing the affairs of the Albury station. The other toasts honoured included that of the incoming stationmaster. Mr. Alt and his family left for Bathurst on Tuesday.


     They were not to remain at Bathurst for very long. Before the end of the year John was appointed Assistant Stationmaster at Central Station in Sydney, the busiest station in the state. For just on sixteen years, the balance of his working life, he was at Central. During World War 1, he controlled all troop trains between there and Liverpool and Menangle, where the big Army camps were located. Keeping the busiest station in N.S.W. operational during the long and bitter Railway Strike in 1917 must have been one of the greatest challenges of his life. Staff who remained on duty were subject to abuse and even assault. When the strike dragged on and the men became embittered and tempers rose, John was taken to and from work each day by car and provided with an escort for protection. It must have been a very difficult period for such a humane man, who always enjoyed good relations with the men under his control.

     During his tour of duty at Central, he was elected, by ballot of all the employees throughout the State, to the position of Employees' Representative on the Railways Appeals Board. The election was held annually and he was returned for several terms. There must have been something of the politician in him, because even when travelling on holidays, he enjoyed alighting at every station to renew acquaintances and make himself known.

     It was part of the duties of the Station Master at Central to be present at the arrival and departure of Royalty, the State Governor or other dignitaries using the official State Train. John collected autographs for his daughter, Marge, included among them those of the Prince of Wales, later Edward the Eighth and the Duke and Duchess of York, later King George VI and Queen Elizabeth. He must have established a good rapport with Sir Walter Davidson, the State Governor, who used the train on numerous occasions. They were both keen cricketers and between them a match was arranged to be played at Sutton Forest, where the Governor's country residence was located. It was to be between the Governor's team and a team from Central Railway Station. The match was a great success and was won by the Railway team captained by John. Sir Walter Davidson later had the ball used that day mounted on an inscribed silver stand and presented it to John as a memento of a very happy occasion.

     When the time came for him to retire on 28 October 1930, he was well known, liked and respected in both the city and country. His services were recognized by the King granting him an award rarely given to railwaymen. It was the Imperial Service Medal, awarded for 'meritorious services rendered'.

     When John's father died in 1873, he left a farm of sixty-nine acres at Fairy Hole Creek, Yass. John's mother kept it as an investment for over twenty years. However, following on the 1892 depression and several unprofitable years, she decided to sell it. Doubtless due to the stringent financial conditions, she was unable, over a period of nearly a year, to find a suitable buyer. There are indications that she was under some financial pressure. Perhaps she had borrowed money on it and was being requested to repay the loan. There was doubtless great discussion about it within the family and she reached the stage of saying that she would be happy to get even two hundred pounds for it. Believing it was a very good buy at that price, John agreed to buy it to help his mother out of her difficulty. Ten years later, when the price of land had improved, he sold it for four hundred pounds to Arthur Bryant of Yass.

     John lost his wife, as a result of an infection following an operation for a stomach ulcer, not quite eleven months prior to his retirement. It was a grievous loss. She had always loyally supported him and took pride in making sure that his uniforms were immaculate, which involved a lot of work for her in the days before dry cleaning establishments. Her efforts were justified, because he was a big man and looked very impressive as he moved around Central Station in the uniform with special cap and knee length coat worn only by the premier station masters in the State. They had six children - three boys and three girls - unfortunately losing the youngest son, Cohn, at the age of four. They had every reason to be proud of their children, whose lives reflected the good home training they had received when growing up. Lindsay, the eldest, completed his career with the Commercial Banking Company of Sydney as Manager for many years at Gunnedah. The esteem in which he was held there was demonstrated by the local paper devoting the whole of the front page, of the issue following his death, to the story of his life and recording his activities as a leading citizen of the town. Jack spent his working life at Dalgety & Co., becoming in time one of their senior executives. Marge (Margaret), who never married, had a successful career nursing at Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, in due course becoming deputy Matron in charge of the Nursing Staff. Joyce joined the Commercial Banking Co. of Sydney and, after a career there of some twenty years, married a fellow employee, Bruce Malcolm. Enid took up nursing and at the age of twenty-four married Dr. Stanley George Bradfield, second youngest son of the designer of the Sydney Harbour Bridge. Enid was widowed as a result of an accident and left with four young children. She remained a widow and reared the children, who are a great credit to her.

     John and his family had a long association with St. John's Church of England, Gordon, where they lived for many years. The children endowed a pew in the Church in memory of their mother and also installed a stained glass window in memory of their father after his death on 23 December
1935.

     John was well known in the Masonic Lodge and at the time of his death had been a member of the Killara Bowling Club for many years. His contemporaries' opinion of him as a man can probably best be gauged by the numerous gifts of appreciation and esteem presented to him by organizations and groups of citizens in the towns where he was stationed. His fellow workers voiced their opinion in the inscription of the wireless set they presented to him on his retirement. It read "A good boss and a White Man", probably the highest compliment they could pay, reflecting their opinion of him in his official capacity and as an individual.


N.B. 'A White Man' was a term used in those days by Australian men to describe another man whom they liked and respected, embodying those characteristics they admired and who could be relied on never to do another a bad turn.1
Occupation1894John Alt was both the Station-Master and Postmaster in 1894 at Gordon, NSW, AustraliaG.

Family with

Mary Ann Crawford Smith b. 15 Jul 1872, d. 18 Dec 1929
Children
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - James Crossley
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Last Edited7 Dec 2004

Citations

  1. [S47] Ronald Henry Alt, Christoph Alt, Page: 58.
  2. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Argyle at Goulburn; Year of Registration: 1891; Registration Number: 2071.
  3. [S235] Birth Certificate, for daughter Enid Agnes Graham Alt shows her parents married at Breadalbane.
  4. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Ashfield; Year: 1935; Number: 20136.
  5. [S47] Ronald Henry Alt, Christoph Alt, Page: 53.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Mary Ann Crawford Smith

F, #44, b. 15 July 1872, d. 18 December 1929
FatherThomas Maxwell Smith b. 21 May 1829, d. 29 Jul 1916
MotherAnn Murray b. 10 Jan 1843, d. 19 Jan 1924

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth15 July 1872Mary Ann Crawford Smith was born on Monday, 15 July 1872 at Breadalbane, NSW, AustraliaG.
She was the daughter of Thomas Maxwell Smith and Ann Murray.
Marriage22 April 1891Mary Ann Crawford Smith was married to John Alt, son of Christopher Alt and Martha Crossley, on Wednesday, 22 April 1891 at St Silas' Church, Breadalbane, NSW, AustraliaG.1,2
Death18 December 1929Mary Ann Crawford Smith died on Wednesday, 18 December 1929 at Gordon, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 57.3

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1891As of 22 April 1891, her married name was Alt.

Family with

John Alt b. 13 Mar 1867, d. 23 Dec 1935
Children
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - James Crossley
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Last Edited7 Dec 2004

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Argyle at Goulburn; Year of Registration: 1891; Registration Number: 2071.
  2. [S235] Birth Certificate, for daughter Enid Agnes Graham Alt shows her parents married at Breadalbane.
  3. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Chatswood; Year: 1929; Number: 21231.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Sedonia Alt

F, #45, b. 31 January 1866, d. 16 February 1866
FatherChristopher Alt b. 20 May 1828, d. 15 Jul 1873
MotherMartha Crossley b. 15 Oct 1842, d. 14 Aug 1937
RelationshipsGrandaunt of Robert Mote
2nd great-granddaughter of James Thomas John Bean
Great-granddaughter of James Crossley

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth31 January 1866Sedonia Alt was born on Wednesday, 31 January 1866 at Yass, NSW, AustraliaG.
She was the daughter of Christopher Alt and Martha Crossley.
Death16 February 1866Sedonia Alt died on Friday, 16 February 1866 at Yass, NSWG.

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
End-LineSedonia Alt has no known descendants.
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - James Crossley
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Last Edited18 Dec 1999

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

James Alt

M, #46, b. 12 August 1864, d. 29 August 1938
James Alt
FatherChristopher Alt b. 20 May 1828, d. 15 Jul 1873
MotherMartha Crossley b. 15 Oct 1842, d. 14 Aug 1937
RelationshipsGranduncle of Robert Mote
2nd great-grandson of James Thomas John Bean
Great-grandson of James Crossley

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth12 August 1864James Alt was born on Friday, 12 August 1864 at Fairy Hole Creek Inn, near Yass, NSW, AustraliaG.1
He was the son of Christopher Alt and Martha Crossley.
Marriage14 April 1884James was married to Hannah Maria Chalker on Monday, 14 April 1884 at Bargo, NSW, AustraliaG.
Marriage1923James was married to Marion E Faque in 1923 at Yass, NSW, AustraliaG.2
Death29 August 1938James Alt died on Monday, 29 August 1938 at St Vincents Hospital, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 74.3
Burial30 August 1938He was buried on 30 August 1938 at Bowning, NSW, AustraliaG.

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
the Yass Courier, Yass, NSW, AustraliaG15 June 1897James Alt also had his accident reported in the Yass Courier, Yass, NSW, AustraliaG, on Tuesday, 15 June 1897 as follows:

Sad Accident
     The sad news reached Yass during Sunday night that Mr. James Alt, stationmaster at Hill Top had been run over by a train and had both his legs cut off. From the news to hand, it is surmised that, as he is subject to fits, he must have taken one and fallen on the line on his way home from Mittagong and while on the line a
train came along and, passing over him, cut off both legs. Immediately the news reached Yass, his mother, Mrs. G. Weatherby and his sister, Mrs. J. J. Sheekey, started for Hill Top, but did not expect to see the unfortunate man alive, as they were informed that he was sinking fast. Alt has a wife and three children and was a very kind and obliging officer. It is only about three weeks since his elder brother, Mr. Henry Alt, died and left a wife and several children.
     As we went to press, the unfortunate man was still alive and both legs had been amputated below the knee in the Bowral hospital.4

the Bowral Free Press, Bowral, NSW, AustraliaG16 June 1897He had an article about him in the Bowral Free Press, Bowral, NSW, AustraliaG, on Wednesday, 16 June 1897 as follows:


Railway Accident at Mittagong
Mr. James Alt

     About 11 o'clock on Saturday night last, Mr. James Alt, Station Master of Hilltop for the past ten years, was found on the railway line near Mittagong platform, with both legs injured, apparently from being run over by a train. Mr. Alt had spent the evening in Mittagong and was intending to return to Hilltop by the goods train that leaves Mittagong about 10.30 pm. It is supposed that he caught hold of the rope attached to the brake-van while the train was in motion, but that his foot slipped off the step and, after holding on for about sixteen yards, let go his hold, falling under the wheel which passed over both legs. Of course that is a good deal conjecture as no one witnessed the sad affair. It is not known how long Mr. Alt lay there, but his groans attracted the attention of a guard who was sleeping in a brake-van on the line alongside and who lost no time in communicating with the doctor and police. He was at once conveyed by a special train to Bowral, accompanied by Dr. Middleton and carried on an ambulance stretcher to the Cottage Hospital where it was found that injuries were so extensive as to necessitate the amputation of both legs, one above and the other below the knee. Dr. Fisher applied the anaesthetic, while Drs. Armstrong and Middleton performed the operation without any delay. The patient passed a bad night from sheer exhaustion through loss of blood and shock and only a strong constitution could have survived it all.
     On Sunday his condition seemed more hopeful, but during that night unfavourable symptoms set in again. On Monday he was in a critical condition and during that night showed unfavourable symptoms. On enquiry at the hospital yesterday afternoon, we learnt that he was in an extremely serious state, at the same time he is not any worse than he was early in the morning. Mr. Alt's recovery is doubtful. We believe an official inquiry into the occurrence is to be made. Mr. Alt is thirty-two years of age and has a wife and three young children. His brother, Mr. Alt, Station Master at Gordon, visited him at the hospital, also his mother, sister and a very large number of friends.4

the Daily Telegraph, NSW, AustraliaHe was mentioned in an article in the Daily Telegraph, NSW, Australia, as follows:

Mittagong, Sunday. A serious accident happened at Mittagong last evening about 11 o'clock to Mr. J. Alt, Stationmaster at Colovale. Mr. Alt was boarding a goods train to go to Colovale and it is supposed that he slipped and fell on the rails. The trucks passed over his legs. The injured man was at once conveyed to the Berrima District Hospital, where the amputation of both legs was deemed necessary. Doubts are entertained of his recovery.5
the Bowral Free Press, Bowral, NSW, AustraliaG7 July 1897He was mentioned in an article in the Bowral Free Press, Bowral, NSW, AustraliaG, on Wednesday, 7 July 1897 as follows:

COTTAGE HOSPITAL, BOWRAL.
WEDNESDAY 7th JULY 1897

     Mr. Alt, the stationmaster at Hilltop who met with an accident, causing both legs to be amputated at the hospital, is progressing favourably and hopes of his recovery are entertained.5

the Yass Courier, Yass, NSW, AustraliaG17 September 1897He was mentioned in an article in the Yass Courier, Yass, NSW, AustraliaG, on Friday, 17 September 1897 as follows:

ACCIDENT TO JAMES ALT
     Mr. Alt, Station master at Cob Vale, who was so injured at Mittagong on 12th June by being run over by a train as to necessitate the amputation of both legs, has recently been discharged from the Cottage Hospital, Bowral, as cured. Very few cases are recorded of recovery after such injuries, and Mr. Alt's bears testimony to the excellence of the medical and nursing treatment he received. It is stated that the Railway Commissioners propose finding Mr. Alt some suitable employment at Goulburn Station.5

the Bowral Free Press, Bowral, NSW, AustraliaG9 October 1897James Alt and John Alt were mentioned in an article in the Bowral Free Press, Bowral, NSW, AustraliaG, on Saturday, 9 October 1897 as follows:

MR. JAMES ALT'S CASE
During the week we received the following letter from Mr. John Alt, Station Master at Gordon, near Sydney.

Dear Sir,

Will you kindly hand over the enclosed cheque for five pounds to the Treasurer of the Berrima District Cottage Hospital as a donation towards the fund of same and subscribed by the mother, three sisters and brother of Mr. James Alt, who was an inmate of the hospital for some time where he had both legs amputated. We were so pleased and satisfied with the careful and kind treatment my brother received in the institution that we could not let it pass without making a small donation.

Yours faithfully,
John Alt.6
the Post Office Journal, 'Postal Notes'1934James Alt was mentioned in an article in the Post Office Journal, 'Postal Notes', in 1934 as follows:

Mr. JAMES ALT

     There is no more interesting personality in the Postal Service than Mr. James Alt, Semi-Official P.M. at Bowning, who celebrated his 70th birthday on the 12th of last month. He joined the railway service in 1879 at Yass Junction, and the following year was promoted to the position of night officer, in which capacity he relieved at Picton, Mittagong, Balmoral, Wingello and Store Creek.
     In 1885 Mr. Alt became officer-in-charge at Hilltop, near Mittagong, and a year later, whilst occupying this position, he fell from a moving train, the injuries sustained resulting in the loss of both legs and his retirement from the railway service.
     In 1907 Mr. Alt accepted appointment as P.M. at Bowning, at that time a busy centre, all material for Burrinjuck Dam being unloaded there. The Kangiara mines were also working, so that the local Post Office was taxed to capacity. Later on when the Southern line was being duplicated, the population of the town increased by 500. During all this time Mr. Alt was giving great service to the public, but probably his finest effort was on the morning of July 11, 1933, when at a point just to the rear of the Post Office, the "down' Albury Mail, conveying about 200 passengers, overturned and was partially wrecked.
     Mr. Alt was called at 4.30 am, and with the assistance of his niece, Miss M. Aylen, set about the task of disposing of telegraph and telephone business, and so they worked, without breakfast, until 1 pm, and even their luncheon period was disturbed in the public interest.
     In spite of his great physical limitations, Mr. Alt always welcomes one with a smile. He is courteous to the public, amongst whom he has many friends. Mr. Alt has never had one day off owing to illness during his term as P.M. at Bowning. He describes his las annual holiday as being "great" and is looking forward earnestly to his next year's leave. It is worth while calling in at Bowning Office any time to see a man who has not let his physical loss interfere with his personality.
     Mr. Alt qualified in telegraphy 55 years ago, so that many H.O. telegraphists who work with Bowning will appreciate that they are working with a man whose experience in the art extends over half a century.7

the Yass Tribune-Courier, Yass, NSW, AustraliaG1 September 1938He had an obituary appear in the Yass Tribune-Courier, Yass, NSW, AustraliaG, on Thursday, 1 September 1938 as follows:

26 YEARS CONTINUOUS DUTY WITHOUT A HOLIDAY
POSTMASTER AT BOWNING FOR 32 YEARS
LATE MR. JAMES ALT

     In the death at St. Vincent's Hospital in Sydney on Monday morning of Mr. James Alt of Bowning, one of the best known personalities in the Postmaster-General's Department has passed
on. Jim Alt was known by everyone in the service. Mr. Alt, who was 74 years of age, was Postmaster at Bowning for 32 years. His record of 26 years continuous duty without a holiday is probably unique.
     A sad but very human incident occurred on Tuesday afternoon. Mr. McCarrigle, of the Yass Post Office Staff, was on duty at Bowning, when the testing operator at the G.P.O. inquired how the old man was. He was not aware that he was being taken to his last resting place that afternoon.
     A native of Yass, Mr. Alt started work at the age of 14 years as a railway porter at Yass Junction. At the age of 32, he lost both legs. He was on duty at Mittagong when he endeavoured to board a train while in motion. He fell and the wheels passed over both his legs. However, he accepted the tragedy philosophically and ten years later took charge of the Bowning Post Office.
     It may not be generally known that there is a big testing station at Bowning, with fifteen trunk morse lines, and Mr. Alt was regarded by the testing officer in the G.P.O. as one of the most reliable testing officers in the south. He was a steady and efficient morse operator and a particularly methodical man.
     When the Albury mail train was derailed just beyond Bowning a few years ago, Mr. Alt rose to the occasion and put up a wonderful performance transmitting and receiving telegrams. He kept the dots and dashes going for hours on end with characteristic efficiency. From the little Bowning Post Office, many anxious moments were relieved f(?r people all over the State who had relatives on the wrecked train.
     But that is only one side of Mr. Alt's long and useful life. As a patriarch of Bowning, he was held in the highest esteem and adrniration.
     The late Mr. Alt is survived by one son, James (Bowning) and one son predeceased him. Two daughters also survive, Mrs Jack O'Brien of Maroubra and Mrs C. Jones of Wau, New Guinea.
     There was a large and representative cortege at the funeral, which took place in Bowning on Tuesday afternoon from the Catholic Church to the local cemetery, where the Rev. Fr. McCusker officiated. The funeral was conducted by Mr W.H. McIntosh.
     Among the wreaths received were the following: Alice and Sam, Clara and Frank, Mr. and Mrs. M.C. Smith and family, Mr. and Mrs. W. Armour, Mr. and Mrs. Loomes and Ric., Anne and Hugh Muir, Zeta and Athol Pearce, Grace and R. Holmes, Miss Wall, Limestone, Mrs. Pearce Senr., and family, Mrs. K. Ryan and family, Mr. and Mrs. Hollis and Mr. and Mrs. Turner, Yass P.O. Staff, Mrs. Morgan and Vera, the Glover family, Mr. and Mrs. Alf. Armour and family, All at Charlesville, Mr. and Mrs. Alchin and family, Mrs. 0. Hilly and family, Mrs. Hannford and family, Mrs. and Mr. W. Chown, Mr. and Mrs. Don Meikieham, Neta and Claude Ryan, Molly Crossley and Mr. and Mrs. G. Armour, Major Weir, B. Eglington, Mr. and Mrs. Bill Richards and family.8

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
AnecdoteJames Alt was born on 12 August 1864 on his parents' farm at Fairy Hole Creek, some 3 kms from Yass. When he was 4 years and 8 months old, the family moved into the Yass Hotel at Yass and this is where he grew up. The family attended St. Clement's Church of England regularly and it is probable that he was educated at the private school conducted under the auspices of that Church. Yass lacked a public school at that time and seven private and three denominational schools provided instruction for the children in the area. James' father died a month before his ninth birthday and his mother continued to conduct the hotel. With an hotel to look after and seven children under the age of fifteen to rear, she must have been carrying a very heavy burden. Six months later she married her second husband, James Frederick Mote. The children would then have a stepfather and she would have someone to share her problems. It was almost five years later that James left home and joined the N.S.W. Railways at Yass Junction in April 1879. He was stationed at Bowning in 1882, where he was appointed a Postal Assistant on 5 September 1882. In those days, the Station Master was usually the Postmaster and, if warranted, a member of the Railway Staff could be appointed as an assistant. James was doubtless doing a good job, because his younger brother, John, commenced his railway career at Bowning that same year and they probably lived together.

     James married Hannah Maria Chalker at Bargo on 14 April 1884, four months before his twentieth birthday. She was born at Mittagong about 1862. Hannah was a member of the Roman Catholic Church, but, as was the custom in those days, on marriage joined the church to which her husband belonged. James is shown in Railway Records as being Station Master on day duty at Hilltop, between Picton and Mittagong, on 22 December 1885. He was appointed Postmaster at Hilltop on 16 December 1887 at the age of 23. The Railways Classification of Officers, dated 24.6.1891 shows him as Officer-in-Charge at Hilltop on a salary of £130 per annum plus a Postal Allowance of £11 per annum. He had to pay 1O/- per week rent for the Stationmaster's residence. On 31.12.1896 he is shown as still in the same job on the same salary and postal allowance, but plus a free house. It appears that during the five years the only increase in salary he had received was the equivalent of the 1OA a week which he had previously had to pay as rent for the house.

     On 12th June 1897, at the age of thirty-two, following a mishap when attempting to board a moving train at Mittagong, both his legs were amputated.1
AnecdoteThe accident must have been a calamity for a young man with a wife and three young children to provide for in a time when social services were virtually unknown. His career with the Railways was finished and he was severely handicapped. However, in due course, he went into business at Balmoral, about 10 kms from Hilltop towards Picton. It was from there that he applied for the position of Postmaster at Bowning. When his application was successful, he had to request time to wind up his business affairs at Balmoral before taking up the position. A report on his application stated that he used cork artificial legs and could move around on them with the help of crutches. He is described as a good Morse Operator and capable of performing the duties required of him.
     Prior to James taking over the Post Office, the Postal business of Bowning had been conducted at the Railway Station. Representations of local townspeople were successful in having the Post Office made a separate entity in a more convenient location 270 yards from the Station adjoining the local Police Station. It was what was known as a Semi-Official Post Office and was staffed on a contract basis. Applicants for the position of Postmaster had to submit a tender stating the amount for which they were prepared to supply premises and conduct the Post Office. James submitted a tender to provide premises measuring 12 feet x 12 feet including 6 feet x 6 feet for public space and perform the duties of Postmaster for the sum of £110 per annum. To appreciate the worth of that sum at the time, it was the year that Mr. Justice Higgins of the Commonwealth Arbitration Court ruled that a basic wage of £2:2:0 (£109:4:0 P.A.) was 'fair and reasonable' to satisfy 'the normal needs of the average employee regarded as a human being living in a civilised community' with a family of five. It became the minimum adult wage and
permitted few luxuries. However, for a man so severely handicapped, it provided James with a roof over his head, a secure job and probably most important of all, a feeling of independence and self-respect in a job well within his capabilities. He remained in this position until the time of his death over 31 years later.
     The job of Postmaster was virtually a way of life. The hours were long and there were no paid annual holidays. He had to be on duty between 5.40 am and 6 am to despatch mail and on duty in the office from 8.30 am until 6.15 pm. James sat behind the counter all day and must have got very tired of being confined to those four walls for the greater part of his time. In 1913 a determined but unsuccessful effort was made to obtain a half holiday for him on Wednesday afternoons. Despite support from local inhabitants, the Shire Council refused to endorse the appeal and permission to close the office for the afternoon was not granted. At that time many country towns closed their shops and offices for the weekly half holiday on Wednesday afternoons in lieu of Saturday.
     It would not have been possible for James to have continued as Postmaster without the active support of his family. In due course his wife was appointed a messenger, however she had to resign in late 1933 because of ill-health. A niece, Miss Marion Aylen, D.O.B. 1.1.1915, who had been reared by James and his wife, was appointed to take her place from 12 October 1933. Mrs Eily Margaret Alt, daughter-in-law, was appointed to the position on 11 April 1937 at a salary of £73 p.a.
     Hannah, James' wife, died some five years before him and in due course a Mrs. Fague became his housekeeper. They married and, in accordance with her wishes, he became a member of the Roman Catholic Church, to which she belonged. Unfortunately, the marriage was not a success and it wasn't long before they parted.
     The Bowning Post Office remained in the same premises from 1.3.1907 when James opened the office until 1936, when the Director General of Posts and Telegraphs, during a visit, described them as disgraceful. On 16 September of that year, it was moved to premises nearby, consisting of four rooms plus kitchen, bathroom and laundry.
     After 31 years service as Postmaster at Bowning, James took ill on 24 August 1938 and was admitted to Yass Hospital. His condition became worse and he was taken to St. Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, on 28 August 1938 and passed away the following day, aged 74. The body was taken to Yass and buried in the Catholic Section of the Bowning Cemetery. Despite his handicap, James must have enjoyed good health, because during those 31 years at Bowning, he had only one period of sick leave of fourteen days from 1/8/1935 to 14/8/35.6

Family with

Hannah Maria Chalker b. 1862, d. 1933
Children
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - James Crossley
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Last Edited7 Dec 2004

Citations

  1. [S47] Ronald Henry Alt, Christoph Alt, Page: 50.
  2. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Marriage Registration: Yass, Registration Year: 1923, Registration Number: 3191.
  3. [S47] Ronald Henry Alt, Christoph Alt, Page: 56.
  4. [S47] Ronald Henry Alt, Christoph Alt, Page: 51.
  5. [S47] Ronald Henry Alt, Christoph Alt, Page: 52.
  6. [S47] Ronald Henry Alt, Christoph Alt, Page: 53.
  7. [S47] Ronald Henry Alt, Christoph Alt, Page: 54.
  8. [S47] Ronald Henry Alt, Christoph Alt, Page: 55.
  9. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Birth Registration: Berrima, Registration Year: 1892, Registration Number: 6930.
  10. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Picton; Year of Registration: 1900; Registration Number: 34576.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Martha Maria Alt

F, #47, b. 23 January 1863, d. 13 April 1934
Martha Maria Alt
FatherChristopher Alt b. 20 May 1828, d. 15 Jul 1873
MotherMartha Crossley b. 15 Oct 1842, d. 14 Aug 1937
RelationshipsGrandaunt of Robert Mote
2nd great-granddaughter of James Thomas John Bean
Great-granddaughter of James Crossley

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth23 January 1863Martha Maria Alt was born on Friday, 23 January 1863 at Fairy Hole Creek, NSW, AustraliaG.
She was the daughter of Christopher Alt and Martha Crossley.
Marriage3 May 1880Martha Maria was married to John Sharp on Monday, 3 May 1880 at Yass, NSW, AustraliaG.
Marriage6 July 1892Martha Maria was married to Thomas Fox on Wednesday, 6 July 1892 at Murrumburrah, NSW, AustraliaG.1
Death13 April 1934Martha Maria Alt died on Friday, 13 April 1934 at Randwick, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 71.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1880As of 3 May 1880, her married name was Sharp.
Married Name1892As of 6 July 1892, her married name was Fox.

Family with 1

John Sharp b. 23 May 1855, d. 26 Nov 1889
Children

Family with 2

Thomas Fox b. 1857, d. 6 Mar 1941
Children
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - James Crossley
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Last Edited21 Jan 2001

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Murrumburrah; Year: 1892; Number: 5212.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Annie Alt

F, #48, b. 25 September 1862

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
DeathAnnie Alt died at AustraliaG.
Birth25 September 1862She was born on Thursday, 25 September 1862 at Yass, NSW, AustraliaG.
Last Edited12 Sep 1999

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Henry Alt

M, #49, b. 16 August 1860, d. 8 May 1897
Henry Alt
FatherChristopher Alt b. 20 May 1828, d. 15 Jul 1873
MotherElizabeth Jeffrey b. 1829, d. 28 Feb 1861
Step-motherMartha Crossley b. 15 Oct 1842, d. 14 Aug 1937

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth16 August 1860Henry Alt was born on Thursday, 16 August 1860 at Yass, NSW, AustraliaG.
He was the son of Christopher Alt and Elizabeth Jeffrey.
Marriage21 June 1887Henry was married to Sarah Alice Lett on Tuesday, 21 June 1887 at Sydney, NSW, AustraliaG.1
Death8 May 1897Henry Alt died on Saturday, 8 May 1897 at Woodstock, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 36.

Family with

Sarah Alice Lett b. 26 Feb 1865, d. 28 Sep 1932
Children
Last Edited26 Jul 2000

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Sydney; Year of Registration: 1887; Registration Number: 899.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Christopher Alt

M, #50, b. 16 October 1858, d. 24 December 1942
Christopher Alt and his extended Family
Back Row: Eric, Clifford, Christopher and William
Front Row: Teresa (Cliff's wife), Stephen, John and Johanna
FatherChristopher Alt b. 20 May 1828, d. 15 Jul 1873
MotherElizabeth Jeffrey b. 1829, d. 28 Feb 1861
Step-motherMartha Crossley b. 15 Oct 1842, d. 14 Aug 1937

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth16 October 1858Christopher Alt was born on Saturday, 16 October 1858 at his parents home in Rossi Street, Yass, NSW, AustraliaG.1
He was the son of Christopher Alt and Elizabeth Jeffrey.
Baptism7 November 1858Christopher Alt was baptized on Sunday, 7 November 1858 at St Clement's Church of England, Yass, NSW, AustraliaG.2
Marriage3 September 1884Christopher was married to Johanna Gillen, daughter of Robert Gillan and Mary Ann Clifford, on Wednesday, 3 September 1884 at Cooma, NSW, AustraliaG.3
Death24 December 1942Christopher Alt died on Thursday, 24 December 1942 at Cooma, NSWG, at age 84.

Family with

Johanna Gillen b. 2 May 1863, d. 23 Apr 1945
Children
Last Edited21 Jan 2001

Citations

  1. [S47] Ronald Henry Alt, Christoph Alt, Pages 27.
  2. [S47] Ronald Henry Alt, Christoph Alt, Page: 27.
  3. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Cooma
    Registration Year: 1884
    Registration Number: 5770.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Christopher Alt

M, #51, b. 20 May 1828, d. 15 July 1873
Christoph Alt
FatherChristoph Alt b. 5 Jan 1783, d. 24 Oct 1844
MotherAnna Margareta Ruhl

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth20 May 1828Christopher Alt was born on Tuesday, 20 May 1828 at Bannerod, Hessen Darmstadt, GermanyG.1
He was the son of Christoph Alt and Anna Margareta Ruhl.
Marriage21 January 1857Christopher was married to Elizabeth Jeffrey, daughter of John Jeffery and Ellen Thompson, on Wednesday, 21 January 1857 at St Clements Church, Yass, NSW, AustraliaG.2
Marriage1 January 1862Christopher was married to Martha Crossley, daughter of Jeremiah Crossley and Sarah James, on Wednesday, 1 January 1862 at Yass, NSWG.3
Marriage21 March 1870Christopher Alt witnessed the marriage of John Schneider and Sidona Kleinschmidt on 21 March 1870 at Yass, NSWG.4
Death15 July 1873Christopher Alt died on Tuesday, 15 July 1873 at Yass, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 45.1
Burial16 July 1873He was buried on 16 July 1873 at the Church of England section of the cemetery, Yass, NSW, AustraliaG.5
Probate7 August 1873Christopher died intestate and Letters of Administration were granted to his widow, Martha, on 7 August 1873, a month after he died. The value of the estate was sworn at three hundred pounds.6

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Name Variation1828As of 20 May 1828, Christopher Alt was also known as Christoph.1
Name Variation1853As of 1853, Christopher Alt was also known as John C and on the road as a carrier he was called "Johnie the German."7

Description

DateDescription
26 July 1848In 26 July 1848 Christopher Alt was described as Born: 1828; Height: 6ft. 5in. (may not be the same as English measurements); Hair: Blond (in German can also mean light brown); Brow: Flat; Eyes: Brown; Eyebrows: Blond; Nose: (word illegible); Mouth: Regular; Beard: None; Chin: Notched; Face: Round; Facial Colour: Fresh (ruddy?); Distinguishing Marks: None.8

Voyages

DateDetails
1852Christopher Alt was a passenger aboard The Ship Reiherstieg which sailed from Hamburg, GermanyG, in 1852 and arrived in Sydney, NSW, Australia on 5 August 1852.

Military Service

EventDateDetails
Milit-Beg10 April 1849Christopher Alt was conscripted on 10 April 1849 in GermanyG into the Hessen Archducal Third Infantry Regiment.
Milit-Medl29 August 1849He was, on 29 August 1849 at CarlsRuhe, GermanyG, awarded a commemorative medal by the Archduchy of Baden. The award certificate translated from German read as follows:
Be it known by these present that it pleased HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS THE ARCHDUKE (of Baden) on this day, the 29th August, 1849 to create and establish a Commemorative Medal in grateful recognition of services rendered him by the allied troops brought into the Archduchy for the purpose of suppressing the late Rebellion and as a lasting memorial of the military virtues displayed by those troops and to award the said medal to all those who took part without stain or disgrace in the late campaign against the rebels, wherefore the said Commemorative Medal is hereby given and awarded to: Private Christoph Alt, Hessen III, Infantry Regiment.

In witness whereof the present Award Certificate is hereby made and issued.9

Milit-Medl16 March 1850He was, on 16 March 1850 at Darmstadt, GermanyG, awarded The Field Service Medal by the Grand Duchy of Hesse. The translation of the German Certificate reads as follows:
Private Christoph Alt of Bannerod in the Administrative District of Alsfeld, at present serving in the Archducal 3rd Infantry Regiment, is hereby awarded the Field Service Medal, as created and established on the 14th June, 1840 for services in time of war. In witness whereof the present attestation is herby made and issued to the said Private Alt.10
Milit-End29 February 1852He was discharged as a Private on 29 February 1852 in GermanyG. His Certificate of Discharge read as follows (as translated from the German):
Private Christoph Alt of Bannerod in the administrative district of Alsfeld, Having been called to the colours in the second conscription intake of the year 1849 and having served since 16th April, 1849 in the III Infantry Regiment is hereby released and discharged from Military Forces of His Highness and Grand Duke of Hesse, in witness whereof the present Certificate of Discharge has been made and issued. The subject of this certificate may be liable for military service in future as a member of the relevant age classification.11

Newspaper Articles

NewspaperDateContent
The Yass Courier, Yass, NSW, AustraliaG18 July 1873Christopher Alt had an obituary appear in The Yass Courier, Yass, NSW, AustraliaG, on Friday, 18 July 1873 as follows:
DEATH OF A WELL-KNOWN TOWNSMAN
On last Tuesday Mr Christopher Alt died at his residence the Yass Hotel, at the comparatively early age of forty-three and his funeral, which was largely attended by all classes, took place on Wednesday afternoon. Mr Alt was for many years a carrier on the road, and was well-known as "Johnie the German". By industry and thrift, he acquired a snug farm in the neighbourhood of Yass, which he cultivated successfully, and latterly became landlord of the Yass Hotel. Not long after commencing hotelkeeping, he was attacked with illness, from which he suffered until the hour of his death, although medical practitioners both in Yass and Sydney were consulted. He was very generally respected and leaves a wife and seven children behind to mourn the loss of an attentive husband and father.6

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
EducationChristopher Alt was educated at Bannerod, GermanyG, The shipping records show that Christoph could read and write when he emmigrated to Australia.
Occupationfrom August 1848 to April 1849He was a manservant from August 1848 to April 1849 at Lauterbach, GermanyG.12
Occupationfrom 1853 to 1859He was a carrier between Yass and Sydney from 1853 to 1859.13
Naturalization14 February 1861He was naturalized on 14 February 1861 at Yass, NSW, AustraliaG.14
Occupationcirca 1862He was a farmer and inn keeper circa 1862 at Yass, NSWG.

Family with 1

Elizabeth Jeffrey b. 1829, d. 28 Feb 1861
Children

Family with 2

Martha Crossley b. 15 Oct 1842, d. 14 Aug 1937
Children
ChartsIndented Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Box Descendant Chart - Thomas Beane
Descendant Chart - James Crossley
Descendant Chart - Samuel James
Last Edited22 Jan 2017

Citations

  1. [S47] Ronald Henry Alt, Christoph Alt, Appendic C, Family Tree No. 1.
  2. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Marriage Registration: Yass; Registration Year: 1857; Registration Number: 2858.
  3. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Yass
    Registration Year: 1862
    Registration Number: 3290.
  4. [S47] Ronald Henry Alt, Christoph Alt, page 79.
  5. [S47] Ronald Henry Alt, Christoph Alt, Pages 22.
  6. [S47] Ronald Henry Alt, Christoph Alt, Pages 23.
  7. [S47] Ronald Henry Alt, Christoph Alt, Pages 13.
  8. [S47] Ronald Henry Alt, Christoph Alt, Page 5.
  9. [S47] Ronald Henry Alt, Christoph Alt, Page 6.
  10. [S47] Ronald Henry Alt, Christoph Alt, Page 8.
  11. [S47] Ronald Henry Alt, Christoph Alt, Page 9.
  12. [S47] Ronald Henry Alt, Christoph Alt, Page 2.
  13. [S47] Ronald Henry Alt, Christoph Alt, Pages 10-13.
  14. [S47] Ronald Henry Alt, Christoph Alt, Pages 14.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Elizabeth Jeffrey

F, #52, b. 1829, d. 28 February 1861
FatherJohn Jeffery
MotherEllen Thompson1

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth1829Elizabeth Jeffrey was born in 1829 at Roxburghshire, ScotlandG; sometime between 21 January and 28 February.1
She was the daughter of John Jeffery and Ellen Thompson.1
Marriage21 January 1857Elizabeth was married to Christopher Alt, son of Christoph Alt and Anna Margareta Ruhl, on Wednesday, 21 January 1857 at St Clements Church, Yass, NSW, AustraliaG.2
Death28 February 1861Elizabeth Jeffrey died on Thursday, 28 February 1861 at North Yass, NSW, AustraliaG.
BurialShe was buried at the churchyard of St. Clement's Church, Yass, NSW, AustraliaG. The inscription on the headstone read Sacred to the Memory of Elizabeth Jeffrey Beloved Wife of Christopher Alt Native of Roxburghshire Scotland My God Beholds and will not forget The Rod will blossom in glory yet.3

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1857As of 21 January 1857, her married name was Alt.2

Voyages

DateDetails
6 February 1855Elizabeth Jeffrey immigrated on 6 February 1855 to Sydney, NSW, AustraliaG; aboard the sailing ship Nabob, 98 days out from Liverpool, England. In the passenger list she is described as aged 26, in good health, a kitchen or dairy maid, can read and write, religion Church of Scotland and as coming from Kersmains, Roxburghshire, Scotland. Both of her parents were dead.1

Family with

Christopher Alt b. 20 May 1828, d. 15 Jul 1873
Children
Last Edited21 Jan 2001

Citations

  1. [S47] Ronald Henry Alt, Christoph Alt, Pages 24.
  2. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Marriage Registration: Yass; Registration Year: 1857; Registration Number: 2858.
  3. [S47] Ronald Henry Alt, Christoph Alt, Pages 25.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Johanna Gillen

F, #53, b. 2 May 1863, d. 23 April 1945
FatherRobert Gillan
MotherMary Ann Clifford

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth2 May 1863Johanna Gillen was born on Saturday, 2 May 1863 at Cooma, NSW, AustraliaG.1
She was the daughter of Robert Gillan and Mary Ann Clifford.
Marriage3 September 1884Johanna was married to Christopher Alt, son of Christopher Alt and Elizabeth Jeffrey, on Wednesday, 3 September 1884 at Cooma, NSWG.2
Death23 April 1945Johanna Gillen died on Monday, 23 April 1945 at Auburn, NSW, AustraliaG, at age 81.3

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Name Variation1863As of 1863, Johanna Gillen was also known as Gillan As shown in her birth entry in the NSW BDM Index.
Name Variation1884As of 1884, Johanna Gillen was also known as Johanna Gillon As shown in her marriage entry in the NSW BDM Index.
Married Name1884As of 3 September 1884, her married name was Alt.2

Family with

Christopher Alt b. 16 Oct 1858, d. 24 Dec 1942
Children
Last Edited15 Oct 1999

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Cooma
    Registration Year: 1863
    Registration Number: 7077.
  2. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Cooma
    Registration Year: 1884
    Registration Number: 5770.
  3. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Auburn
    Registration Year: 1945
    Registration Number: 7370.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

William Henry Alt

M, #54, b. 15 March 1887, d. 17 August 1964
FatherChristopher Alt b. 16 Oct 1858, d. 24 Dec 1942
MotherJohanna Gillen b. 2 May 1863, d. 23 Apr 1945

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth15 March 1887William Henry Alt was born on Tuesday, 15 March 1887 at Cooma, NSW, AustraliaG.1
He was the son of Christopher Alt and Johanna Gillen.
Marriage17 September 1922William Henry was married to Agartha Mabel Murray on Sunday, 17 September 1922.
Marriage1934William Henry was married to Isabel Annakin, daughter of Joseph Annakin and Ellen Coulson, in 1934 at Marrickville, NSW, AustraliaG.2
Death17 August 1964William Henry Alt died on Monday, 17 August 1964 at AustraliaG at age 77.

Family with

Agartha Mabel Murray b. 1892, d. 26 Nov 1974
Child
Last Edited29 Dec 1999

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Cooma
    Registration Year: 1887
    Registration Number: 27171.
  2. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Registration - Place: Marrickville; Year: 1934; Number: 3252.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Clifford Silas Alt

M, #55, b. 4 November 1889, d. 20 June 1974
FatherChristopher Alt b. 16 Oct 1858, d. 24 Dec 1942
MotherJohanna Gillen b. 2 May 1863, d. 23 Apr 1945

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth4 November 1889Clifford Silas Alt was born on Monday, 4 November 1889 at Gundagai, NSW, AustraliaG.1
He was the son of Christopher Alt and Johanna Gillen.
Marriage23 April 1913Clifford Silas was married to Teresa Margaret Gutterson, daughter of Stephen Gutterson and Theresa Hines, on Wednesday, 23 April 1913 at Bombala, NSW, AustraliaG.2
Marriage22 April 1935Clifford Silas was married to Iris Anna Muriel Kelly on Monday, 22 April 1935 at Cooma, NSW, AustraliaG.3
Death20 June 1974Clifford Silas Alt died on Thursday, 20 June 1974 at AustraliaG at age 84.

Family with

Teresa Margaret Gutterson b. 27 Jul 1886, d. 10 Nov 1933
Children
Last Edited18 Dec 1999

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Gundagai
    Registration Year: 1889
    Registration Number: 21864.
  2. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Bombala; Registration Year: 1913; Registration Number: 6173.
  3. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Cooma; Registration Year: 1935; Registration Number: 6378.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Christopher Eric Alt

M, #56, b. 23 January 1892, d. 26 May 1974
FatherChristopher Alt b. 16 Oct 1858, d. 24 Dec 1942
MotherJohanna Gillen b. 2 May 1863, d. 23 Apr 1945

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
Birth23 January 1892Christopher Eric Alt was born on Saturday, 23 January 1892 at Murrumburrah, NSW, AustraliaG.1
He was the son of Christopher Alt and Johanna Gillen.
Marriage21 June 1930Christopher Eric was married to Evelyn Sheridan on Saturday, 21 June 1930.
Death26 May 1974Christopher Eric Alt died on Sunday, 26 May 1974 at AustraliaG at age 82.
Last Edited12 Sep 1999

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Murrumburrah
    Registration Year: 1892
    Registration Number: 23824.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Stephen Eric Alt

M, #58, b. 21 September 1914
FatherClifford Silas Alt b. 4 Nov 1889, d. 20 Jun 1974
MotherTeresa Margaret Gutterson b. 27 Jul 1886, d. 10 Nov 1933

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
DeathStephen Eric Alt died at AustraliaG.
Birth21 September 1914He was born on Monday, 21 September 1914 at Bombala, NSW, AustraliaG.1
He was the son of Clifford Silas Alt and Teresa Margaret Gutterson.
Last Edited3 Mar 2000

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Bombala
    Registration Year: 1914
    Registration Number: 49637.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Mary Griffin1

F, #59

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
DeathMary Griffin died at AustraliaG.
Marriagebefore 1852Mary was married to William Dixon before 1852.

Also Known As

DescriptionDateName
Married Name1852As of before 1852, her married name was Dixon.

Voyages

DateDetails
28 October 1849Mary Griffin was a passenger aboard The Ship Thomas Arbuthnot which sailed from Plymouth, EnglandG, on Sunday, 28 October 1849 and arrived in Botany Bay, Sydney, NSW on 3 February 1850.

Other Details

LabelDateDetails
Articlebefore 1848Her early life is covered in a book titled "A Decent Set of Girls" (ISBN 0 646 27449 X.)1

Family with

William Dixon
Child
Last Edited3 Oct 2004

Citations

  1. [S403] Marshall Tanner, "Margaret Semple," e-mail to Robert Mote, 30 August 2003.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.

Harriet Wheeler

F, #60, d. 1916

Life Span

EVENTDATEDETAILS
BirthHarriet Wheeler was born.
Marriage1874Harriet was married to Robert Henry Wharfe, son of James Wharfe and Sarah T Thompkins, in 1874 at Mudgee, NSW, AustraliaG.1
Death1916Harriet Wheeler died in 1916 at Parramatta, NSW, AustraliaG.2

Family with

Robert Henry Wharfe b. 8 Aug 1846, d. 1907
Children
Last Edited8 Apr 2001

Citations

  1. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Mudgee; Year: 1874; Number: 3001.
  2. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Parramatta; Year: 1916; Number: 17550.
  3. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Gulgong; Year: 1875; Number: 15046.
  4. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Carcoar; Year: 1877; Number: 9922.
  5. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Parramatta; Year: 1879; Number: 20799.
  6. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Central Cumberland; Year: 1882; Number: 14254.
  7. [S335] Doreen Cracknell, "R H Wharfe's Family," e-mail to Robert Mote, 13 September 2002.
  8. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Central Cumberland; Year: 1886; Number: 18399.
  9. [S2] Index of BDM records, NSW BDM, Place of Registration: Central Cumberland; Year: 1887; Number: 19054.

PLEASE NOTE: While I do my best to validate data included on this web page I offer no guarantee as to its accuracy.